dcsimg

Overview

provided by EOL authors

Living species of the class Reptilia are placed in four orders. The order Testudines includes turtles, the order Squamata includes lizards and snakes, the order Crocodylia contains crocodiles and alligators, and the order Rhynchocephalia contains the lizard-like tuataras.

As opposed to mammals and birds, reptiles have neither fur nor feathers, but scales. Reptiles can not be confused with amphibians because reptiles have dry, water-proof skin and eggs, as well as internal fertilization and more advanced circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and nervous systems.

Reptiles evolved from labyrinthodont amphibians 300 million years ago. The success of this terrestrial vertebrate group is due in large part to the evolution of shelled, large-yolked eggs in which the embryo has an independent water supply. This advance, as well as the development of internal fertilization, enabled reptiles to be the first vertebrates to sever their ties with water. They radiated out across the landscape, diversifying quickly and becoming the dominant life form on the planet during the Mesozoic Era, otherwise known as the age of the reptiles.

Reference

Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Paul D. N. Hebert (Lead Author);Mark McGinley (Topic Editor) "Reptile". In: Encyclopedia of Earth. Eds. Cutler J. Cleveland (Washington, D.C.: Environmental Information Coalition, National Council for Science and the Environment). [First published in the Encyclopedia of Earth October 9, 2008; Last revised Date May 2, 2011; Retrieved September 27, 2012. Encyclopedia of Earth.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Paul D. N. Hebert (Lead Author);Mark McGinley (Topic Editor)
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Reptile

provided by wikipedia EN

Reptiles, as most commonly defined, are the animals in the class Reptilia (/rɛpˈtɪliə/), a paraphyletic grouping comprising all sauropsid amniotes except Aves (birds).[1] Living reptiles comprise turtles, crocodilians, squamates (lizards and snakes) and rhynchocephalians (tuatara). In the traditional Linnaean classification system, birds are considered a separate class to reptiles. However, crocodilians are more closely related to birds than they are to other living reptiles, and so modern cladistic classification systems include birds within Reptilia, redefining the term as a clade. Other cladistic definitions abandon the term reptile altogether in favor of the clade Sauropsida, which refers to all animals more closely related to modern reptiles than to mammals. The study of the traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology.

The earliest known proto-reptiles originated around 312 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, having evolved from advanced reptiliomorph tetrapods which became increasingly adapted to life on dry land. The earliest known eureptile ("true reptile") was Hylonomus, a small and superficially lizard-like animal. Genetic and fossil data argues that the two largest lineages of reptiles, Archosauromorpha (crocodilians, birds and kin) and Lepidosauromorpha (lizards and kin), diverged near the end of the Permian period.[2] In addition to the living reptiles, there are many diverse groups that are now extinct, in some cases due to mass extinction events. In particular, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event wiped out the pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, and all non-avian dinosaurs alongside many species of crocodyliforms, and squamates (e.g., mosasaurs). Modern non-bird reptiles inhabit all the continents except Antarctica.

Reptiles are tetrapod vertebrates, creatures that either have four limbs or, like snakes, are descended from four-limbed ancestors. Unlike amphibians, reptiles do not have an aquatic larval stage. Most reptiles are oviparous, although several species of squamates are viviparous, as were some extinct aquatic clades[3] – the fetus develops within the mother, using a (non-mammalian) placenta rather than contained in an eggshell. As amniotes, reptile eggs are surrounded by membranes for protection and transport, which adapt them to reproduction on dry land. Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals, with some providing initial care for their hatchlings. Extant reptiles range in size from a tiny gecko, Sphaerodactylus ariasae, which can grow up to 17 mm (0.7 in) to the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, which can reach 6 m (19.7 ft) in length and weigh over 1,000 kg (2,200 lb).

Contents

Classification

Research history

 src=
Reptiles, from Nouveau Larousse Illustré, 1897–1904, notice the inclusion of amphibians (below the crocodiles)

In the 13th century the category of reptile was recognized in Europe as consisting of a miscellany of egg-laying creatures, including "snakes, various fantastic monsters, lizards, assorted amphibians, and worms", as recorded by Vincent of Beauvais in his Mirror of Nature.[4] In the 18th century, the reptiles were, from the outset of classification, grouped with the amphibians. Linnaeus, working from species-poor Sweden, where the common adder and grass snake are often found hunting in water, included all reptiles and amphibians in class "III – Amphibia" in his Systema Naturæ.[5] The terms reptile and amphibian were largely interchangeable, reptile (from Latin repere, 'to creep') being preferred by the French.[6] Josephus Nicolaus Laurenti was the first to formally use the term Reptilia for an expanded selection of reptiles and amphibians basically similar to that of Linnaeus.[7] Today, the two groups are still commonly treated under the single heading herpetology.

 src=
"Antediluvian monster", a Mosasaurus discovered in a Maastricht limestone quarry, 1770 (contemporary engraving)

It was not until the beginning of the 19th century that it became clear that reptiles and amphibians are, in fact, quite different animals, and Pierre André Latreille erected the class Batracia (1825) for the latter, dividing the tetrapods into the four familiar classes of reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals.[8] The British anatomist Thomas Henry Huxley made Latreille's definition popular and, together with Richard Owen, expanded Reptilia to include the various fossil "antediluvian monsters", including dinosaurs and the mammal-like (synapsid) Dicynodon he helped describe. This was not the only possible classification scheme: In the Hunterian lectures delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1863, Huxley grouped the vertebrates into mammals, sauroids, and ichthyoids (the latter containing the fishes and amphibians). He subsequently proposed the names of Sauropsida and Ichthyopsida for the latter two groups.[9] In 1866, Haeckel demonstrated that vertebrates could be divided based on their reproductive strategies, and that reptiles, birds, and mammals were united by the amniotic egg.

The terms Sauropsida ('lizard faces') and Theropsida ('beast faces') were used again in 1916 by E.S. Goodrich to distinguish between lizards, birds, and their relatives on the one hand (Sauropsida) and mammals and their extinct relatives (Theropsida) on the other. Goodrich supported this division by the nature of the hearts and blood vessels in each group, and other features, such as the structure of the forebrain. According to Goodrich, both lineages evolved from an earlier stem group, Protosauria ("first lizards") in which he included some animals today considered reptile-like amphibians, as well as early reptiles.[10]

In 1956, D.M.S. Watson observed that the first two groups diverged very early in reptilian history, so he divided Goodrich's Protosauria between them. He also reinterpreted Sauropsida and Theropsida to exclude birds and mammals, respectively. Thus his Sauropsida included Procolophonia, Eosuchia, Millerosauria, Chelonia (turtles), Squamata (lizards and snakes), Rhynchocephalia, Crocodilia, "thecodonts" (paraphyletic basal Archosauria), non-avian dinosaurs, pterosaurs, ichthyosaurs, and sauropterygians.[11]

In the late 19th century, a number of definitions of Reptilia were offered. The traits listed by Lydekker in 1896, for example, include a single occipital condyle, a jaw joint formed by the quadrate and articular bones, and certain characteristics of the vertebrae.[12] The animals singled out by these formulations, the amniotes other than the mammals and the birds, are still those considered reptiles today.[13]

 src=
The first reptiles had an anapsid type of skull roof, as seen in the Permian genus Captorhinus

The synapsid/sauropsid division supplemented another approach, one that split the reptiles into four subclasses based on the number and position of temporal fenestrae, openings in the sides of the skull behind the eyes. This classification was initiated by Henry Fairfield Osborn and elaborated and made popular by Romer's classic Vertebrate Paleontology.[14][15] Those four subclasses were:

 src=
Phylogenetic classifications group the traditional "mammal-like reptiles", like this Varanodon, with other synapsids, not with extant reptiles

The composition of Euryapsida was uncertain. Ichthyosaurs were, at times, considered to have arisen independently of the other euryapsids, and given the older name Parapsida. Parapsida was later discarded as a group for the most part (ichthyosaurs being classified as incertae sedis or with Euryapsida). However, four (or three if Euryapsida is merged into Diapsida) subclasses remained more or less universal for non-specialist work throughout the 20th century. It has largely been abandoned by recent researchers: In particular, the anapsid condition has been found to occur so variably among unrelated groups that it is not now considered a useful distinction.[16]

Phylogenetics and modern definition

By the early 21st century, vertebrate paleontologists were beginning to adopt phylogenetic taxonomy, in which all groups are defined in such a way as to be monophyletic; that is, groups which include all descendants of a particular ancestor. The reptiles as historically defined are paraphyletic, since they exclude both birds and mammals. These respectively evolved from dinosaurs and from early therapsids, which were both traditionally called reptiles.[17] Birds are more closely related to crocodilians than the latter are to the rest of extant reptiles. Colin Tudge wrote:

Mammals are a clade, and therefore the cladists are happy to acknowledge the traditional taxon Mammalia; and birds, too, are a clade, universally ascribed to the formal taxon Aves. Mammalia and Aves are, in fact, subclades within the grand clade of the Amniota. But the traditional class Reptilia is not a clade. It is just a section of the clade Amniota: the section that is left after the Mammalia and Aves have been hived off. It cannot be defined by synapomorphies, as is the proper way. Instead, it is defined by a combination of the features it has and the features it lacks: reptiles are the amniotes that lack fur or feathers. At best, the cladists suggest, we could say that the traditional Reptilia are 'non-avian, non-mammalian amniotes'.[13]

Despite the early proposals for replacing the paraphyletic Reptilia with a monophyletic Sauropsida, which includes birds, that term was never adopted widely or, when it was, was not applied consistently.[18]

 src=
Bearded dragon (pogona) skeleton on display at the Museum of Osteology

When Sauropsida was used, it often had the same content or even the same definition as Reptilia. In 1988, Jacques Gauthier proposed a cladistic definition of Reptilia as a monophyletic node-based crown group containing turtles, lizards and snakes, crocodilians, and birds, their common ancestor and all its descendants. While Gauthier's definition was close to the modern consensus, nonetheless, it became considered inadequate because the actual relationship of turtles to other reptiles was not yet well understood at this time.[18] Major revisions since have included the reassignment of synapsids as non-reptiles, and classification of turtles as diapsids.[18]

A variety of other definitions were proposed by other scientists in the years following Gauthier's paper. The first such new definition, which attempted to adhere to the standards of the PhyloCode, was published by Modesto and Anderson in 2004. Modesto and Anderson reviewed the many previous definitions and proposed a modified definition, which they intended to retain most traditional content of the group while keeping it stable and monophyletic. They defined Reptilia as all amniotes closer to Lacerta agilis and Crocodylus niloticus than to Homo sapiens. This stem-based definition is equivalent to the more common definition of Sauropsida, which Modesto and Anderson synonymized with Reptilia, since the latter is better known and more frequently used. Unlike most previous definitions of Reptilia, however, Modesto and Anderson's definition includes birds,[18] as they are within the clade that includes both lizards and crocodiles.[18]

Taxonomy

General classification of extinct and living reptiles, focusing on major groups.[19][20]

Phylogeny

The cladogram presented here illustrates the "family tree" of reptiles, and follows a simplified version of the relationships found by M.S. Lee, in 2013.[21] All genetic studies have supported the hypothesis that turtles are diapsids; some have placed turtles within Archosauromorpha,[21][22][23][24][25][26] though a few have recovered turtles as Lepidosauromorpha instead.[27] The cladogram below used a combination of genetic (molecular) and fossil (morphological) data to obtain its results.[21]

Amniota

Synapsida (mammals and their extinct relatives) Rattus norvegicus (white background).png

Sauropsida / Reptilia

Millerettidae Milleretta BW flipped.jpg

unnamed

Eunotosaurus

Lanthanosuchidae Lanthanosuchus NT flipped.jpg

Procolophonoidea Sclerosaurus1DB.jpg

   

Pareiasauromorpha Scutosaurus BW flipped.jpg

          Eureptilia

Captorhinidae Labidosaurus flipped.jpg

Romeriida

Paleothyris

Diapsida

Araeoscelidia Spinoaequalis schultzei reconstruction.jpg

Neodiapsida

ClaudiosaurusClaudiosaurus white background.jpg

     

Younginiformes Hovasaurus BW flipped.jpg

Crown Reptilia/ Pan-Lepidosauria/  

Kuehneosauridae Icarosaurus white background.jpg

Lepidosauria

Rhynchocephalia (tuatara and their extinct relatives) Hatteria white background.jpg

   

Squamata (lizards and snakes) British reptiles, amphibians, and fresh-water fishes (1920) (Lacerta agilis).jpg Python natalensis Smith 1840 white background.jpg

    Lepidosauromorpha Archelosauria/ Pan-Archosauria

Choristodera Hyphalosaurus mmartyniuk wiki.png

Archosauromorpha s. s.

Prolacertiformes Prolacerta broomi.jpg

       

TrilophosaurusTrilophosaurus buettneri (flipped).jpg

   

Rhynchosauria Hyperodapedon BW2 white background.jpg

     

Archosauriformes (crocodiles, birds, dinosaurs and extinct relatives) Deinosuchus riograndensis.png Meyers grosses Konversations-Lexikon - ein Nachschlagewerk des allgemeinen Wissens (1908) (Antwerpener Breiftaube).jpg

        Pan-Testudines/  

Eosauropterygia Dolichorhynchops BW flipped.jpg

     

Placodontia Psephoderma BW flipped.jpg

     

Sinosaurosphargis

     

Odontochelys

Testudinata

Proganochelys

   

Testudines (turtles) Erpétologie générale, ou, Histoire naturelle complète des reptiles (Centrochelys sulcata).jpg

          Pantestudines Archosauromorpha s. l. Sauria           (total group)  

The position of turtles

The placement of turtles has historically been highly variable. Classically, turtles were considered to be related to the primitive anapsid reptiles.[28] Molecular work has usually placed turtles within the diapsids. As of 2013, three turtle genomes have been sequenced.[29] The results place turtles as a sister clade to the archosaurs, the group that includes crocodiles, dinosaurs, and birds.[30] However, in their comparative analysis of the timing of organogenesis, Werneburg and Sánchez-Villagra (2009) found support for the hypothesis that turtles belong to a separate clade within Sauropsida, outside the saurian clade altogether.[31]

Evolutionary history

Origin of the reptiles

 src=
An early reptile Hylonomus
 src=
Mesozoic scene showing typical reptilian megafauna: dinosaurs including Europasaurus holgeri, iguanodonts, and Archaeopteryx lithographica perched on the foreground tree stump

The origin of the reptiles lies about 310–320 million years ago, in the steaming swamps of the late Carboniferous period, when the first reptiles evolved from advanced reptiliomorphs.[32]

The oldest known animal that may have been an amniote is Casineria (though it may have been a temnospondyl).[33][34][35] A series of footprints from the fossil strata of Nova Scotia dated to 315 Ma show typical reptilian toes and imprints of scales.[36] These tracks are attributed to Hylonomus, the oldest unquestionable reptile known.[37] It was a small, lizard-like animal, about 20 to 30 centimetres (7.9 to 11.8 in) long, with numerous sharp teeth indicating an insectivorous diet.[38] Other examples include Westlothiana (for the moment considered a reptiliomorph rather than a true amniote)[39] and Paleothyris, both of similar build and presumably similar habit.

However, microsaurs have been at times considered true reptiles, so an earlier origin is possible.[40]

Rise of the reptiles

The earliest amniotes, including stem-reptiles (those amniotes closer to modern reptiles than to mammals), were largely overshadowed by larger stem-tetrapods, such as Cochleosaurus, and remained a small, inconspicuous part of the fauna until the Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse.[41] This sudden collapse affected several large groups. Primitive tetrapods were particularly devastated, while stem-reptiles fared better, being ecologically adapted to the drier conditions that followed. Primitive tetrapods, like modern amphibians, need to return to water to lay eggs; in contrast, amniotes, like modern reptiles – whose eggs possess a shell that allows them to be laid on land – were better adapted to the new conditions. Amniotes acquired new niches at a faster rate than before the collapse and at a much faster rate than primitive tetrapods. They acquired new feeding strategies including herbivory and carnivory, previously only having been insectivores and piscivores.[41] From this point forward, reptiles dominated communities and had a greater diversity than primitive tetrapods, setting the stage for the Mesozoic (known as the Age of Reptiles).[42] One of the best known early stem-reptiles is Mesosaurus, a genus from the Early Permian that had returned to water, feeding on fish.

A 2021 examination of reptile diversity in the Carboniferous and Permian suggests a much higher degree of diversity than previously thought, comparable or even exceeding that of synapsids. Thus, the "First Age of Reptiles" was proposed.[40]

Anapsids, synapsids, diapsids, and sauropsids

 src=
A = Anapsid,
B = Synapsid,
C = Diapsid

It was traditionally assumed that the first reptiles retained an anapsid skull inherited from their ancestors.[43] This type of skull has a skull roof with only holes for the nostrils, eyes and a pineal eye.[28] The discoveries of synapsid-like openings (see below) in the skull roof of the skulls of several members of Parareptilia (the clade containing most of the amniotes traditionally referred to as "anapsids"), including lanthanosuchoids, millerettids, bolosaurids, some nycteroleterids, some procolophonoids and at least some mesosaurs[44][45][46] made it more ambiguous and it's currently uncertain whether the ancestral amniote had an anapsid-like or synapsid-like skull.[46] These animals are traditionally referred to as "anapsids", and form a paraphyletic basic stock from which other groups evolved.[18] Very shortly after the first amniotes appeared, a lineage called Synapsida split off; this group was characterized by a temporal opening in the skull behind each eye to give room for the jaw muscle to move. These are the "mammal-like amniotes", or stem-mammals, that later gave rise to the true mammals.[47] Soon after, another group evolved a similar trait, this time with a double opening behind each eye, earning them the name Diapsida ("two arches").[43] The function of the holes in these groups was to lighten the skull and give room for the jaw muscles to move, allowing for a more powerful bite.[28]

Turtles have been traditionally believed to be surviving parareptiles, on the basis of their anapsid skull structure, which was assumed to be primitive trait.[48] The rationale for this classification has been disputed, with some arguing that turtles are diapsids that evolved anapsid skulls in order to improve their armor.[32] Later morphological phylogenetic studies with this in mind placed turtles firmly within Diapsida.[49] All molecular studies have strongly upheld the placement of turtles within diapsids, most commonly as a sister group to extant archosaurs.[23][24][25][26]

Permian reptiles

With the close of the Carboniferous, the amniotes became the dominant tetrapod fauna. While primitive, terrestrial reptiliomorphs still existed, the synapsid amniotes evolved the first truly terrestrial megafauna (giant animals) in the form of pelycosaurs, such as Edaphosaurus and the carnivorous Dimetrodon. In the mid-Permian period, the climate became drier, resulting in a change of fauna: The pelycosaurs were replaced by the therapsids.[50]

The parareptiles, whose massive skull roofs had no postorbital holes, continued and flourished throughout the Permian. The pareiasaurian parareptiles reached giant proportions in the late Permian, eventually disappearing at the close of the period (the turtles being possible survivors).[50]

Early in the period, the modern reptiles, or crown-group reptiles, evolved and split into two main lineages: the Archosauromorpha (forebears of turtles, crocodiles, and dinosaurs) and the Lepidosauromorpha (predecessors of modern lizards and tuataras). Both groups remained lizard-like and relatively small and inconspicuous during the Permian.

Mesozoic reptiles

The close of the Permian saw the greatest mass extinction known (see the Permian–Triassic extinction event), an event prolonged by the combination of two or more distinct extinction pulses.[51] Most of the earlier parareptile and synapsid megafauna disappeared, being replaced by the true reptiles, particularly archosauromorphs. These were characterized by elongated hind legs and an erect pose, the early forms looking somewhat like long-legged crocodiles. The archosaurs became the dominant group during the Triassic period, though it took 30 million years before their diversity was as great as the animals that lived in the Permian.[51] Archosaurs developed into the well-known dinosaurs and pterosaurs, as well as the ancestors of crocodiles. Since reptiles, first rauisuchians and then dinosaurs, dominated the Mesozoic era, the interval is popularly known as the "Age of Reptiles". The dinosaurs also developed smaller forms, including the feather-bearing smaller theropods. In the Cretaceous period, these gave rise to the first true birds.[52]

The sister group to Archosauromorpha is Lepidosauromorpha, containing lizards and tuataras, as well as their fossil relatives. Lepidosauromorpha contained at least one major group of the Mesozoic sea reptiles: the mosasaurs, which lived during the Cretaceous period. The phylogenetic placement of other main groups of fossil sea reptiles – the ichthyopterygians (including ichthyosaurs) and the sauropterygians, which evolved in the early Triassic – is more controversial. Different authors linked these groups either to lepidosauromorphs[1] or to archosauromorphs,[53][54][55] and ichthyopterygians were also argued to be diapsids that did not belong to the least inclusive clade containing lepidosauromorphs and archosauromorphs.[56]

Cenozoic reptiles

 src=
Varanus priscus was a giant carnivorous goanna lizard, perhaps as long as 7 metres and weighing up to 1940 kilograms[57]
 src=
Skeleton of Champsosaurus, a choristodere, the latest surviving order of extinct reptiles. The last known choristoderes are known from the Miocene, around 11.3 million years ago

The close of the Cretaceous period saw the demise of the Mesozoic era reptilian megafauna (see the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, also known as K-T extinction event). Of the large marine reptiles, only sea turtles were left; and of the non-marine large reptiles, only the semi-aquatic crocodiles and broadly similar choristoderes survived the extinction, with last members of the latter, the lizard-like Lazarussuchus, becoming extinct in the Miocene.[58] Of the great host of dinosaurs dominating the Mesozoic, only the small beaked birds survived. This dramatic extinction pattern at the end of the Mesozoic led into the Cenozoic. Mammals and birds filled the empty niches left behind by the reptilian megafauna and, while reptile diversification slowed, bird and mammal diversification took an exponential turn.[42] However, reptiles were still important components of the megafauna, particularly in the form of large and giant tortoises.[59][60]

After the extinction of most archosaur and marine reptile lines by the end of the Cretaceous, reptile diversification continued throughout the Cenozoic. Squamates took a massive hit during the K–Pg event, only recovering ten million years after it,[61] but they underwent a great radiation event once they recovered, and today squamates make up the majority of living reptiles (> 95%).[62][63] Approximately 10,000 extant species of traditional reptiles are known, with birds adding about 10,000 more, almost twice the number of mammals, represented by about 5,700 living species (excluding domesticated species).[64]

Morphology and physiology

Circulation

 src=
Thermographic image of monitor lizards

All lepidosaurs and turtles have a three-chambered heart consisting of two atria, one variably partitioned ventricle, and two aortas that lead to the systemic circulation. The degree of mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood in the three-chambered heart varies depending on the species and physiological state. Under different conditions, deoxygenated blood can be shunted back to the body or oxygenated blood can be shunted back to the lungs. This variation in blood flow has been hypothesized to allow more effective thermoregulation and longer diving times for aquatic species, but has not been shown to be a fitness advantage.[66]

 src=
Juvenile Iguana heart bisected through the ventricle, bisecting the left and right atrium

For example, Iguana hearts, like the majority of the squamates hearts, are composed of three chambers with two aorta and one ventricle, cardiac involuntary muscles.[67] The main structures of the heart are the sinus venosus, the pacemaker, the left atrium, the right atrium, the atrioventricular valve, the cavum venosum, cavum arteriosum, the cavum pulmonale, the muscular ridge, the ventricular ridge, pulmonary veins, and paired aortic arches.[68]

Some squamate species (e.g., pythons and monitor lizards) have three-chambered hearts that become functionally four-chambered hearts during contraction. This is made possible by a muscular ridge that subdivides the ventricle during ventricular diastole and completely divides it during ventricular systole. Because of this ridge, some of these squamates are capable of producing ventricular pressure differentials that are equivalent to those seen in mammalian and avian hearts.[69]

Crocodilians have an anatomically four-chambered heart, similar to birds, but also have two systemic aortas and are therefore capable of bypassing their pulmonary circulation.[70]

Metabolism

 src=
Sustained energy output (joules) of a typical reptile versus a similar size mammal as a function of core body temperature. The mammal has a much higher peak output, but can only function over a very narrow range of body temperature.

Modern non-avian reptiles exhibit some form of cold-bloodedness (i.e. some mix of poikilothermy, ectothermy, and bradymetabolism) so that they have limited physiological means of keeping the body temperature constant and often rely on external sources of heat. Due to a less stable core temperature than birds and mammals, reptilian biochemistry requires enzymes capable of maintaining efficiency over a greater range of temperatures than in the case for warm-blooded animals. The optimum body temperature range varies with species, but is typically below that of warm-blooded animals; for many lizards, it falls in the 24°–35 °C (75°–95 °F) range,[71] while extreme heat-adapted species, like the American desert iguana Dipsosaurus dorsalis, can have optimal physiological temperatures in the mammalian range, between 35° and 40 °C (95° and 104 °F).[72] While the optimum temperature is often encountered when the animal is active, the low basal metabolism makes body temperature drop rapidly when the animal is inactive.

As in all animals, reptilian muscle action produces heat. In large reptiles, like leatherback turtles, the low surface-to-volume ratio allows this metabolically produced heat to keep the animals warmer than their environment even though they do not have a warm-blooded metabolism.[73] This form of homeothermy is called gigantothermy; it has been suggested as having been common in large dinosaurs and other extinct large-bodied reptiles.[74][75]

The benefit of a low resting metabolism is that it requires far less fuel to sustain bodily functions. By using temperature variations in their surroundings, or by remaining cold when they do not need to move, reptiles can save considerable amounts of energy compared to endothermic animals of the same size.[76] A crocodile needs from a tenth to a fifth of the food necessary for a lion of the same weight and can live half a year without eating.[77] Lower food requirements and adaptive metabolisms allow reptiles to dominate the animal life in regions where net calorie availability is too low to sustain large-bodied mammals and birds.

It is generally assumed that reptiles are unable to produce the sustained high energy output necessary for long distance chases or flying.[78] Higher energetic capacity might have been responsible for the evolution of warm-bloodedness in birds and mammals.[79] However, investigation of correlations between active capacity and thermophysiology show a weak relationship.[80] Most extant reptiles are carnivores with a sit-and-wait feeding strategy; whether reptiles are cold blooded due to their ecology is not clear. Energetic studies on some reptiles have shown active capacities equal to or greater than similar sized warm-blooded animals.[81]

Respiratory system

X-ray fluoroscopy videos of a female American alligator showing contraction of the lungs while breathing

All reptiles breathe using lungs. Aquatic turtles have developed more permeable skin, and some species have modified their cloaca to increase the area for gas exchange.[82] Even with these adaptations, breathing is never fully accomplished without lungs. Lung ventilation is accomplished differently in each main reptile group. In squamates, the lungs are ventilated almost exclusively by the axial musculature. This is also the same musculature that is used during locomotion. Because of this constraint, most squamates are forced to hold their breath during intense runs. Some, however, have found a way around it. Varanids, and a few other lizard species, employ buccal pumping as a complement to their normal "axial breathing". This allows the animals to completely fill their lungs during intense locomotion, and thus remain aerobically active for a long time. Tegu lizards are known to possess a proto-diaphragm, which separates the pulmonary cavity from the visceral cavity. While not actually capable of movement, it does allow for greater lung inflation, by taking the weight of the viscera off the lungs.[83]

Crocodilians actually have a muscular diaphragm that is analogous to the mammalian diaphragm. The difference is that the muscles for the crocodilian diaphragm pull the pubis (part of the pelvis, which is movable in crocodilians) back, which brings the liver down, thus freeing space for the lungs to expand. This type of diaphragmatic setup has been referred to as the "hepatic piston". The airways form a number of double tubular chambers within each lung. On inhalation and exhalation air moves through the airways in the same direction, thus creating a unidirectional airflow through the lungs. A similar system is found in birds,[84] monitor lizards[85] and iguanas.[86]

Most reptiles lack a secondary palate, meaning that they must hold their breath while swallowing. Crocodilians have evolved a bony secondary palate that allows them to continue breathing while remaining submerged (and protect their brains against damage by struggling prey). Skinks (family Scincidae) also have evolved a bony secondary palate, to varying degrees. Snakes took a different approach and extended their trachea instead. Their tracheal extension sticks out like a fleshy straw, and allows these animals to swallow large prey without suffering from asphyxiation.[87]

Turtles and tortoises

 src=
Red-eared slider taking a gulp of air

How turtles and tortoises breathe has been the subject of much study. To date, only a few species have been studied thoroughly enough to get an idea of how those turtles breathe. The varied results indicate that turtles and tortoises have found a variety of solutions to this problem.

The difficulty is that most turtle shells are rigid and do not allow for the type of expansion and contraction that other amniotes use to ventilate their lungs. Some turtles, such as the Indian flapshell (Lissemys punctata), have a sheet of muscle that envelops the lungs. When it contracts, the turtle can exhale. When at rest, the turtle can retract the limbs into the body cavity and force air out of the lungs. When the turtle protracts its limbs, the pressure inside the lungs is reduced, and the turtle can suck air in. Turtle lungs are attached to the inside of the top of the shell (carapace), with the bottom of the lungs attached (via connective tissue) to the rest of the viscera. By using a series of special muscles (roughly equivalent to a diaphragm), turtles are capable of pushing their viscera up and down, resulting in effective respiration, since many of these muscles have attachment points in conjunction with their forelimbs (indeed, many of the muscles expand into the limb pockets during contraction).[88]

Breathing during locomotion has been studied in three species, and they show different patterns. Adult female green sea turtles do not breathe as they crutch along their nesting beaches. They hold their breath during terrestrial locomotion and breathe in bouts as they rest. North American box turtles breathe continuously during locomotion, and the ventilation cycle is not coordinated with the limb movements.[89] This is because they use their abdominal muscles to breathe during locomotion. The last species to have been studied is the red-eared slider, which also breathes during locomotion, but takes smaller breaths during locomotion than during small pauses between locomotor bouts, indicating that there may be mechanical interference between the limb movements and the breathing apparatus. Box turtles have also been observed to breathe while completely sealed up inside their shells.[89]

Sound production

Compared to frogs, birds and mammals, reptiles are less vocal. Sound production is usually limited to hissing, which is produced merely by forcing air though a partly closed glottis and is not considered to be a true vocalization. The ability to vocalize exists in crocodilians, and some lizards and turtles; and typically involves vibrating fold-like structures in the larynx or glottis. Some geckos and turtles possess true vocal cords, which have elastin-rich connective tissue.[90][91]

Skin

 src=
Skin of a sand lizard, showing squamate reptiles iconic scales

Reptilian skin is covered in a horny epidermis, making it watertight and enabling reptiles to live on dry land, in contrast to amphibians. Compared to mammalian skin, that of reptiles is rather thin and lacks the thick dermal layer that produces leather in mammals.[92] Exposed parts of reptiles are protected by scales or scutes, sometimes with a bony base (osteoderms), forming armor. In lepidosaurians, such as lizards and snakes, the whole skin is covered in overlapping epidermal scales. Such scales were once thought to be typical of the class Reptilia as a whole, but are now known to occur only in lepidosaurians. The scales found in turtles and crocodiles are of dermal, rather than epidermal, origin and are properly termed scutes. In turtles, the body is hidden inside a hard shell composed of fused scutes.

Lacking a thick dermis, reptilian leather is not as strong as mammalian leather. It is used in leather-wares for decorative purposes for shoes, belts and handbags, particularly crocodile skin.

Shedding

Reptiles shed their skin through a process called ecdysis which occurs continuously throughout their lifetime. In particular, younger reptiles tend to shed once every 5–6 weeks while adults shed 3–4 times a year.[93] Younger reptiles shed more because of their rapid growth rate. Once full size, the frequency of shedding drastically decreases. The process of ecdysis involves forming a new layer of skin under the old one. Proteolytic enzymes and lymphatic fluid is secreted between the old and new layers of skin. Consequently, this lifts the old skin from the new one allowing shedding to occur.[94] Snakes will shed from the head to the tail while lizards shed in a "patchy pattern".[94] Dysecdysis, a common skin disease in snakes and lizards, will occur when ecdysis, or shedding, fails.[95] There are numerous reasons why shedding fails and can be related to inadequate humidity and temperature, nutritional deficiencies, dehydration and traumatic injuries.[94] Nutritional deficiencies decrease proteolytic enzymes while dehydration reduces lymphatic fluids to separate the skin layers. Traumatic injuries on the other hand, form scars that will not allow new scales to form and disrupt the process of ecdysis.[95]

Excretion

Excretion is performed mainly by two small kidneys. In diapsids, uric acid is the main nitrogenous waste product; turtles, like mammals, excrete mainly urea. Unlike the kidneys of mammals and birds, reptile kidneys are unable to produce liquid urine more concentrated than their body fluid. This is because they lack a specialized structure called a loop of Henle, which is present in the nephrons of birds and mammals. Because of this, many reptiles use the colon to aid in the reabsorption of water. Some are also able to take up water stored in the bladder. Excess salts are also excreted by nasal and lingual salt glands in some reptiles.

In all reptiles the urinogenital ducts and the anus both empty into an organ called a cloaca. In some reptiles, a midventral wall in the cloaca may open into a urinary bladder, but not all. It is present in all turtles and tortoises as well as most lizards, but is lacking in the monitor lizard, the legless lizards. It is absent in the snakes, alligators, and crocodiles.[96]

Many turtles, tortoises, and lizards have proportionally very large bladders. Charles Darwin noted that the Galapagos tortoise had a bladder which could store up to 20% of its body weight.[97] Such adaptations are the result of environments such as remote islands and deserts where water is very scarce.[98]: 143  Other desert-dwelling reptiles have large bladders that can store a long-term reservoir of water for up to several months and aid in osmoregulation.[99]

Turtles have two or more accessory urinary bladders, located lateral to the neck of the urinary bladder and dorsal to the pubis, occupying a significant portion of their body cavity.[100] Their bladder is also usually bilobed with a left and right section. The right section is located under the liver, which prevents large stones from remaining in that side while the left section is more likely to have calculi.[101]

Digestion

 src=
A colubrid snake, Dolichophis jugularis, eating a legless lizard, Pseudopus apodus. Most reptiles are carnivorous, and many primarily eat other reptiles and small mammals.

Most reptiles are insectivorous or carnivorous and have simple and comparatively short digestive tracts due to meat being fairly simple to break down and digest. Digestion is slower than in mammals, reflecting their lower resting metabolism and their inability to divide and masticate their food.[102] Their poikilotherm metabolism has very low energy requirements, allowing large reptiles like crocodiles and large constrictors to live from a single large meal for months, digesting it slowly.[77]

While modern reptiles are predominantly carnivorous, during the early history of reptiles several groups produced some herbivorous megafauna: in the Paleozoic, the pareiasaurs; and in the Mesozoic several lines of dinosaurs.[42] Today, turtles are the only predominantly herbivorous reptile group, but several lines of agamas and iguanas have evolved to live wholly or partly on plants.[103]

Herbivorous reptiles face the same problems of mastication as herbivorous mammals but, lacking the complex teeth of mammals, many species swallow rocks and pebbles (so called gastroliths) to aid in digestion: The rocks are washed around in the stomach, helping to grind up plant matter.[103] Fossil gastroliths have been found associated with both ornithopods and sauropods, though whether they actually functioned as a gastric mill in the latter is disputed.[104][105] Salt water crocodiles also use gastroliths as ballast, stabilizing them in the water or helping them to dive.[106] A dual function as both stabilizing ballast and digestion aid has been suggested for gastroliths found in plesiosaurs.[107]

Nerves

The reptilian nervous system contains the same basic part of the amphibian brain, but the reptile cerebrum and cerebellum are slightly larger. Most typical sense organs are well developed with certain exceptions, most notably the snake's lack of external ears (middle and inner ears are present). There are twelve pairs of cranial nerves.[108] Due to their short cochlea, reptiles use electrical tuning to expand their range of audible frequencies.

Intelligence

Reptiles are generally considered less intelligent than mammals and birds.[28] The size of their brain relative to their body is much less than that of mammals, the encephalization quotient being about one tenth of that of mammals,[109] though larger reptiles can show more complex brain development. Larger lizards, like the monitors, are known to exhibit complex behavior, including cooperation[110] and cognitive abilities allowing them to optimize their foraging and territoriality over time.[111] Crocodiles have relatively larger brains and show a fairly complex social structure. The Komodo dragon is even known to engage in play,[112] as are turtles, which are also considered to be social creatures,[113] and sometimes switch between monogamy and promiscuity in their sexual behavior. One study found that wood turtles were better than white rats at learning to navigate mazes.[114] Another study found that giant tortoises are capable of learning through operant conditioning, visual discrimination and retained learned behaviors with long-term memory.[115] Sea turtles have been regarded as having simple brains, but their flippers are used for a variety of foraging tasks (holding, bracing, corralling) in common with marine mammals.[116]

Vision

Most reptiles are diurnal animals. The vision is typically adapted to daylight conditions, with color vision and more advanced visual depth perception than in amphibians and most mammals.

Reptiles usually have excellent vision, allowing them to detect shapes and motions at long distances. They often have only a few Rod cells and have poor vision in low-light conditions. At the same time they have cells called "double cones" which give them sharp color vision and enable them to see ultraviolet wavelengths.[117] In some species, such as blind snakes, vision is reduced.

Many lepidosaurs have a photosensory organ on the top of their heads called the parietal eye, which are also called third eye, pineal eye or pineal gland. This "eye" does not work the same way as a normal eye does as it has only a rudimentary retina and lens and thus, cannot form images. It is however sensitive to changes in light and dark and can detect movement.[117]

Some snakes have extra sets of visual organs (in the loosest sense of the word) in the form of pits sensitive to infrared radiation (heat). Such heat-sensitive pits are particularly well developed in the pit vipers, but are also found in boas and pythons. These pits allow the snakes to sense the body heat of birds and mammals, enabling pit vipers to hunt rodents in the dark.[118]

Most reptiles including birds possess a nictitating membrane, a translucent third eyelid which is drawn over the eye from the inner corner. Notably, it protects a crocodilian's eyeball surface while allowing a degree of vision underwater.[119] However, many squamates, geckos and snakes in particular, lack eyelids, which are replaced by a transparent scale. This is called the brille, spectacle, or eyecap. The brille is usually not visible, except for when the snake molts, and it protects the eyes from dust and dirt.[120]

Reproduction

 src=
Crocodilian egg diagram
1. eggshell, 2. yolk sac, 3. yolk (nutrients), 4. vessels, 5. amnion, 6. chorion, 7. air space, 8. allantois, 9. albumin (egg white), 10. amniotic sac, 11. crocodile embryo, 12. amniotic fluid
 src=
Common house geckos mating, ventral view with hemipenis inserted in the cloaca
 src=
Most reptiles reproduce sexually, for example this Trachylepis maculilabris skink
 src=
Reptiles have amniotic eggs with hard or leathery shells, requiring internal fertilization when mating.

Reptiles generally reproduce sexually,[121] though some are capable of asexual reproduction. All reproductive activity occurs through the cloaca, the single exit/entrance at the base of the tail where waste is also eliminated. Most reptiles have copulatory organs, which are usually retracted or inverted and stored inside the body. In turtles and crocodilians, the male has a single median penis, while squamates, including snakes and lizards, possess a pair of hemipenes, only one of which is typically used in each session. Tuatara, however, lack copulatory organs, and so the male and female simply press their cloacas together as the male discharges sperm.[122]

Most reptiles lay amniotic eggs covered with leathery or calcareous shells. An amnion, chorion, and allantois are present during embryonic life. The eggshell (1) protects the crocodile embryo (11) and keeps it from drying out, but it is flexible to allow gas exchange. The chorion (6) aids in gas exchange between the inside and outside of the egg. It allows carbon dioxide to exit the egg and oxygen gas to enter the egg. The albumin (9) further protects the embryo and serves as a reservoir for water and protein. The allantois (8) is a sac that collects the metabolic waste produced by the embryo. The amniotic sac (10) contains amniotic fluid (12) which protects and cushions the embryo. The amnion (5) aids in osmoregulation and serves as a saltwater reservoir. The yolk sac (2) surrounding the yolk (3) contains protein and fat rich nutrients that are absorbed by the embryo via vessels (4) that allow the embryo to grow and metabolize. The air space (7) provides the embryo with oxygen while it is hatching. This ensures that the embryo will not suffocate while it is hatching. There are no larval stages of development. Viviparity and ovoviviparity have evolved in many extinct clades of reptiles and in squamates. In the latter group, many species, including all boas and most vipers, utilize this mode of reproduction. The degree of viviparity varies; some species simply retain the eggs until just before hatching, others provide maternal nourishment to supplement the yolk, and yet others lack any yolk and provide all nutrients via a structure similar to the mammalian placenta. The earliest documented case of viviparity in reptiles is the Early Permian mesosaurs,[123] although some individuals or taxa in that clade may also have been oviparous because a putative isolated egg has also been found. Several groups of Mesozoic marine reptiles also exhibited viviparity, such as mosasaurs, ichthyosaurs, and Sauropterygia, a group that include pachypleurosaurs and Plesiosauria.[3]

Asexual reproduction has been identified in squamates in six families of lizards and one snake. In some species of squamates, a population of females is able to produce a unisexual diploid clone of the mother. This form of asexual reproduction, called parthenogenesis, occurs in several species of gecko, and is particularly widespread in the teiids (especially Aspidocelis) and lacertids (Lacerta). In captivity, Komodo dragons (Varanidae) have reproduced by parthenogenesis.

Parthenogenetic species are suspected to occur among chameleons, agamids, xantusiids, and typhlopids.

Some reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TDSD), in which the incubation temperature determines whether a particular egg hatches as male or female. TDSD is most common in turtles and crocodiles, but also occurs in lizards and tuatara.[124] To date, there has been no confirmation of whether TDSD occurs in snakes.[125]

Defense mechanisms

Many small reptiles, such as snakes and lizards that live on the ground or in the water, are vulnerable to being preyed on by all kinds of carnivorous animals. Thus avoidance is the most common form of defense in reptiles.[126] At the first sign of danger, most snakes and lizards crawl away into the undergrowth, and turtles and crocodiles will plunge into water and sink out of sight.

Camouflage and warning

 src=
A camouflaged Phelsuma deubia on a palm frond

Reptiles tend to avoid confrontation through camouflage. Two major groups of reptile predators are birds and other reptiles, both of which have well developed color vision. Thus the skins of many reptiles have cryptic coloration of plain or mottled gray, green, and brown to allow them to blend into the background of their natural environment.[127] Aided by the reptiles' capacity for remaining motionless for long periods, the camouflage of many snakes is so effective that people or domestic animals are most typically bitten because they accidentally step on them.[128]

When camouflage fails to protect them, blue-tongued skinks will try to ward off attackers by displaying their blue tongues, and the frill-necked lizard will display its brightly colored frill. These same displays are used in territorial disputes and during courtship.[129] If danger arises so suddenly that flight is useless, crocodiles, turtles, some lizards, and some snakes hiss loudly when confronted by an enemy. Rattlesnakes rapidly vibrate the tip of the tail, which is composed of a series of nested, hollow beads to ward off approaching danger.

In contrast to the normal drab coloration of most reptiles, the lizards of the genus Heloderma (the Gila monster and the beaded lizard) and many of the coral snakes have high-contrast warning coloration, warning potential predators they are venomous.[130] A number of non-venomous North American snake species have colorful markings similar to those of the coral snake, an oft cited example of Batesian mimicry.[131][132]

Alternative defense in snakes

Camouflage does not always fool a predator. When caught out, snake species adopt different defensive tactics and use a complicated set of behaviors when attacked. Some first elevate their head and spread out the skin of their neck in an effort to look large and threatening. Failure of this strategy may lead to other measures practiced particularly by cobras, vipers, and closely related species, which use venom to attack. The venom is modified saliva, delivered through fangs from a venom gland.[133][134] Some non-venomous snakes, such as American hognose snakes or European grass snake, play dead when in danger; some, including the grass snake, exude a foul-smelling liquid to deter attackers.[135][136]

Defense in crocodilians

When a crocodilian is concerned about its safety, it will gape to expose the teeth and yellow tongue. If this does not work, the crocodilian gets a little more agitated and typically begins to make hissing sounds. After this, the crocodilian will start to change its posture dramatically to make itself look more intimidating. The body is inflated to increase apparent size. If absolutely necessary it may decide to attack an enemy.

 src=
A White-headed dwarf gecko with shed tail

Some species try to bite immediately. Some will use their heads as sledgehammers and literally smash an opponent, some will rush or swim toward the threat from a distance, even chasing the opponent onto land or galloping after it.[137] The main weapon in all crocodiles is the bite, which can generate very high bite force. Many species also possess canine-like teeth. These are used primarily for seizing prey, but are also used in fighting and display.[138]

Shedding and regenerating tails

Geckos, skinks, and other lizards that are captured by the tail will shed part of the tail structure through a process called autotomy and thus be able to flee. The detached tail will continue to wiggle, creating a deceptive sense of continued struggle and distracting the predator's attention from the fleeing prey animal. The detached tails of leopard geckos can wiggle for up to 20 minutes.[139] In many species the tails are of a separate and dramatically more intense color than the rest of the body so as to encourage potential predators to strike for the tail first. In the shingleback skink and some species of geckos, the tail is short and broad and resembles the head, so that the predators may attack it rather than the more vulnerable front part.[140]

Reptiles that are capable of shedding their tails can partially regenerate them over a period of weeks. The new section will however contain cartilage rather than bone, and will never grow to the same length as the original tail. It is often also distinctly discolored compared to the rest of the body and may lack some of the external sculpting features seen in the original tail.[141]

Relations with humans

In cultures and religions

 src=
The 1897 painting of fighting "Laelaps" (now Dryptosaurus) by Charles R. Knight

Dinosaurs have been widely depicted in culture since the English palaeontologist Richard Owen coined the name dinosaur in 1842. As soon as 1854, the Crystal Palace Dinosaurs were on display to the public in south London.[142][143] One dinosaur appeared in literature even earlier, as Charles Dickens placed a Megalosaurus in the first chapter of his novel Bleak House in 1852.[144] The dinosaurs featured in books, films, television programs, artwork, and other media have been used for both education and entertainment. The depictions range from the realistic, as in the television documentaries of the 1990s and first decade of the 21st century, or the fantastic, as in the monster movies of the 1950s and 1960s.[143][145][146]

The snake or serpent has played a powerful symbolic role in different cultures. In Egyptian history, the Nile cobra adorned the crown of the pharaoh. It was worshipped as one of the gods and was also used for sinister purposes: murder of an adversary and ritual suicide (Cleopatra). In Greek mythology snakes are associated with deadly antagonists, as a chthonic symbol, roughly translated as earthbound. The nine-headed Lernaean Hydra that Hercules defeated and the three Gorgon sisters are children of Gaia, the earth. Medusa was one of the three Gorgon sisters who Perseus defeated. Medusa is described as a hideous mortal, with snakes instead of hair and the power to turn men to stone with her gaze. After killing her, Perseus gave her head to Athena who fixed it to her shield called the Aegis. The Titans are depicted in art with their legs replaced by bodies of snakes for the same reason: They are children of Gaia, so they are bound to the earth.[147] In Hinduism, snakes are worshipped as gods, with many women pouring milk on snake pits. The cobra is seen on the neck of Shiva, while Vishnu is depicted often as sleeping on a seven-headed snake or within the coils of a serpent. There are temples in India solely for cobras sometimes called Nagraj (King of Snakes), and it is believed that snakes are symbols of fertility. In the annual Hindu festival of Nag Panchami, snakes are venerated and prayed to.[148] In religious terms, the snake and jaguar are arguably the most important animals in ancient Mesoamerica. "In states of ecstasy, lords dance a serpent dance; great descending snakes adorn and support buildings from Chichen Itza to Tenochtitlan, and the Nahuatl word coatl meaning serpent or twin, forms part of primary deities such as Mixcoatl, Quetzalcoatl, and Coatlicue."[149] In Christianity and Judaism, a serpent appears in Genesis to tempt Adam and Eve with the forbidden fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil.[150]

The turtle has a prominent position as a symbol of steadfastness and tranquility in religion, mythology, and folklore from around the world.[151] A tortoise's longevity is suggested by its long lifespan and its shell, which was thought to protect it from any foe.[152] In the cosmological myths of several cultures a World Turtle carries the world upon its back or supports the heavens.[153]

Medicine

 src=
The Rod of Asclepius symbolizes medicine

Deaths from snakebites are uncommon in many parts of the world, but are still counted in tens of thousands per year in India.[154] Snakebite can be treated with antivenom made from the venom of the snake. To produce antivenom, a mixture of the venoms of different species of snake is injected into the body of a horse in ever-increasing dosages until the horse is immunized. Blood is then extracted; the serum is separated, purified and freeze-dried.[155] The cytotoxic effect of snake venom is being researched as a potential treatment for cancers.[156]

Lizards such as the Gila monster produce toxins with medical applications. Gila toxin reduces plasma glucose; the substance is now synthesised for use in the anti-diabetes drug exenatide (Byetta).[157] Another toxin from Gila monster saliva has been studied for use as an anti-Alzheimer's drug.[158]

Geckos have also been used as medicine, especially in China.[159] Turtles have been used in Chinese traditional medicine for thousands of years, with every part of the turtle believed to have medical benefits. There is a lack of scientific evidence that would correlate claimed medical benefits to turtle consumption. Growing demand for turtle meat has placed pressure on vulnerable wild populations of turtles.[160]

Commercial farming

Crocodiles are protected in many parts of the world, and are farmed commercially. Their hides are tanned and used to make leather goods such as shoes and handbags; crocodile meat is also considered a delicacy.[161] The most commonly farmed species are the saltwater and Nile crocodiles. Farming has resulted in an increase in the saltwater crocodile population in Australia, as eggs are usually harvested from the wild, so landowners have an incentive to conserve their habitat. Crocodile leather is made into wallets, briefcases, purses, handbags, belts, hats, and shoes. Crocodile oil has been used for various purposes.[162]

Snakes are also farmed, primarily in East and Southeast Asia, and their production has become more intensive in the last decade. Snake farming has been troubling for conservation in the past as it can lead to overexploitation of wild snakes and their natural prey to supply the farms. However, farming snakes can limit the hunting of wild snakes, while reducing the slaughter of higher-order vertebrates like cows. The energy efficiency of snakes is higher than expected for carnivores, due to their ectothermy and low metabolism. Waste protein from the poultry and pig industries is used as feed in snake farms.[163] Snake farms produce meat, snake skin, and antivenom.

Turtle farming is another known but controversial practice. Turtles have been farmed for a variety of reasons, ranging from food to traditional medicine, the pet trade, and scientific conservation. Demand for turtle meat and medicinal products is one of the main threats to turtle conservation in Asia. Though commercial breeding would seem to insulate wild populations, it can stoke the demand for them and increase wild captures.[164][160] Even the potentially appealing concept of raising turtles at a farm to release into the wild is questioned by some veterinarians who have had some experience with farm operations. They caution that this may introduce into the wild populations infectious diseases that occur on the farm, but have not (yet) been occurring in the wild.[165][166]

Reptiles in captivity

In the Western world, some snakes (especially docile species such as the ball python and corn snake) are kept as pets.[167] Numerous species of lizard are kept as pets, including bearded dragons,[168] iguanas, anoles,[169] and geckos (such as the popular leopard gecko and the crested gecko).[168]

Turtles and tortoises are an increasingly popular pet, but keeping them can be challenging due to particular requirements, such as temperature control and a varied diet, as well as the long lifespans of turtles, who can potentially outlive their owners. Good hygiene and significant maintenance is necessary when keeping reptiles, due to the risks of Salmonella and other pathogens.[170]

A herpetarium is a zoological exhibition space for reptiles or amphibians.

See also

Further reading

Notes

  1. ^ This taxonomy does not reflect modern molecular evidence, which places turtles within Diapsida.

References

  1. ^ a b Gauthier J.A. (1994): The diversification of the amniotes. In: D.R. Prothero and R.M. Schoch (ed.) Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution: 129–159. Knoxville, Tennessee: The Paleontological Society.
  2. ^ Ezcurra, M. D.; Scheyer, T. M.; Butler, R. J. (2014). "The origin and early evolution of Sauria: reassessing the Permian saurian fossil record and the timing of the crocodile-lizard divergence". PLOS ONE. 9 (2): e89165. Bibcode:2014PLoSO...989165E. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089165. PMC 3937355. PMID 24586565.
  3. ^ a b Sander, P. Martin (2012). "Reproduction in early amniotes". Science. 337 (6096): 806–808. Bibcode:2012Sci...337..806S. doi:10.1126/science.1224301. PMID 22904001. S2CID 7041966.
  4. ^ Franklin-Brown, Mary (2012). Reading the world : encyclopedic writing in the scholastic age. Chicago London: The University of Chicago Press. p. 223;377. ISBN 9780226260709.
  5. ^ Linnaeus, Carolus (1758). Systema naturae per regna tria naturae :secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis (in Latin) (10th ed.). Holmiae (Laurentii Salvii). Retrieved September 22, 2008.
  6. ^ "Amphibia". Encyclopædia Britannica (9th ed.). 1878.
  7. ^ Laurenti, J.N. (1768): Specimen Medicum, Exhibens Synopsin Reptilium Emendatam cum Experimentis circa Venena. Facsimile Archived 2015-09-04 at the Wayback Machine, showing the mixed composition of his Reptilia
  8. ^ Latreielle, P.A. (1804): Nouveau Dictionnaire à Histoire Naturelle, xxiv., cited in Latreille's Familles naturelles du règne animal, exposés succinctement et dans un ordre analytique, 1825
  9. ^ Huxley, T.H. (1863): The Structure and Classification of the Mammalia. Hunterian lectures, presented in Medical Times and Gazette, 1863. original text
  10. ^ Goodrich, E.S. (1916). "On the classification of the Reptilia". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B. 89 (615): 261–276. Bibcode:1916RSPSB..89..261G. doi:10.1098/rspb.1916.0012.
  11. ^ Watson, D.M.S. (1957). "On Millerosaurus and the early history of the sauropsid reptiles". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B. 240 (673): 325–400. Bibcode:1957RSPTB.240..325W. doi:10.1098/rstb.1957.0003.
  12. ^ Lydekker, Richard (1896). The Royal Natural History: Reptiles and Fishes. London: Frederick Warne & Son. pp. 2–3. Retrieved March 25, 2016. Lydekker Royal Natural History Reptilia.
  13. ^ a b Tudge, Colin (2000). The Variety of Life. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-860426-2.
  14. ^ Osborn, H.F. (1903). "The Reptilian subclasses Diapsida and Synapsida and Early History of Diaptosauria". Memoirs of the American Museum of Natural History. 1: 451–507.
  15. ^ Romer, A.S. (1933). Vertebrate Paleontology. University of Chicago Press., 3rd ed., 1966.
  16. ^ Tsuji, L.A.; Müller, J. (2009). "Assembling the history of the Parareptilia: phylogeny, diversification, and a new definition of the clade". Fossil Record. 12 (1): 71–81. doi:10.1002/mmng.200800011.
  17. ^ Brysse, K. (2008). "From weird wonders to stem lineages: the second reclassification of the Burgess Shale fauna". Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Biological and Biomedical Sciences. 39 (3): 298–313. doi:10.1016/j.shpsc.2008.06.004. PMID 18761282.
  18. ^ a b c d e f Modesto, S.P.; Anderson, J.S. (2004). "The phylogenetic definition of Reptilia". Systematic Biology. 53 (5): 815–821. doi:10.1080/10635150490503026. PMID 15545258.
  19. ^ Benton, Michael J. (2005). Vertebrate Palaeontology (3rd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd. ISBN 978-0-632-05637-8.
  20. ^ Benton, Michael J. (2014). Vertebrate Palaeontology (4th ed.). Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd. ISBN 978-0-632-05637-8.
  21. ^ a b c Lee, M.S.Y. (2013). "Turtle origins: Insights from phylogenetic retrofitting and molecular scaffolds". Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 26 (12): 2729–2738. doi:10.1111/jeb.12268. PMID 24256520.
  22. ^ Hideyuki Mannena & Steven S.-L. Li (1999). "Molecular evidence for a clade of turtles". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 13 (1): 144–148. doi:10.1006/mpev.1999.0640. PMID 10508547.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  23. ^ a b Zardoya, R.; Meyer, A. (1998). "Complete mitochondrial genome suggests diapsid affinities of turtles". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 95 (24): 14226–14231. Bibcode:1998PNAS...9514226Z. doi:10.1073/pnas.95.24.14226. PMC 24355. PMID 9826682.
  24. ^ a b Iwabe, N.; Hara, Y.; Kumazawa, Y.; Shibamoto, K.; Saito, Y.; Miyata, T.; Katoh, K. (2004-12-29). "Sister group relationship of turtles to the bird-crocodilian clade revealed by nuclear DNA-coded proteins". Molecular Biology and Evolution. 22 (4): 810–813. doi:10.1093/molbev/msi075. PMID 15625185.
  25. ^ a b Roos, Jonas; Aggarwal, Ramesh K.; Janke, Axel (Nov 2007). "Extended mitogenomic phylogenetic analyses yield new insight into crocodylian evolution and their survival of the Cretaceous–Tertiary boundary". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 45 (2): 663–673. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2007.06.018. PMID 17719245.
  26. ^ a b Katsu, Y.; Braun, E.L.; Guillette, L.J. Jr.; Iguchi, T. (2010-03-17). "From reptilian phylogenomics to reptilian genomes: analyses of c-Jun and DJ-1 proto-oncogenes". Cytogenetic and Genome Research. 127 (2–4): 79–93. doi:10.1159/000297715. PMID 20234127. S2CID 12116018.
  27. ^ Tyler R. Lyson, Erik A. Sperling, Alysha M. Heimberg, Jacques A. Gauthier, Benjamin L. King & Kevin J. Peterson (2012). "MicroRNAs support a turtle + lizard clade". Biology Letters. 8 (1): 104–107. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2011.0477. PMC 3259949. PMID 21775315.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  28. ^ a b c d Romer, A.S. & T.S. Parsons. 1977. The Vertebrate Body. 5th ed. Saunders, Philadelphia. (6th ed. 1985)
  29. ^ Gilbert, SF; Corfe, I (May 2013). "Turtle origins: picking up speed" (PDF). Dev. Cell. 25 (4): 326–328. doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2013.05.011. PMID 23725759.
  30. ^ Chiari, Ylenia; Cahais, Vincent; Galtier, Nicolas; Delsuc, Frédéric (2012). "Phylogenomic analyses support the position of turtles as the sister group of birds and crocodiles (Archosauria)". BMC Biology. 10 (65): 65. doi:10.1186/1741-7007-10-65. PMC 3473239. PMID 22839781.
  31. ^ Werneburg, Ingmar; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo (2009). "Timing of organogenesis support basal position of turtles in the amniote tree of life". BMC Evolutionary Biology. 9, 82: 82. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-9-82. PMC 2679012. PMID 19389226.
  32. ^ a b Laurin, M.; Reisz, R. R. (1995). "A reevaluation of early amniote phylogeny" (PDF). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 113 (2): 165–223. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1995.tb00932.x.
  33. ^ Paton, R.L.; Smithson, T.R.; Clack, J.A. (1999). "An amniote-like skeleton from the Early Carboniferous of Scotland". Nature. 398 (6727): 508–513. Bibcode:1999Natur.398..508P. doi:10.1038/19071. S2CID 204992355.
  34. ^ Monastersky, R (1999). "Out of the Swamps, How early vertebrates established a foothold – with all 10 toes – on land". Science News. 155 (21): 328–330. doi:10.2307/4011517. JSTOR 4011517. Archived from the original on June 4, 2011.
  35. ^ Chapter 6: "Walking with early tetrapods: evolution of the postcranial skeleton and the phylogenetic affinities of the Temnospondyli (Vertebrata: Tetrapoda)." In: Kat Pawley (2006). "The postcranial skeleton of temnospondyls (Tetrapoda: temnospondyli)." PhD Thesis. La Trobe University, Melbourne. hdl:1959.9/57256
  36. ^ Falcon-Lang, H.J.; Benton, M.J.; Stimson, M. (2007). "Ecology of early reptiles inferred from Lower Pennsylvanian trackways". Journal of the Geological Society. 164 (6): 1113–1118. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.1002.5009. doi:10.1144/0016-76492007-015. S2CID 140568921.
  37. ^ "Earliest Evidence For Reptiles". Sflorg.com. 2007-10-17. Archived from the original on July 16, 2011. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  38. ^ Palmer, D., ed. (1999). The Marshall Illustrated Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals. London: Marshall Editions. p. 62. ISBN 978-1-84028-152-1.
  39. ^ Ruta, M.; Coates, M.I.; Quicke, D.L.J. (2003). "Early tetrapod relationships revisited" (PDF). Biological Reviews. 78 (2): 251–345. doi:10.1017/S1464793102006103. PMID 12803423. S2CID 31298396.
  40. ^ a b Brocklehurst, Neil (July 31, 2021). "The First Age of Reptiles? Comparing Reptile and Synapsid Diversity, and the Influence of Lagerstätten, During the Carboniferous and Early Permian". Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 9. doi:10.3389/fevo.2021.669765.
  41. ^ a b Sahney, S., Benton, M.J. & Falcon-Lang, H.J. (2010). "Rainforest collapse triggered Pennsylvanian tetrapod diversification in Euramerica". Geology. 38 (12): 1079–1082. Bibcode:2010Geo....38.1079S. doi:10.1130/G31182.1.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  42. ^ a b c Sahney, S., Benton, M.J. and Ferry, P.A. (2010). "Links between global taxonomic diversity, ecological diversity and the expansion of vertebrates on land". Biology Letters. 6 (4): 544–547. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2009.1024. PMC 2936204. PMID 20106856.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  43. ^ a b Coven, R (2000): History of Life. Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK. p 154 from Google Books
  44. ^ Juan C. Cisneros, Ross Damiani, Cesar Schultz, Átila da Rosa, Cibele Schwanke, Leopoldo W. Neto and Pedro L.P. Aurélio (2004). "A procolophonoid reptile with temporal fenestration from the Middle Triassic of Brazil". Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 271 (1547): 1541–1546. doi:10.1098/rspb.2004.2748. PMC 1691751. PMID 15306328.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  45. ^ Linda A. Tsuji & Johannes Müller (2009). "Assembling the history of the Parareptilia: phylogeny, diversification, and a new definition of the clade". Fossil Record. 12 (1): 71–81. doi:10.1002/mmng.200800011.
  46. ^ a b Graciela Piñeiro, Jorge Ferigolo, Alejandro Ramos and Michel Laurin (2012). "Cranial morphology of the Early Permian mesosaurid Mesosaurus tenuidens and the evolution of the lower temporal fenestration reassessed". Comptes Rendus Palevol. 11 (5): 379–391. doi:10.1016/j.crpv.2012.02.001.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  47. ^ van Tuninen, M.; Hadly, E.A. (2004). "Error in Estimation of Rate and Time Inferred from the Early Amniote Fossil Record and Avian Molecular Clocks". Journal of Molecular Biology. 59 (2): 267–276. Bibcode:2004JMolE..59..267V. doi:10.1007/s00239-004-2624-9. PMID 15486700. S2CID 25065918.
  48. ^ Benton, M.J. (2000). Vertebrate Paleontology (2nd ed.). London: Blackwell Science Ltd. ISBN 978-0-632-05614-9., 3rd ed. 2004 ISBN 978-0-632-05637-8
  49. ^ Rieppel O, DeBraga M (1996). "Turtles as diapsid reptiles". Nature. 384 (6608): 453–455. Bibcode:1996Natur.384..453R. doi:10.1038/384453a0. S2CID 4264378.
  50. ^ a b Colbert, E.H. & Morales, M. (2001): Colbert's Evolution of the Vertebrates: A History of the Backboned Animals Through Time. 4th edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc, New York. ISBN 978-0-471-38461-8.
  51. ^ a b Sahney, S. & Benton, M.J. (2008). "Recovery from the most profound mass extinction of all time". Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 275 (1636): 759–765. doi:10.1098/rspb.2007.1370. PMC 2596898. PMID 18198148.
  52. ^ Lee, Michael SY; Cau, Andrea; Darren, Naish; Gareth J., Dyke (2013). "Morphological Clocks in Paleontology, and a Mid-Cretaceous Origin of Crown Aves". Systematic Biology. 63 (3): 442–449. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syt110. PMID 24449041.
  53. ^ John W. Merck (1997). "A phylogenetic analysis of the euryapsid reptiles". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 17 (Supplement to 3): 1–93. doi:10.1080/02724634.1997.10011028.
  54. ^ Sean Modesto; Robert Reisz; Diane Scott (2011). "A neodiapsid reptile from the Lower Permian of Oklahoma". Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 71st Annual Meeting Program and Abstracts: 160.
  55. ^ "GEOL 331 Vertebrate Paleontology II: Fossil Tetrapods". www.geol.umd.edu.
  56. ^ Ryosuke Motani; Nachio Minoura; Tatsuro Ando (1998). "Ichthyosaurian relationships illuminated by new primitive skeletons from Japan". Nature. 393 (6682): 255–257. Bibcode:1998Natur.393..255M. doi:10.1038/30473. S2CID 4416186.
  57. ^ Molnar, Ralph E. (2004). Dragons in the dust: the paleobiology of the giant monitor lizard Megalania. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-34374-1.
  58. ^ Evans, Susan E.; Klembara, Jozef (2005). "A choristoderan reptile (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Lower Miocene of northwest Bohemia (Czech Republic)". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25 (1): 171–184. doi:10.1671/0272-4634(2005)025[0171:ACRRDF]2.0.CO;2.
  59. ^ Hansen, D.M.; Donlan, C.J.; Griffiths, C.J.; Campbell, K.J. (April 2010). "Ecological history and latent conservation potential: large and giant tortoises as a model for taxon substitutions". Ecography. 33 (2): 272–284. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0587.2010.06305.x.
  60. ^ Cione, A.L.; Tonni, E.P.; Soibelzon, L. (2003). "The Broken Zig-Zag: Late Cenozoic large mammal and tortoise extinction in South America". Rev. Mus. Argentino Cienc. Nat. N.S. 5 (1): 1–19. doi:10.22179/REVMACN.5.26.
  61. ^ Longrich, Nicholas R.; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S.; Gauthier, Jacques A. (2012). "Mass extinction of lizards and snakes at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 109 (52): 21396–21401. Bibcode:2012PNAS..10921396L. doi:10.1073/pnas.1211526110. PMC 3535637. PMID 23236177.
  62. ^ "The Reptile Database". Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  63. ^ Tod W. Reeder, Ted M. Townsend, Daniel G. Mulcahy, Brice P. Noonan, Perry L. Wood Jr., Jack W. Sites Jr. & John J. Wiens (2015). "Integrated analyses resolve conflicts over squamate reptile phylogeny and reveal unexpected placements for fossil taxa". PLOS One. 10 (3): e0118199. Bibcode:2015PLoSO..1018199R. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0118199. PMC 4372529. PMID 25803280.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  64. ^ "Numbers of threatened species by major groups of organisms (1996–2012)" (PDF). IUCN Red List, 2010. IUCN. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 4, 2013. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  65. ^ Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel; Bauer, Aaron M.; Meiri, Shai; Uetz, Peter (2013-03-27). "Global Taxonomic Diversity of Living Reptiles". PLOS ONE. 8 (3): e59741. Bibcode:2013PLoSO...859741P. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059741. ISSN 1932-6203. PMC 3609858. PMID 23544091.
  66. ^ Hicks, James (2002). "The Physiological and Evolutionary Significance of Cardiovascular Shunting Patterns in Reptiles". News in Physiological Sciences. 17 (6): 241–245. doi:10.1152/nips.01397.2002. PMID 12433978. S2CID 20040550.
  67. ^ DABVP, Ryan S. De Voe DVM MSpVM DACZM. "Reptilian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology: evaluation and monitoring (Proceedings)". dvm360.com. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  68. ^ "Iguana Internal Body Parts". Reptile & Parrots Forum. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  69. ^ Wang, Tobias; Altimiras, Jordi; Klein, Wilfried; Axelsson, Michael (2003). "Ventricular haemodynamics in Python molurus: separation of pulmonary and systemic pressures". The Journal of Experimental Biology. 206 (Pt 23): 4242–4245. doi:10.1242/jeb.00681. PMID 14581594.
  70. ^ Axelsson, Michael; Craig E. Franklin (1997). "From anatomy to angioscopy: 164 years of crocodilian cardiovascular research, recent advances, and speculations". Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A. 188 (1): 51–62. doi:10.1016/S0300-9629(96)00255-1.
  71. ^ Huey, R.B. & Bennett, A.F. (1987):Phylogenetic studies of coadaptation: Preferred temperatures versus optimal performance temperatures of lizards. Evolution No. 4, vol 5: pp. 1098–1115 PDF
  72. ^ Huey, R.B. (1982): Temperature, physiology, and the ecology of reptiles. Side 25–91. In Gans, C. & Pough, F.H. (red), Biology of the Reptili No. 12, Physiology (C). Academic Press, London.artikkel
  73. ^ Spotila J.R. & Standora, E.A. (1985) Environmental constraints on the thermal energetics of sea turtles. 'Copeia 3: 694–702
  74. ^ Paladino, F.V.; Spotila, J.R & Dodson, P. (1999): A blueprint for giants: modeling the physiology of large dinosaurs. The Complete Dinosaur. Bloomington, Indiana University Press. pp. 491–504. ISBN 978-0-253-21313-6.
  75. ^ Spotila, J.R.; O'Connor, M.P.; Dodson, P.; Paladino, F.V. (1991). "Hot and cold running dinosaurs: body size, metabolism and migration". Modern Geology. 16: 203–227.
  76. ^ Campbell, N.A. & Reece, J.B. (2006): Outlines & Highlights for Essential Biology. Academic Internet Publishers. 396 pp. ISBN 978-0-8053-7473-5
  77. ^ a b Garnett, S. T. (2009). "Metabolism and survival of fasting Estuarine crocodiles". Journal of Zoology. 4 (208): 493–502. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.1986.tb01518.x.
  78. ^ Willmer, P., Stone, G. & Johnston, I.A. (2000): Environmental physiology of animals. Blackwell Science Ltd, London. 644 pp. ISBN 978-0-632-03517-5
  79. ^ Bennett, A.; Ruben, J. (1979). "Endothermy and Activity in Vertebrates" (PDF). Science. 206 (4419): 649–654. Bibcode:1979Sci...206..649B. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.551.4016. doi:10.1126/science.493968. PMID 493968.
  80. ^ Farmer, C.G. (2000). "Parental Care: The Key to Understanding Endothermy and Other Convergent Features in Birds and Mammals". American Naturalist. 155 (3): 326–334. doi:10.1086/303323. PMID 10718729. S2CID 17932602.
  81. ^ Hicks, J; Farmer, CG (1999). "Gas Exchange Potential in Reptilian Lungs: Implications for the Dinosaur-Avian Connection". Respiratory Physiology. 117 (2–3): 73–83. doi:10.1016/S0034-5687(99)00060-2. PMID 10563436.
  82. ^ Orenstein, Ronald (2001). Turtles, Tortoises & Terrapins: Survivors in Armor. Firefly Books. ISBN 978-1-55209-605-5.
  83. ^ Klein, Wilfied; Abe, Augusto; Andrade, Denis; Perry, Steven (2003). "Structure of the posthepatic septum and its influence on visceral topology in the tegu lizard, Tupinambis merianae (Teidae: Reptilia)". Journal of Morphology. 258 (2): 151–157. doi:10.1002/jmor.10136. PMID 14518009. S2CID 9901649.
  84. ^ Farmer, CG; Sanders, K (2010). "Unidirectional airflow in the lungs of alligators". Science. 327 (5963): 338–340. Bibcode:2010Sci...327..338F. doi:10.1126/science.1180219. PMID 20075253. S2CID 206522844.
  85. ^ Schachner, E.R.; Cieri, R.L.; Butler, J.P.; Farmer, C.G. (2013). "Unidirectional pulmonary airflow patterns in the savannah monitor lizard". Nature. 506 (7488): 367–370. Bibcode:2014Natur.506..367S. doi:10.1038/nature12871. PMID 24336209. S2CID 4456381.
  86. ^ Robert L. Cieri, Brent A. Craven, Emma R. Schachner & C.G. Farmer (2014). "New insight into the evolution of the vertebrate respiratory system and the discovery of unidirectional airflow in iguana lungs". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 111 (48): 17218–17223. Bibcode:2014PNAS..11117218C. doi:10.1073/pnas.1405088111. PMC 4260542. PMID 25404314.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)open access
  87. ^ Chiodini, Rodrick J.; Sundberg, John P.; Czikowsky, Joyce A. (January 1982). Timmins, Patricia (ed.). "Gross anatomy of snakes". Veterinary Medicine/Small Animal Clinician – via ResearchGate.
  88. ^ Lyson, Tyler R.; Schachner, Emma R.; Botha-Brink, Jennifer; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Lambertz, Markus; Bever, G.S.; Rubidge, Bruce S.; de Queiroz, Kevin (2014). "Origin of the unique ventilatory apparatus of turtles" (PDF). Nature Communications. 5 (5211): 5211. Bibcode:2014NatCo...5.5211L. doi:10.1038/ncomms6211. PMID 25376734.open access
  89. ^ a b Landberg, Tobias; Mailhot, Jeffrey; Brainerd, Elizabeth (2003). "Lung ventilation during treadmill locomotion in a terrestrial turtle, Terrapene carolina". Journal of Experimental Biology. 206 (19): 3391–3404. doi:10.1242/jeb.00553. PMID 12939371.
  90. ^ Russell, Anthony P.; Bauer, Aaron M. (2020). "Vocalization by extant nonavian reptiles: A synthetic overview of phonation and the vocal apparatus". The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology. 304 (7): 1478–1528. doi:10.1002/ar.24553. PMID 33099849. S2CID 225069598.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  91. ^ Capshaw, Grace; Willis, Katie L.; Han, Dawei; Bierman, Hilary S. (2020). "Reptile sound production and perception". In Rosenfeld, Cheryl S.; Hoffmann, Frauke (ed.). Neuroendocrine Regulation of Animal Vocalization. Academic Press. pp. 101–118. ISBN 978-0128151600.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  92. ^ Hildebran, M. & Goslow, G. (2001): Analysis of Vertebrate Structure. 5th edition. John Wiley & sons inc, New York. 635 pp. ISBN 978-0-471-29505-1
  93. ^ Paterson, Sue (December 17, 2007). Skin Diseases of Exotic Pets. Blackwell Science, Ltd. pp. 74–79. ISBN 9780470752432.
  94. ^ a b c Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Haesbrouck, Freddy; Martel, An (July 2012). "Dermatological Diseases in Lizards". The Veterinary Journal. 193 (1): 38–45. doi:10.1016/j.tvjl.2012.02.001. PMID 22417690.
  95. ^ a b Girling, Simon (June 26, 2013). Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets (2 ed.). Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. ISBN 9781118782941.
  96. ^ Herbert W. Rand (1950). The Chordates. Balkiston.
  97. ^ P.J. Bentley (14 March 2013). Endocrines and Osmoregulation: A Comparative Account in Vertebrates. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-3-662-05014-9.
  98. ^ Paré, Jean (January 11, 2006). "Reptile Basics: Clinical Anatomy 101" (PDF). Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference. 20: 1657–1660.
  99. ^ Davis, Jon R.; DeNardo, Dale F. (2007-04-15). "The urinary bladder as a physiological reservoir that moderates dehydration in a large desert lizard, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum". Journal of Experimental Biology. 210 (8): 1472–1480. doi:10.1242/jeb.003061. ISSN 0022-0949. PMID 17401130.
  100. ^ Wyneken, Jeanette; Witherington, Dawn (February 2015). "Urogenital System" (PDF). Anatomy of Sea Turtles. 1: 153–165.
  101. ^ Divers, Stephen J.; Mader, Douglas R. (2005). Reptile Medicine and Surgery. Amsterdam: Elsevier Health Sciences. pp. 481, 597. ISBN 9781416064770.
  102. ^ Karasov, W.H. (1986). "Nutrient requirement and the design and function of guts in fish, reptiles and mammals". In Dejours, P.; Bolis, L.; Taylor, C.R.; Weibel, E.R. (eds.). Comparative Physiology: Life in Water and on Land. Liviana Press/Springer Verlag. pp. 181–191. ISBN 978-0-387-96515-4. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  103. ^ a b King, Gillian (1996). Reptiles and herbivory (1 ed.). London: Chapman & Hall. ISBN 978-0-412-46110-1.
  104. ^ Cerda, Ignacio A. (1 June 2008). "Gastroliths in An Ornithopod Dinosaur". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 53 (2): 351–355. doi:10.4202/app.2008.0213.
  105. ^ Wings, O.; Sander, P.M. (7 March 2007). "No gastric mill in sauropod dinosaurs: new evidence from analysis of gastrolith mass and function in ostriches". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 274 (1610): 635–640. doi:10.1098/rspb.2006.3763. PMC 2197205. PMID 17254987.open access
  106. ^ Henderson, Donald M (1 August 2003). "Effects of stomach stones on the buoyancy and equilibrium of a floating crocodilian: a computational analysis". Canadian Journal of Zoology. 81 (8): 1346–1357. doi:10.1139/z03-122.
  107. ^ McHenry, C.R. (7 October 2005). "Bottom-Feeding Plesiosaurs". Science. 310 (5745): 75. doi:10.1126/science.1117241. PMID 16210529. S2CID 28832109.open access
  108. ^ "de beste bron van informatie over cultural institution. Deze website is te koop!". Curator.org. Archived from the original on September 17, 2009. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  109. ^ Jerison, Harry J. "Figure of relative brain size in vertebrates". Brainmuseum.org. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  110. ^ King, Dennis & Green, Brian. 1999. Goannas: The Biology of Varanid Lizards. University of New South Wales Press. ISBN 978-0-86840-456-1, p. 43.
  111. ^ "Latency in Problem Solving as Evidence for Learning in Varanid and Helodermatid Lizards, with Comments on Foraging Techniques". ResearchGate. Retrieved 2020-02-20.
  112. ^ Tim Halliday (Editor), Kraig Adler (Editor) (2002). Firefly Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. Hove: Firefly Books Ltd. pp. 112–113, 144, 147, 168–169. ISBN 978-1-55297-613-5. {{cite book}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  113. ^ "Even turtles need recess: Many animals – not just dogs, cats, and monkeys – need a little play time". ScienceDaily. Retrieved 2020-02-20.
  114. ^ Angier, Natalie (December 16, 2006). "Ask Science". The New York Times. Retrieved September 15, 2013.
  115. ^ Gutnick, Tamar; Weissenbacher, Anton; Kuba, Michael J. (2020). "The underestimated giants: operant conditioning, visual discrimination and long-term memory in giant tortoises". Animal Cognition. 23 (1): 159–167. doi:10.1007/s10071-019-01326-6. ISSN 1435-9456. PMID 31720927. S2CID 207962281.
  116. ^ "Sea turtles use flippers to manipulate food". ScienceDaily. Retrieved 2020-02-20.
  117. ^ a b Brames, Henry (2007). "Aspects of Light and Reptile Immunity". Iguana: Conservation, Natural History, and Husbandry of Reptiles. International Reptile Conservation Foundation. 14 (1): 19–23.
  118. ^ "Northern copperhead". Smithsonian's National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute. 25 April 2016. Retrieved 12 February 2020. The copperhead is a pit viper and, like others pit vipers, it has heat-sensitive pit organs on each side of its head between the eye and the nostril. These pits detect objects that are warmer than the environment and enable copperheads to locate nocturnal, mammalian prey.
  119. ^ "Nictitating membrane | anatomy". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2020-02-20.
  120. ^ "Catalina Island Conservancy". www.catalinaconservancy.org. Retrieved 2020-02-20.
  121. ^ "Male reproductive behaviour of Naja oxiana (Eichwald, 1831) in captivity, with a case of unilateral hemipenile prolapse". Herpetology Notes. 2018.
  122. ^ Lutz, Dick (2005), Tuatara: A Living Fossil, Salem, Oregon: DIMI Press, ISBN 978-0-931625-43-5
  123. ^ Piñeiro, G.; Ferigolo, J.; Meneghel, M.; Laurin, M. (2012). "The oldest known amniotic embryos suggest viviparity in mesosaurs". Historical Biology. 24 (6): 620–630. doi:10.1080/08912963.2012.662230. S2CID 59475679.
  124. ^ FireFly Encyclopedia Of Reptiles And Amphibians. Richmond Hill, Ontario: Firefly Books Ltd. 2008. pp. 117–118. ISBN 978-1-55407-366-5.
  125. ^ Chadwick, Derek; Goode, Jamie (2002). The genetics and biology of sex ... ISBN 978-0-470-84346-8. Retrieved March 16, 2010 – via Google Books.
  126. ^ "reptile (animal) :: Behaviour". Britannica.com. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  127. ^ "Reptile and Amphibian Defense Systems". Teachervision.fen.com. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  128. ^ Nagel, Salomé (2012). "Haemostatic function of dogs naturally envenomed by African puffadder (Bitis arietans) or snouted cobra (Naja annulifera)". MedVet Thesis at the University of Pretoria: 66. Retrieved August 18, 2014.
  129. ^ Cogger, Harold G. (1986). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. 2 Aquatic Drive Frenchs Forest NSW 2086: Reed Books PTY LTD. p. 238. ISBN 978-0-7301-0088-1.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location (link)
  130. ^ North American wildlife. New York: Marshall Cavendish Reference. 2011. p. 86. ISBN 978-0-76147-938-3. Retrieved August 18, 2014.
  131. ^ Brodie III, Edmund D (1993). "Differential avoidance of coral snake banded patterns by free-ranging avian predators in Costa Rica". Evolution. 47 (1): 227–235. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1993.tb01212.x. JSTOR 2410131. PMID 28568087. S2CID 7159917.
  132. ^ Brodie III, Edmund D., Moore, Allen J. (1995). "Experimental studies of coral snake mimicry: do snakes mimic millipedes?". Animal Behaviour. 49 (2): 534–536. doi:10.1006/anbe.1995.0072. S2CID 14576682.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  133. ^ (Edited by) Bauchot, Roland (1994). Snakes: A Natural History. Sterling Publishing. pp. 194–209. ISBN 978-1-4027-3181-5. {{cite book}}: |last= has generic name (help)
  134. ^ Casewell, N.R.; Wuster, W.; Vonk, F.J.; Harrison, R.A.; Fry, B.G. (2013). "Complex cocktails: the evolutionary novelty of venoms". Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 28 (4): 219–229. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2012.10.020. PMID 23219381.
  135. ^ Milius, Susan (October 28, 2006). "Why Play Dead?". Science News. 170 (18): 280–281. doi:10.2307/4017568. JSTOR 4017568. S2CID 85722243.
  136. ^ Cooke, Fred (2004). The Encyclopedia of Animals: A Complete Visual Guide. University of California Press. p. 405. ISBN 978-0-520-24406-1.
  137. ^ "Animal Planet :: Ferocious Crocs". Animal.discovery.com. 2008-09-10. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  138. ^ Erickson, Gregory M.; Gignac, Paul M.; Steppan, Scott J.; Lappin, A. Kristopher; Vliet, Kent A.; Brueggen, John D.; Inouye, Brian D.; Kledzik, David; Webb, Grahame J.W.; Claessens, Leon (2012). "Insights into the Ecology and Evolutionary Success of Crocodilians Revealed through Bite-Force and Tooth-Pressure Experimentation". PLOS ONE. 7 (3): e31781. Bibcode:2012PLoSO...731781E. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031781. PMC 3303775. PMID 22431965.open access
  139. ^ Marshall, Michael. "Zoologger: Gecko's amputated tail has life of its own". New Scientist Life. New Scientist. Retrieved August 18, 2014.
  140. ^ Pianka, Eric R.; Vitt, Laurie J. (2003). Lizards: Windows to the Evolution of Diversity (Organisms and Environments, 5). Vol. 5 (1 ed.). California: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-23401-7.
  141. ^ Alibardi, Lorenzo (2010). Morphological and cellular aspects of tail and limb regeneration in lizards a model system with implications for tissue regeneration in mammals. Advances in Anatomy, Embryology, and Cell Biology. Vol. 207. Heidelberg: Springer. pp. iii, v–x, 1–109. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-03733-7_1. ISBN 978-3-642-03733-7. PMID 20334040.
  142. ^ Torrens, Hugh. "Politics and Paleontology". The Complete Dinosaur, 175–190.
  143. ^ a b Glut, Donald F.; Brett-Surman, Michael K. (1997). "Dinosaurs and the media". The Complete Dinosaur. Indiana University Press. pp. 675–706. ISBN 978-0-253-33349-0.
  144. ^ Dickens, Charles J.H. (1852). Bleak House, Chapter I: In Chancery . London: Bradbury & Evans. p. 1. ISBN 978-1-85326-082-7. Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln's Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets, as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth, and it would not be wonderful to meet a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborne Hill
  145. ^ Paul, Gregory S. (2000). "The Art of Charles R. Knight". In Paul, Gregory S. (ed.). The Scientific American Book of Dinosaurs. St. Martin's Press. pp. 113–118. ISBN 978-0-312-26226-6.
  146. ^ Searles, Baird (1988). "Dinosaurs and others". Films of Science Fiction and Fantasy. New York: AFI Press. pp. 104–116. ISBN 978-0-8109-0922-9.
  147. ^ Bullfinch, Thomas (2000). Bullfinch's Complete Mythology. London: Chancellor Press. p. 85. ISBN 978-0-7537-0381-6. Archived from the original on 2009-02-09.
  148. ^ Deane, John (1833). The Worship of the Serpent. Kessinger Publishing. pp. 61–64. ISBN 978-1-56459-898-1.
  149. ^ The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya. Miller, Mary 1993 Thames & Hudson. London ISBN 978-0-500-27928-1
  150. ^ Genesis 3:1
  151. ^ Plotkin, Pamela, T., 2007, Biology and Conservation of Ridley Sea Turtles, Johns Hopkins University, ISBN 0-8018-8611-2.
  152. ^ Ball, Catherine, 2004, Animal Motifs in Asian Art, Courier Dover Publications, ISBN 0-486-43338-2.
  153. ^ Stookey, Lorena Laura, 2004, Thematic Guide to World Mythology, Greenwood Press, ISBN 978-0-313-31505-3.
  154. ^ Sinha, Kounteya (25 July 2006). "No more the land of snake charmers..." The Times of India.
  155. ^ Dubinsky, I (1996). "Rattlesnake bite in a patient with horse allergy and von Willebrand's disease: case report". Can Fam Physician. 42: 2207–2211. PMC 2146932. PMID 8939322.
  156. ^ Vivek Kumar Vyas, Keyur Brahmbahtt, Ustav Parmar; Brahmbhatt; Bhatt; Parmar (February 2012). "Therapeutic potential of snake venom in cancer therapy: current perspective". Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine. 3 (2): 156–162. doi:10.1016/S2221-1691(13)60042-8. PMC 3627178. PMID 23593597.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  157. ^ Casey, Constance (26 April 2013). "Don't Call It a Monster". Slate.
  158. ^ "Alzheimer's research seeks out lizards". BBC. 5 April 2002.
  159. ^ Wagner, P.; Dittmann, A. (2014). "Medicinal use of Gekko gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) has an impact on agamid lizards". Salamandra. 50 (3): 185–186.open access
  160. ^ a b "The threat of traditional medicine: China's boom may mean doom for turtles". Mongabay Environmental News. 2014-08-08. Retrieved 2020-01-16.
  161. ^ Lyman, Rick (November 30, 1998). "Anahuac Journal; Alligator Farmer Feeds Demand for All the Parts". The New York Times. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  162. ^ Janos, Elisabeth (2004). Country Folk Medicine: Tales of Skunk Oil, Sassafras Tea, and Other Old-time Remedies (1 ed.). Lyon's Press. p. 56. ISBN 978-1-59228-178-7.
  163. ^ Aust, Patrick W.; Tri, Ngo Van; Natusch, Daniel J. D.; Alexander, Graham J. (2017). "Asian snake farms: conservation curse or sustainable enterprise?". Oryx. 51 (3): 498–505. doi:10.1017/S003060531600034X. ISSN 0030-6053.
  164. ^ Haitao, Shi; Parham, James F.; Zhiyong, Fan; Meiling, Hong; Feng, Yin (2008). "Evidence for the massive scale of turtle farming in China". Oryx. 42 (1): 147–150. doi:10.1017/S0030605308000562. ISSN 1365-3008.
  165. ^ "GUEST EDITORIAL: MARINE TURTLE FARMING AND HEALTH ISSUES", Marine Turtle Newsletter, 72: 13–15, 1996
  166. ^ "This Turtle Tourist Center Also Raises Endangered Turtles for Meat". National Geographic News. 2017-05-25. Retrieved 2020-01-16.
  167. ^ Ernest, Carl; George R. Zug; Molly Dwyer Griffin (1996). Snakes in Question: The Smithsonian Answer Book. Smithsonian Books. p. 203. ISBN 978-1-56098-648-5.
  168. ^ a b Virata, John B. "5 Great Beginner Pet Lizards". Reptiles Magazine. Retrieved 28 May 2017.
  169. ^ McLeod, Lianne. "An Introduction to Green Anoles as Pets". The Spruce. Retrieved 28 May 2017.
  170. ^ "Turtles can make great pets, but do your homework first". phys.org. Retrieved 2020-01-15.
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Reptile: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Reptiles, as most commonly defined, are the animals in the class Reptilia (/rɛpˈtɪliə/), a paraphyletic grouping comprising all sauropsid amniotes except Aves (birds). Living reptiles comprise turtles, crocodilians, squamates (lizards and snakes) and rhynchocephalians (tuatara). In the traditional Linnaean classification system, birds are considered a separate class to reptiles. However, crocodilians are more closely related to birds than they are to other living reptiles, and so modern cladistic classification systems include birds within Reptilia, redefining the term as a clade. Other cladistic definitions abandon the term reptile altogether in favor of the clade Sauropsida, which refers to all animals more closely related to modern reptiles than to mammals. The study of the traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology.

The earliest known proto-reptiles originated around 312 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, having evolved from advanced reptiliomorph tetrapods which became increasingly adapted to life on dry land. The earliest known eureptile ("true reptile") was Hylonomus, a small and superficially lizard-like animal. Genetic and fossil data argues that the two largest lineages of reptiles, Archosauromorpha (crocodilians, birds and kin) and Lepidosauromorpha (lizards and kin), diverged near the end of the Permian period. In addition to the living reptiles, there are many diverse groups that are now extinct, in some cases due to mass extinction events. In particular, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event wiped out the pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, and all non-avian dinosaurs alongside many species of crocodyliforms, and squamates (e.g., mosasaurs). Modern non-bird reptiles inhabit all the continents except Antarctica.

Reptiles are tetrapod vertebrates, creatures that either have four limbs or, like snakes, are descended from four-limbed ancestors. Unlike amphibians, reptiles do not have an aquatic larval stage. Most reptiles are oviparous, although several species of squamates are viviparous, as were some extinct aquatic clades – the fetus develops within the mother, using a (non-mammalian) placenta rather than contained in an eggshell. As amniotes, reptile eggs are surrounded by membranes for protection and transport, which adapt them to reproduction on dry land. Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals, with some providing initial care for their hatchlings. Extant reptiles range in size from a tiny gecko, Sphaerodactylus ariasae, which can grow up to 17 mm (0.7 in) to the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, which can reach 6 m (19.7 ft) in length and weigh over 1,000 kg (2,200 lb).

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Reptile

provided by wikipedia FR

Reptilia

Les reptiles, au sens courant, regroupent des animaux à température variable (ectothermes), au corps souvent allongé et recouvert d'écailles. Ce groupement, autrefois désigné sous le taxon des Reptilia, incluait aussi des animaux comme les dinosaures non aviens, les ptérosaures, les ichthyosaures, les plésiosaures et les pliosaures, mais s'est révélé être non pertinent avec l'essor de la cladistique. Depuis l'apparition de la classification phylogénétique, un nombre croissant de chercheurs considèrent que le concept de « reptile » ne doit plus être utilisé dans la classification scientifique des espèces car il ne désigne pas un groupe monophylétique (constitué d'un ancêtre commun « reptilien » et de tous ses descendants), mais forme un regroupement paraphylétique d'espèces semblables par les caractères de l'ectothermie et des écailles, alors que les ancêtres communs de ce groupe ont aussi produit une descendance qui en est pourtant exclue car ne possédant pas de tels caractères : les oiseaux et les mammifères. Dans sa définition classique, les Reptilia sont en effet circonscrits à quatre ordres d'espèces contemporaines :

Ces lignées sont pourtant plus éloignées entre elles qu'avec d'autres lignées jugées non « reptiliennes » : par exemple, les crocodiliens sont plus proches des oiseaux — ils partagent notamment la présence d'une membrane nictitante et d'un gésier — qu'ils ne le sont des lézards ou des tortues. De plus, certains groupes fossiles autrefois considérés comme des « reptiles » possèdent des caractéristiques que n'ont pas les reptiles actuels : les ichtyosaures se sont révélés avoir été vivipares ; d'autres tels les ptérosaures étaient velus et enfin les dinosaures ont révélé parmi eux des formes à température constante (homéothermes) et parmi eux, les théropodes ont donné naissance aux oiseaux. C'est pourquoi depuis les années 1980 et l'essor d'une systématique essayant de retracer les relations de parenté entre les organismes, le regroupement des reptiles en tant que taxon a été abandonné par une majorité des scientifiques. Cet abandon a d'abord été acté dans le monde universitaire, avant d'être introduit dans le système scolaire dont l'enseignement primaire et secondaire français. En revanche, il est toujours largement utilisé dans le langage courant et comme une classe pratique dans la systématique évolutionniste, une école de taxinomie aujourd'hui minoritaire mais toujours active.

L'étude de ces animaux forme une des deux branches de l'herpétologie, l'autre étant l'étude des amphibiens, anciennement rapprochés des reptiles. Les premiers animaux à pouvoir être placés dans cette classe sont apparus sur Terre dès le Carbonifère, en même temps que les amniotes. Premiers vertébrés à pouvoir coloniser le milieu terrestre, ils se diversifient rapidement en de nombreuses espèces. Les reptiles sont aujourd'hui bien représentés avec plus de 9 000 espèces répertoriées en 2011, localisées surtout à proximité des tropiques, mais la vision traditionnelle selon laquelle le Mésozoïque aurait été un « âge des reptiles » suivi par un « âge des mammifères » est abandonnée, et l'on considère aujourd'hui qu'un « âge des dinosaures et des mammifères » a commencé au Trias et se poursuit de nos jours (puisque les oiseaux sont des dinosaures), tandis que le véritable « âge des reptiles » se place avant cela, au Permien, pour s'estomper au Trias.

Les reptiles ont, depuis toujours, intrigué ou fasciné les humains. Parce que certains sont capables de dévorer des humains (crocodiliens, grands varans) ou bien disposent de venins potentiellement mortels, parfois les reptiles inquiètent et font peur, parfois ils suscitent des phobies, mais d'autres fois ils sont sacralisés et sont l'objet d'une symbolique complexe. Omniprésents dans les mythologies du monde entier, ils ont inspiré l'imaginaire humain, servant par exemple de modèles aux dragons. D'autres suscitent de la sympathie, par exemple les tortues qui, dans certaines mythes, portent le monde sur leur dos. Depuis les dernières décennies, l'élevage de reptiles se développe dans le monde, pour fournir le marché de la viande dans certains pays consommateurs, mais surtout les marchés de la maroquinerie de luxe, qui utilise leurs peaux, et celui des nouveaux animaux de compagnie. Toutefois, le braconnage est également très répandu et met en danger de nombreuses espèces, malgré les tentatives de régulation du commerce d'animaux sauvages menées au niveau international. La pollution et la disparition des habitats des reptiles sont les autres principaux dangers auxquels ils sont exposés.

Sommaire

Dénomination

« Reptile » signifie « qui rampe ». Ce terme, qui fait référence au serpent de la Genèse[1],[note 1], est issu du latin reptare qui signifie « ramper ». Il a fini par désigner un groupe d'animaux respirant à l'air, à écailles et ectothermes, bien que la reptation ne soit pas une caractéristique universelle pour ceux-ci.

« Reptilien » désigne ce qui est relatif aux reptiles, « reptilité » une attitude reptilienne. Ces deux termes ont une connotation négative, désignant ce qui est primitif et brutal. Toutefois, l'expression « animal reptilien », peut faire référence à tout animal qui rampe, y compris un insecte[1]. Dans la théorie obsolète du cerveau triunique popularisée dans les années 1970 par Paul D. MacLean, l'archipallium ou « cerveau reptilien » était considéré comme le siège des instincts, besoins primaires et des réflexes[2].

Systématique

 src=
Évolution des vertébrés selon un romérogramme axial représentant les cinq grandes classes (poissons[3], amphibiens, reptiles, oiseaux et mammifères). La largeur des axes indique le nombre de familles dans chaque classe (les téléostéens, poissons à squelette complètement osseux et à nageoires rayonnantes, représentent 99,8 % des espèces de poissons, et près de la moitié des espèces de vertébrés). En classification phylogénétique, seuls les oiseaux et les mammifères sont des groupes monophylétiques (les poissons, amphibiens et reptiles étant des groupes paraphylétiques)[4].

Histoire de la classification

Premières classifications

 src=
Pierre André Latreille, célèbre herpétologiste qui fut un des premiers à séparer les reptiles des batraciens.

Bien avant que l'on parle de classification, Aristote décrit près de 50 espèces qualifiées de reptiles (ερπετόν). Il définit plusieurs sous-groupes de reptiles : les lézards, les crocodiliens, les serpents et les batraciens. Il les distinguait des poissons, des oiseaux et des autres quadrupèdes. Selon sa méthode de classification, ces animaux vertébrés et à sang se distinguaient par leurs organes internes (poumon, épiploon, mésentère…) et par l'organisation de ceux-ci, leurs écailles, leur langue et la ponte d'œufs. La notion antique du reptile n'est plus la même, sans parler des batraciens, puisque certaines des espèces qualifiées de reptile aujourd'hui sont vivipares, ont des langues larges comme les geckos etc. Pline l'Ancien, l'autre grand auteur naturaliste de l'antiquité, reprend les conceptions d'Aristote et y ajoute bon nombre de faits fantaisistes[5],[6].

La confusion entre les espèces aujourd'hui appelées reptiles et les amphibiens perdure avec la première publication de Systema Naturae de Carl von Linné qui classe tous ces animaux dans le groupe des « Amphibia »[7]. Cette erreur peut se comprendre car la faune suédoise, sur laquelle le scientifique s'est appuyé, était peu pourvue en reptiles et parmi les rares animaux appartenant à cette classe qu'on pouvait y observer la vipère et la couleuvre étaient souvent aperçues chassant dans l'eau[8]. En revanche, Reptilia était souvent préféré par les Français[9]. L'habitude de traiter ces deux types d'animaux ensemble demeure aujourd'hui à travers le terme d'herpétologie, la science qui étudie l'ensemble de ces animaux.

Josephus Nicolaus Laurenti est le premier à utiliser officiellement le terme « Reptilia », pour désigner une classe d'animaux composée de reptiles et d'amphibiens similaire à celle de Linnaeus[10]. Il ne comprend toutefois pas dans ce groupe les tortues[11]. À la même époque, Cuvier définit les reptiles comme « tous les animaux vertébrés dépourvus de plumes, de poils et de mamelles, et respirant, au moins dans leur état adulte, l'air atmosphérique au moyen de poumons situés à l'intérieur de leur corps »[12]. Cette définition comprend donc bien les amphibiens.

Dans son ouvrage paru en 1799, Alexandre Brongniart s'appuie sur une étude des organes les plus essentiels des reptiles : ceux de la circulation, de la respiration ou de la reproduction, puis à des organes d'importance plus secondaire comme ceux de la digestion, de la locomotion ou du toucher[13]. Sa classification identifie quatre ordres de reptiles : les chéloniens (tortues), les sauriens comprenant les lézards et les crocodiliens, les ophidiens (serpents) et les batraciens. Il commence donc à isoler ces derniers en les différenciant des autres reptiles[14], mais ce ne sera pas avant le début du XIXe siècle qu'une différence marquée entre ces animaux devient effective dans les classifications, et cela n'empêchera pas le qualificatif d'« herpétologiste » de s'appliquer jusqu'à nos jours aux connaisseurs tant des amphibiens que des reptiles. Pierre André Latreille crée la classe des Batracia en 1825, répartissant les tétrapodes en 4 classes : reptiles, amphibiens, oiseaux et mammifères[15].

Sauropsides et thérapsides

 src=
L'anatomiste britannique Thomas Henry Huxley, ami de Charles Darwin, a travaillé sur la classification des espèces.

L'anatomiste britannique Thomas Henry Huxley a popularisé la définition de Latreille et, en parallèle avec Richard Owen, a élargi le terme Reptilia aux fossiles de monstres disparus comme les dinosaures et le Dicynodon (synapside, reptile mammalien). S'intéressant de près aux similarités entre reptiles et oiseaux, il voit même dans certains de ces animaux préhistoriques disparus les ancêtres directs des oiseaux modernes[16].

Ainsi, Huxley commence petit à petit à remettre en cause la séparation des tétrapodes entre reptiles, amphibiens, oiseaux et mammifères, qui n'est dès lors pas l'unique classification à être diffusée. Ainsi, dans les cours qu'il délivre au Royal College of Surgeons en 1863, il répartit les vertébrés en trois catégories : les mammifères, les sauropsidés (comprenant les oiseaux et les reptiles) et les ichthyopsidés (composés des poissons et des amphibiens)[17].

Les termes « Sauropsida » (littéralement « tête de lézard ») et « Therapsida » (« tête de bête ») ont été également utilisés en 1916 par Edwin Stephen Goodrich pour distinguer d'une part les lézards, les oiseaux et leurs ancêtres et d'autre part les mammifères et leurs ancêtres éteints. Goodrich justifiait cette division par la nature du cœur et des vaisseaux sanguins, et d'autres caractéristiques comme la structure du prosencéphale. Selon Goodrich, les deux lignées ont évolué à partir d'un groupe d'animaux aujourd'hui disparu qui comprenait des amphibiens du Paléozoïque et des reptiles primitifs et qu'il désignait sous le nom de « Protosauria »[18].

En 1956 David Meredith Seares Watson observe que les « Sauropsida » et les « Therapsida » ont divergé très rapidement au cours de l'évolution des reptiles. Il réinterprète ces deux groupes pour en exclure respectivement les oiseaux et les mammifères. Ainsi dans sa classification les sauropsidés comprennent les Procolophonia, les Eosuchia, les Millerosauria, les Chelonia (tortues), les Squamata (lézards et serpents), les Rhynchocephalia, les Crocodilia, les Thecodontia (groupe paraphylétique d'archosaures), les dinosaures non aviaires, les ptérosaures, les ichtyosaures, et les sauroptérygiens[19].

En 1866, Ernst Haeckel démontre que les vertébrés peuvent être classés suivant leur méthode de reproduction, et que les oiseaux, les reptiles et les mammifères partagent l'œuf amniotique. À la fin du XIXe siècle, la classe des Reptilia inclut donc tous les amniotes à l'exception des oiseaux et des mammifères[20]. Ainsi, ils comprennent les crocodiles, alligators, sphénodons, lézards, serpents, amphibiens, et tortues, ainsi que certains animaux disparus comme les dinosaures, synapsides et les Pareiasauridae primitifs. C'est encore la définition utilisée communément aujourd'hui.

Classification fondée sur le crâne

 src=
A : Anapside
B : Synapside
C : Diapside

Au XXe siècle, les reptiles sont divisés en quatre sous-classes en fonction du nombre et de l'emplacement des ouvertures temporales dans le crâne. Cette classification a été initiée par Henry Fairfield Osborn et popularisée par les travaux d'Alfred Sherwood Romer divulgués dans son célèbre Vertebrate Paleontology[21],[22]. Ces quatre classes sont :

La composition du groupe des euryapsides est un peu controversée. Les ichthyosaures sont parfois considérés comme ayant évolué indépendamment des autres euryapsides, ce qui lui a valu la dénomination de Parapsida. Mais on rejeta plus tard la légitimité de ce taxon (les ichthyosaures sont classés comme incertae sedis ou avec les Euryapsida). Les euryapsides semblent en fait dérivés des diapsides, chez lesquels une fosse temporale se serait bouchée, évolution vraisemblablement apparue à plusieurs reprises au cours de l'évolution des reptiles[23]. Toutefois, la classification en quatre sous-classes (ou trois si les Euryapsida sont placés parmi les Diapsida) demeure universellement reconnue par la plupart des scientifiques tout au long du XXe siècle[24] et a seulement été remise en cause par l'avènement de la phylogénétique.

Les tortues sont traditionnellement considérées comme des survivantes du groupe des anapsides, leur crâne ne présentant pas d'ouvertures particulières[25]. Cette classification est critiquée, certains scientifiques pensant que les tortues sont des diapsides qui sont revenus à la forme du crâne originelle pour améliorer leur protection, comme le suggère l'acception moderne du clade des Parareptilia[26]. Les études phylogénétiques plus récentes fondées sur la morphologie ont placé les tortues dans le taxon des Diapsida[27]. Toutes les études moléculaires confirment cette hypothèse et place fermement les tortues au sein du groupe des diapsides, les rapprochant généralement des archosaures[28],[29],[30],[31].

Phylogénie

 src=
En vert, le groupe des reptiles.

Au XXIe siècle, la majorité des paléontologues et des biologistes ont adopté la taxonomie cladiste, suivant laquelle chaque groupe doit former un clade, comprenant l'ensemble des descendants d'un ancêtre particulier. Les reptiles ne correspondent pas à cette définition, et sont clairement un groupe paraphylétique, puisqu'ils excluent les oiseaux et les mammifères, malgré le fait que ceux-ci soient également les descendants des premiers reptiles[32]. Colin Tudge écrit à ce propos :

« Les mammifères forment un clade, et c'est pourquoi les partisans de la nomenclature phylogénétique peuvent conserver ce taxon traditionnel. Il en est de même pour les oiseaux, universellement reconnus comme le taxon Aves. Mammalia et Aves sont en fait des sous-clades à l'intérieur du clade des amniotes. Mais la classe traditionnellement connue comme celle des reptiles ne constitue pas un clade. C'est simplement une section du clade des amniotes, la section qu'il reste quand on a retiré à ce clade les mammifères et les oiseaux. Ce groupe ne peut pas être défini par synapomorphie, au sens propre. On le définit par un certain nombre de caractères qu'ils possèdent ou dont ils manquent : les reptiles sont les amniotes qui n'ont pas de fourrure ni de plumes. Au mieux, on peut dire que les reptiles sont les amniotes non aviaires et non mammaliens[33]. »

Malgré les propositions pour remplacer le groupe paraphylétique Reptilia par le groupe holophylétique Sauropsida, ce dernier terme ne s'est pas réellement répandu, ou quand il l'est, est généralement mal employé[34]. Généralement on utilise le terme Sauropsida comme un synonyme de Reptilia. En 1988, Jacques Gauthier propose une définition du terme reptile respectant la cladistique, en en faisant un groupe holophylétique incluant les tortues, les lézards et les serpents, les crocodiliens et les oiseaux, ainsi que leurs ancêtres communs et leurs descendants[35]. Cette proposition est mise à mal par l'actuel débat sur l'emplacement réel des tortues dans la classification[34]. D'autres définitions ont été formulées par divers scientifiques à la suite de la publication de Gauthier. La première qui put postuler aux standards de PhyloCode a été publiée par Modesto et Anderson en 2004. Ils ont étudié les diverses définitions publiées précédemment et proposé leur propre définition qu'ils ont voulue la plus proche possible de la définition traditionnelle tout en étant stable et holophylétique. Ils ont ainsi défini le groupe des reptiles comme l'ensemble des amniotes plus proches de Lacerta agilis et Crocodylus niloticus que de Homo sapiens. Cette définition revient en fait à la définition de Sauropsida, que Modesto et Anderson ont tenté de rapprocher de Reptilia, cette dernière étant plus connue et plus fréquemment utilisée, bien que la définition inclut les oiseaux[34].

Taxinomie

 src=
Cladogramme des amniotes. En vert, brun et rouge, les reptiles préhistoriques ou actuels.

Classification

 src=
Un iguane vert (Iguana iguana) près de l'eau à Fort Lauderdale, Floride.

Ce taxon est considéré comme paraphylétique ; si les reptiles mammaliens fossiles forment un même clade avec les mammifères, les autres reptiles en forment un autre avec les oiseaux et les dinosaures, celui des Sauropsides, groupe frère du précédent au sein des vertébrés amniotes.

Voici la classification évolutionniste proposée par Benton en 2005[36],[note 2].

Le cladogramme ci-dessous représente en quelque sorte « l'arbre généalogique » des reptiles, dans la version simplifiée proposée par Laurin et Gauthier en 1996 dans le cadre du projet Tree of Life Web Project[37], avec les informations sur les reptiles les plus primitifs selon Muller et Reisz (2006)[38].

Les ordres de reptiles modernes

Testudines
 src=
Un testudiné, ici une Tortue tabatière.

Les tortues sont un groupe très ancien de reptiles, qui comprend aujourd'hui environ 340 espèces réparties dans 15 familles. Elles se caractérisent notamment par la carapace qui les protège des prédateurs. Celle-ci est composée d'un plastron sur la face ventrale et d'une dossière sur le dessus du corps, reliés sur les côtés par deux ponts osseux[39]. Elle est constituée de plaques osseuses et d'écailles reliées au squelette de l'animal[40]. Les tortues sont dépourvues de dents mais possèdent un bec corné leur permettant de trancher les aliments, carnés comme végétaux[41],[42]. Les tortues ont colonisé différents milieux, puisque l'on trouve parmi elles des tortues terrestres mais également des tortues aquatiques affectionnant l'eau douce et des tortues marines qui vivent la plupart du temps en pleine mer, et ne reviennent sur la terre ferme que pour pondre leurs œufs[43],[44]. Leur ordre est constitué de deux groupes principaux : les pleurodires, tortues de l'hémisphère sud qui ont notamment la particularité de rentrer leur tête en formant un S avec leur cou, et les cryptodires, qui rentrent leur tête sans changer son orientation, et qui regroupent la plupart des tortues terrestres et quelques amphibies, et toutes les espèces marines. Ces dernières ont connu un plus grand succès, plus nombreuses et remplaçant souvent les pleurodires[45].

Rhynchocéphales
 src=
Sphénodon ou Tuatara, appartenant à l'ordre des rhynchocéphales.

Ils ne sont plus représentés aujourd'hui que par deux espèces appartenant au genre Sphenodon. Cet ordre était florissant il y a 200 millions d'années[46]. Ces animaux possèdent un troisième œil et représentent un témoignage de la séparation des lignées ayant abouti aux lépidosauriens (dont les lézards, serpents et sphénodons font partie) d'une part et aux archosauriens (oiseaux et crocodiliens, entre autres) d'autre part.

Les deux espèces subsistant aujourd'hui sont endémiques de Nouvelle-Zélande. Elles constituent la branche divergeant le plus précocement dans l'arbre phylogénétique actuel des lépidosauriens. Le cerveau et le mode de locomotion présentent des états de caractères ancestraux d'amphibiens et l'organisation du cœur est plus simple que chez les autres reptiles[47].

Squamates
 src=
Un iguane vert, de l'ordre des squamates.

Le groupe des squamates est le groupe qui compte la plus grande diversité d'espèces avec environ 9 000 espèces. Ils regroupent des animaux qui ont la particularité de changer régulièrement de peau en muant par lambeau, voire en laissant l'intégralité de leur vieille peau derrière eux[42]. On les répartit en cinq sous-ordres :

  • Amphisbaenia (environ 190 espèces réparties en 6 familles) — les lézards-vers, sont caractérisés par leur absence de pattes. Ils ont un corps allongé avec une queue brève qui ressemble à la tête. Ils n'ont pas d'oreilles et les yeux sont profondément enfoncés, couverts avec de la peau et des écailles. Leur couleur rosée peut faire ressembler ces animaux à des vers de terre. Ils sont relativement mal connus du fait de leur mode de vie fouisseur[48].
  • Autarchoglossa — les lézards lacertidés, les varans, les orvets et les serpents de verre. Ce sont des animaux tétrapodes, dont les membres ont régressé chez les orvets et les serpents de verre. Ceux-ci se distinguent tout de même des serpents par la présence d'une oreille externe et de paupières[49].
  • Gekkota — les geckos, sont des animaux tétrapodes dont de nombreux représentants sont munis de setæ sous les pattes qui leur permettent de grimper sur toutes les surfaces, quelle que soit leur inclinaison et même sur les plus lisses[50].
  • Iguania — les iguanes et les caméléons, des reptiles tétrapodes semi-arboricoles, terrestres ou marins, qui se nourrissent principalement de végétaux et d'insectes[51].
  • Serpentes (environ 3 590 espèces réparties en 26 familles) — les serpents, des animaux apodes qui se déplacent sur le sol en rampant grâce aux contractions de leurs côtes. Un certain nombre d'entre eux sont équipés de crochets à venin qui rendent leur morsure très douloureuse et potentiellement mortelle[52].
Crocodiliens
 src=
Un crocodilien, le Crocodile américain.

Les crocodiliens forment un groupe de 30 espèces réparties en trois groupes, les Crocodylidae (crocodiles et faux-gavials), les Alligatoridae (alligators et caïmans) et les Gavialidae (gavials). Ces animaux sont bien adaptés à la vie aquatique. Ils ont un corps oblong fortement aplati, des pattes semi-palmées placées latéralement qui leur permettent de se déplacer en faisant traîner leur corps sur le sol, une longue queue garnie d'écailles et une large tête avec un long museau plat qui leur permet de rester immergés à l'exception de leur nez et leurs yeux[53].

Ces animaux sont les reptiles les plus proches des oiseaux. Ils ont une anatomie plus complexe que la plupart des autres espèces, notamment au niveau de la circulation sanguine avec leur cœur à quatre cavités. Ils font partie des seuls reptiles à développer des relations sociales évoluées avec la mise en place d'une hiérarchie dans le groupe, et à avoir un véritable comportement maternel[53].

Un groupe hétérogène aux limites floues

Les reptiles sont des animaux très divers chez lesquels on trouve peu de caractéristiques communes tant sur le point morphologique que physiologique. Ils partagent seulement les caractères de base comme la peau écailleuse, observés par les premiers scientifiques qui se sont intéressés à la classification des animaux sur quelques spécimens, et qui ont servi à définir le groupe autrefois. Par ailleurs, certains comme les crocodiliens sont plus proches des oiseaux, groupe de non-reptiles, que des autres ordres de reptiles. Les fossiles jadis considérés comme reptiles compliquent encore l'appréciation du groupe, puisque ceux-ci présentent une diversité encore bien plus importante que celle des reptiles actuels. Ils avaient colonisé tous les milieux, avec les dinosaures sur terre, les ichthyosaures et les mosasaures dans les mers et les ptérosaures dans les airs, et comprenaient pas moins de 16 ou 17 ordres[54], contre 4 actuellement. De plus, certains fossiles de dinosaures à plumes proches de l'origine des oiseaux (Archaeopteryx...), ou les reptiles mammaliens, à l'origine des mammifères, sont à la marge du regroupement, et compliquent sa définition[55].

Il est encore plus difficile de classer les fossiles entre amniotes et amphibiens. Il est habituel de considérer comme amphibiens tous les tétrapodes non-amniotes ce qui, strictement, est inexact. La distinction entre ces groupes est d'autant plus difficile que la séparation est plus ancienne. L'arbre phylogénique témoignant de cette séparation est le suivant :

Anatomie et morphologie

Le taxon des reptiles étant paraphylétique, il ne regroupe pas tous les animaux qui descendent d'un même ancêtre commun. Autrement dit, d'un point de vue strictement temporel, les oiseaux sont plus proches des crocodiliens que ces derniers ne le sont des lézards. On retrouve donc des caractéristiques communes aux oiseaux et aux crocodiliens qui sont absentes chez les tortues, les lézards et les serpents. En outre le dernier ancêtre commun à toutes ces espèces est très éloigné, par conséquent le terme reptile regroupe des animaux aux morphologies et caractéristiques anatomiques diverses, et qui n'ont que peu de caractéristiques en commun (d'où le rang taxonomique relativement élevé de classe). On observe par exemple de fortes variations de taille entre les représentants du groupe, dans lequel on retrouve les plus petits amniotes, des geckos du genre Sphaerodactylus, et des animaux comme le Crocodile marin qui peut atteindre une tonne. Les plus grands animaux que la Terre ait portés étaient également des reptiles, les dinosaures.

Aspect général

 src=
Écailles d'Elaphe climacophora.

Les reptiles sont des animaux vertébrés tétrapodes, bien que les membres aient régressé ou sont même complètement absents chez certains d'entre eux comme les serpents, les orvets et les amphisbènes. Leur corps est couvert d'écailles. Certains sont protégés par des plaques osseuses, formant même une carapace chez les tortues. Ils peuvent avoir divers attributs supplémentaires comme des crêtes, des fanons gulaires, des épines dorsales, des cornes… Leur corps se termine par une queue plus ou moins fusiforme. Les reptiles respirent tous à l'aide de poumons, plus ou moins complexes suivant les espèces.

 src=
Système circulatoire.

Ils ne disposent en revanche pas des caractéristiques propres aux mammifères comme les poils ou un diaphragme[56], remplacé chez les sauropsides par une couche de mésentère à la fonction identique. Ils ne disposent pas non plus de plumes, ce qui les distingue des oiseaux, mais comme eux leur respiration est assurée par les contractions de l'ensemble des muscles abdominaux et intercostaux[57]. Les reptiles ne disposent pas d'un cœur à quatre cavités identiques aux mammifères et aux oiseaux, mais d'un cœur à deux oreillettes et un ventricule, ce dernier étant partiellement cloisonné en deux chez les crocodiliens[58].

Différences anatomiques entre reptiles et amphibiens actuels

Si les différences entre les amphibiens avancés et les premiers reptiles au Carbonifère étaient très peu marquées, ils se distinguent aujourd'hui facilement par leurs caractéristiques morphologiques. Les reptiles et les amphibiens modernes diffèrent tout d'abord par leur peau. Celle-ci est souple et toujours humide chez les amphibiens, et facilite les échanges gazeux avec son environnement[59]. Chez les reptiles elle est sèche et écailleuse, et les échanges avec le milieu sont beaucoup plus rares. Au niveau de l'anatomie interne, le crâne des reptiles est relié au reste de la colonne vertébrale par un seul condyle occipital, contre deux chez les amphibiens, et le sacrum est composé d'au moins deux vertèbres, contre une seule chez les amphibiens[59]. Ces derniers ont un cœur composé d'un seul ventricule, quand il est au moins partiellement divisé chez les reptiles[59]. Enfin les amphibiens ont des canaux communs pour desservir leurs reins et leurs gonades, tandis qu'ils sont distincts chez les reptiles. Ces derniers sont par ailleurs capables de concentrer leur urine en réabsorbant de l'eau alors que les amphibiens ont une urine très diluée et leur système excréteur nécessite une grande quantité d'eau pour fonctionner[59],[60].

Écologie et comportement

 src=
Vue thermographique d'un serpent mangeant une souris, montrant très bien la différence entre animal homéotherme et animal poïkilotherme.

La majorité des reptiles est carnivore[61]. Ils se nourrissent de diverses proies, des plus petites comme les insectes, les petits crustacés, les mollusques ou les araignées, à de plus grosses comme des mammifères tels que les gnous ou les gazelles. Certains d'entre eux sont également herbivores, et ont développé des adaptations en lien avec ce régime, notamment au niveau du tractus digestif et de sa flore[62]. Du fait de leur métabolisme lent (mais accéléré par la chaleur[63]), et de leur assimilation lente des proies de grandes tailles, la plupart des reptiles sont capables de jeûner sur de longues périodes[53].

Les reptiles sont des animaux dits à sang froid, ou poïkilothermes, c'est-à-dire que leur température interne n'est pas stable mais dépendante de celle du milieu extérieur[64], mais là encore certains font exception, une étude de 2010 ayant montré que certains reptiles marins aujourd'hui disparus tels que le mosasaure, l'ichtyosaure et le plésiosaure parvenaient à maintenir une température plus élevée que celle de leur milieu grâce à la chaleur produite par leur métabolisme[65]. Lorsque les températures sont trop froides ou trop élevées, les reptiles entrent en léthargie et hibernent ou estivent suivant la situation[61].

On considère généralement que les reptiles sont moins intelligents que les mammifères ou les oiseaux[66]. La proportion de la taille de leur cerveau par rapport à leur corps est nettement moins élevée que celle des mammifères et la moelle épinière représente une forte proportion de l'ensemble du système nerveux. Leur quotient d'encéphalisation représente ainsi seulement un dixième de celui des mammifères[67]. Toutefois certains reptiles de grande taille présentent un système nerveux plus complexe. De grands lézards comme les varans sont connus pour présenter des comportements évolués et donc une certaine intelligence[68]. Les crocodiliens, au cerveau plus développé, sont en mesure de présenter un système hiérarchique de fonctionnement en groupe assez complexe[69].

Locomotion

 src=
Animation du cycle de marche d'un tétrapode du dévonien, avec une disposition transversale comme chez les reptiles.

Les reptiles ont conservé la disposition ancestrale des Tétrapodes, celle du membre transversal (membre qui se plie en Z chez les Amphibiens du Primaire, les Urodèles et Reptiles actuels) alors que les Mammifères et les Tétrapodes non mammaliens, secondairement bipèdes (certains Dinosauriens, Oiseaux), ont adopté le membre parasagittal qui assure une meilleure sustentation et locomotion[70].

« La disposition parasagittale est mécaniquement plus favorable que la disposition transversale, car cette dernière met en œuvre pour maintenir le stylopode en position horizontale des masses musculaires considérables qui ne sont pas disponibles pour l’effort locomoteur proprement dit. Au contraire, le membre parasagittal réalise une structure apte à supporter d’emblée le poids du corps dans de bonnes conditions mécaniques : tout l’effort musculaire peut être utilisé pour mobiliser les leviers osseux les uns par rapport aux autres dans un plan parasagittal optimal pour la progression. Le « prix à payer » pour cette amélioration est une plus grande complexité du contrôle nerveux de l’attitude. En effet, chez les formes à membres transversaux, le polygone de sustentation est large et l’équilibre stable. Il est étroit au contraire chez les formes à membres parasagittaux, l’équilibre est moins stable et le contrôle de l’attitude exige une bonne coordination neuromotrice[71] ».

Reproduction

 src=
Accouplement d'Hemidactylus frenatus (Geckos d'Asie), vue ventrale avec hémipénis inséré dans la fente cloacale.

Les reptiles sont des amniotes. Ils sont majoritairement ovipares mais certains sont vivipares. Chez les espèces ovipares, le sexe est souvent déterminé par des conditions environnementales, et notamment par la température.

Le « taux de survie » des juvéniles est un des paramètres critiques de démographie et survie d'une espèce. Les jeunes reptiles, très discrets sont rarement observés et ne sont pas trouvés lors des programmes de suivi par marquage-recapture. On en a déduit que les taux de survie des juvéniles sont très faibles. Cette hypothèse est contredite par des travaux récents de modélisation. Ceux-ci ont indirectement estimé les taux de survie des juvéniles nécessaires au maintien d'une population stable, d'après les données publiées sur la démographie des reptiles et les taux de survie des adultes dans 109 populations de reptiles (englobant 57 espèces). Les taux estimés de survie des juvéniles seraient en fait bien plus élevés que ce que l'on pensait (en moyenne, seulement environ 13 % moindres que ceux des adultes de la même espèce) et fortement corrélée au taux de survie des adultes. Selon ces mêmes travaux, les taux de survie au cours de la vie (des juvénile et des adultes) devraient être plus élevés chez les tortues que chez les serpents, et plus chez les serpents que les lézards. Conformément aux théories de l'évolution, les taux de survie des juvéniles seraient plus élevés au sein des squamates vivipares que chez les ovipares (mais le nombre total de jeunes est moindre). La croyance répandue que les reptiles juvéniles ont un faible taux de survie annuel résulterait donc de difficultés d'échantillonnage. Il reste à expliquer comment les jeunes reptiles échappent autant aux observateurs naturalistes[72].

Distribution et habitat

 src=
Nombre d'espèces de reptiles par continent.

Les reptiles sont présents sur quasiment l'intégralité de la surface du globe, à l'exception des zones trop froides à proximité des pôles. Comme ce sont des animaux à sang froid, ils préfèrent tout de même les températures assez élevées, et leur présence et leur diversité deviennent plus importante à proximité des tropiques[73]. Ainsi, les continents les plus riches en reptiles sont l'Asie, l'Afrique et l'Amérique du Sud.

 src=
Les reptiles se sont adaptés à de très nombreux milieux, y compris aux océans.

Les reptiles peuvent s'adapter à des habitats très différents. On les trouve très présents dans les forêts tropicales, avec une très forte diversité d'espèces, mais ils peuplent également les déserts, où l'on retrouve des lézards et des serpents qui s'abritent durant la journée et sortent la nuit. Dans les zones montagneuses les lézards aiment se cacher dans des amas de pierres, et certains serpents se sont spécialisés dans les zones d'altitude comme la Vipère d'Orsini (Vipera ursinii) que l'on trouve dans les hautes montagnes d'Europe à des altitudes avoisinant 2 000 m[74]. Certains reptiles sont dits fouisseurs et passent une partie de leur vie sous la terre comme les amphisbènes. Les reptiles ont également colonisé les milieux aquatiques : les crocodiliens, certaines tortues comme la Cistude d'Europe et certains serpents comme l'anaconda, le Mocassin d'eau et les couleuvres sont à leur aise dans les rivières et lacs d'eau douce, quand les tortues marines sont présentes dans tous les océans du monde, et ne rejoignent la terre ferme que pour se reproduire[73]. Les serpents marins représentent un niveau d'adaptation supérieur, puisqu'ils ne retournent plus du tout à terre pour la plupart d'entre eux, et ont adopté un cycle de vie exclusivement marin. De nombreuses espèces ont des mœurs arboricoles, comme les serpents ou les lézards. Certains peuvent se déplacer d'arbres en arbres en « planant » comme les dragons volants et dans une moindre mesure certains serpents comme les couleuvres volantes.

Histoire évolutive

Origine des reptiles

 src=
Un des premiers reptiles : Hylonomus lyelli, hypothétiquement reconstitué par Nobu Tamura.

Les reptiles sont apparus il y a environ 320 ou 310 Ma dans les marais de la fin du Carbonifère, et sont issus de l'évolution d'animaux reptiliomorphes avancés[26]. Ceux des reptiliomorphes qui sont devenus amniotes se distinguent des amphibiens par leur œuf, dont la coquille solide leur permet d'être pondu à même le sol. Ceci permet aux reptiles de coloniser le milieu terrestre en y passant l'intégralité de leur temps, tandis que les amphibiens restent plus ou moins inféodés au milieu aquatique[59]. Ce type d'œuf, appelé œuf amniotique, est l'apanage des amniotes, un taxon d'animaux dont les premiers représentants peuvent être qualifiés de reptiles. Le plus ancien amniote connu est Casineria, considéré comme un reptile primitif plutôt que comme un amphibien avancé[75],[76]. Une série d'empreintes fossiles retrouvées en Nouvelle-Écosse, datant d'il y a 315 Ma, présente les orteils et les empreintes d'écailles caractéristiques des reptiles[77]. Ces empreintes sont attribuées à Hylonomus, le premier amniote incontestable connu[78]. Il s'agissait d'un petit animal à l'allure de lézard, d'environ 20 à 30 cm de long, avec de nombreuses dents pointues attestant de son régime insectivore[79]. Parmi les plus anciens reptiles connus on répertorie également Westlothiana, qui est toutefois pour le moment plutôt considéré comme un amphibien reptiliomorphe que comme un véritable amniote[80] et Paleothyris, qui ont une allure et des comportements similaires à Hylonomus.

Radiation des reptiles

 src=
Megalania, un varan carnivore qui pouvait atteindre 7 mètres de long et peser jusqu'à 1,94 t (Molnar, 2004).

Les premiers reptiles étaient anapsides, présentant un crâne plein avec seulement des ouvertures pour les yeux, le nez, la colonne vertébrale[66]. Très rapidement après l'apparition des premiers reptiles, ceux-ci se scindent en deux branches[81],[82]. Une de ces branches, les Synapsida (incluant les reptiles mammaliens ainsi que les mammifères actuels et éteints), a une ouverture dans le crâne, juste derrière l'œil ; l'autre branche, celle des Diapsida, présente, en plus du trou situé derrière chaque œil, un second trou plus haut dans le crâne. Ces trous laissent dans le crâne de la place pour les muscles de la mâchoire, permettant une morsure plus puissante[66].

Les premiers reptiles restent d'abord de taille modeste, car certains amphibiens comme Cochleosaurus les surpassent en taille, et ces reptiles ne représentent qu'une très faible part de la faune avant le changement climatique qui marque la seconde partie du Carbonifère. Au Carbonifère supérieur, le climat devient plus aride à partir de la fin du Moscovien, il y a environ 305 millions d'années[83],[84]. Ce changement assez brusque de climat affecte plusieurs grands groupes d'animaux, notamment les amphibiens, alors que les reptiles survivent un peu mieux, certainement mieux adaptés aux conditions sèches qui s'ensuivent. Les amphibiens doivent retourner pondre leurs œufs dans l'eau, à la différence des reptiles aux œufs munis d'une coquille qui peuvent vivre loin des points d'eau. Les reptiles colonisent dès lors de nouvelles niches écologiques à une vitesse supérieure que précédemment, et surtout plus vite que les amphibiens. Ils développent de nouvelles stratégies alimentaires, certains d'entre eux devenant herbivores, d'autres devenant carnivores, alors qu'ils étaient tous au départ uniquement insectivores et piscivores[83]. À partir de cette période, les reptiles dominent la vie terrestre et présentent une diversité bien supérieure à celle des amphibiens, préparant le Mésozoïque que l'on considérait jadis comme l'« ère des reptiles »[85].

Les reptiles du Permien

À la fin du Carbonifère, les reptiles sont la faune tétrapode dominante. Tandis que les amphibiens reptiliomorphes existent toujours, les synapsides forment la première mégafaune terrestre à travers pélycosaures comme Edaphosaurus et le carnivore Dimetrodon. Au milieu du Permien, le climat devient plus sec, ce qui provoque un changement de la faune : les pélycosaures sont remplacés par les thérapsides, mieux adaptés[86]. Au Permien, ces animaux dominent largement la faune terrestre et on considère que 6 reptiles sur 7 sont des thérapsides[87].

Les anapsides, dont le crâne massif ne présente aucune ouverture postorbitale, sont toujours très présents tout au long du Permien. Les paréïasaures atteignent notamment de très grandes proportions dans la seconde partie du Permien, avant de disparaître à la fin de cette période (les tortues pourraient en être des survivants)[86].

Très tôt au cours de cette période, les diapsides se séparent en deux grandes lignées, les archosaures (groupe des crocodiliens, des dinosaures et donc des oiseaux) et les lépidosauriens (qui donneront plus tard les serpents, lézards et sphénodons que l'on connaît aujourd'hui). Ces deux groupes gardent une petite taille et une allure de lézard durant le Permien.

Le Mésozoïque, anciennement appelé « ère des reptiles »

 src=
Représentation par Gerhard Boeggemann d'une scène du mésozoïque montrant la faune de l'époque : les dinosaures Europasaurus holgeri et Iguanodon, et un dinosaure-oiseau, Archaeopteryx, perché sur un arbre.

Le terme d'« ère des reptiles » a été abandonné car le groupe des mammifères, qui a connu une explosion radiative après l'extinction des grands archosaures, est apparu en même temps que ceux-ci et, si les mammifères du Mésozoïque étaient de taille inférieure à celle des archosaures, ils étaient en revanche très nombreux. Par ailleurs, si les dinosaures ont produit des espèces de grande taille, la plupart d'entre eux étaient de taille moyenne (comme Ornithomimus ou Variraptor) ou petite (comme Compsognathus), à l'image des mammifères ou des oiseaux actuels. Ainsi, notre image du Mésozoïque s'est trouvée profondément modifiée par les découvertes récentes[88].

La fin du Permien marque une des plus grandes périodes d'extinction, un phénomène qui se prolonge à cause de deux fortes extinctions d'espèces[89]. La plupart des grands anapsides et synapsides disparaissent, remplacés par les archosauromorphes. Les archosaures prennent alors diverses formes, et plusieurs se caractérisent par des pattes postérieures allongées et une posture plus ou moins dressée qui faisait ressembler les plus anciennes espèces à des crocodiliens à longues pattes. Les archosauriens deviennent le groupe de reptiles dominant du Trias, mais il faut tout de même 30 Ma pour que leur diversité soit aussi importante que durant le Permien[89]. Petit à petit la bipédie devient courante chez ces animaux, même les plus petits[90], ce qui leur confère une plus grande vitesse. Toutefois d'autres groupes d'archosaures adoptent une démarche à quatre pattes avec des pattes assez courtes, comme les phytosaures puis les crocodiliens.

Les dinosaures sont des archosaures. À la suite de l'extinction de diverses espèces d'archosaures vers la fin du Trias, ils investissent rapidement les niches écologiques laissées vacantes et prennent de l'importance. Ils se divisent rapidement en deux grands ordres, les Ornithischia et les Saurischia. On retrouve chez eux la bipédie de leurs ancêtres, même si certains retourneront par la suite à une posture quadrupède[91]. Au cours du Mésozoïque, le groupe des dinosaures va connaître une importante radiation et former divers ordres et sous-ordres très différents les uns des autres, tant pas leur aspect que par leurs mœurs[92]. Certains sont ainsi devenus les plus grands animaux terrestres ayant existé. Le Mésozoïque est donc parfois appelé l'« ère des dinosaures », animaux dont certains ont développé l'endothermie, comme le prouve la vascularisation de leurs os et divers autres indices, de la même manière qu'elle est apparue chez les reptiles mammaliens, mais la question de savoir si tous les dinosaures étaient endothermes reste fortement débattue dans le milieu scientifique[93]. Les dinosaures ont également pris de nombreuses formes plus petites, comme celle des petits théropodes à plumes qui, au milieu du Jurassique, vont donner naissance aux premiers oiseaux, et c'est surtout parmi ces formes que l'endothermie est probable[86].

Les diapsides lepidosauromorphes pourrait être à l'origine des reptiles marins[94]. Ces reptiles forment le groupe des sauroptérygiens au début du Trias et celui des ichtyosaures au milieu du Trias. Les mosasaures apparaissent également durant le Mésozoïque, au milieu du Crétacé il y a environ 100 Ma.

La disparition des dinosaures

L'extinction Crétacé-Tertiaire à la fin du Crétacé voit la disparition de tous les groupes de dinosaures du Mésozoïque à l'exception des oiseaux. Parmi les grands reptiles marins, seules les tortues marines survivent, et parmi les dinosaures, seule une famille de petits théropodes, celle des oiseaux. C'est là que l'ancienne imagerie descriptive de la paléontologie plaçait la fin de l'« ère des reptiles » et le début de l'« ère des mammifères »[85]. En fait, il n'en est rien, si l'on considère que les oiseaux, qui sont des dinosaures, colonisent les premiers, avant les mammifères, les niches écologiques laissées vides par les dinosaures non-aviens, et que les mammifères, apparus en même temps que les dinosaures, étaient également bien représentés au Mésozoïque (eux aussi ont payé un lourd tribut à l'extinction) ; tout au plus peut-on parler d'une « ère des gros dinosaures » suivie par une « ère des gros mammifères » (avec une période des « gros oiseaux » entre les deux, au Paléocène et à l'Éocène)[88].

La diversification des reptiles continue tout au long du Cénozoïque, les squamates prenant une plus grande importance que lors du Mésozoïque. Aujourd'hui ceux-ci constituent la majorité des reptiles existants (plus de 90 %)[95]. On compte actuellement 8 700 espèces de reptiles[95], contre 5 400 espèces de mammifères et près d'une dizaine de milliers d'oiseaux.

Les reptiles et l'homme

Les reptiles dans la culture

La symbolique des reptiles est particulièrement complexe, ces animaux ayant parfois mauvaise réputation, représentant le mal en personne comme le serpent, mais inspirant le respect, et pouvant même être sacralisés comme certains crocodiliens en Afrique.

Symbolique des reptiles dans les mythes, croyances et religions

 src=
Sobek, dieu égyptien de l'eau à tête de crocodile.

On retrouve les reptiles dans de nombreux cultes très anciens. Ainsi, les aborigènes d'Australie vénéraient le serpent arc-en-ciel comme l'un de leurs plus puissants êtres ancestraux, protecteur de son peuple[96]. Dans les civilisations d'Amérique du Sud, les Aztèques et les Toltèques vénéraient Quetzalcoatl, littéralement le « serpent à plumes », un dieu bienfaisant très respecté[97]. Chez les Romains et les Grecs, le dieu de la médecine, qu'ils appelaient respectivement Esculape et Asclépios, avait un serpent autour de son bâton, un symbole repris par la suite dans les professions médicales sous la forme du caducée[98]. Les Égyptiens vouaient eux un culte aux crocodiles sacrés du Nil, dont certains étaient même momifiés après leur mort[99]. Ce culte demeure en Afrique encore aujourd'hui, certains villages du Burkina Faso ont leur mare aux crocodiles sacrés. Le dieu de l'eau dans la mythologie égyptienne était d'ailleurs Sobek, un dieu à tête de crocodile[100]. Cette mythologie comprend également un grand nombre de dieux pouvant prendre la forme d'un serpent, souvent d'un cobra. De nombreuses cultures reprennent l'image de l'ouroboros, un serpent se mordant la queue et représentant l'infini, le cycle éternel de la nature. Il fut d'ailleurs repris par les mathématiciens à travers la lemniscate, un huit couché symbolisant l'infini. La mauvaise réputation des reptiles est plus récente. Dans la Bible par exemple, le serpent est l'animal du péché originel, qui trompa Ève et provoqua l'exclusion d'Adam et Ève du jardin d'Eden. La punition du serpent fut de devoir ramper[101]. Sa forme phallique lui a aussi valu la symbolique de la luxure et du péché.

Reptiles imaginaires

Même si l'on ne peut pas réellement parler de reptiles, de nombreux animaux issus de l'imagination humaine partagent un grand nombre de traits communs avec ces animaux. L'exemple le plus connu est le dragon, gigantesque reptile écailleux généralement pourvu d'ailes et que l'on retrouve dans les mythologies du monde entier. Le dragon n'a pas la même signification suivant la civilisation. Il est un symbole de vie et de puissance en Chine, un protecteur en Indonésie, un gardien de trésors en Grèce antique ou encore un être maléfique et ravisseur de princesses en Europe médiévale.

Les gigantesques reptiles marins contemporains des dinosaures comme les plésiosaures ont également inspiré les hommes. On retrouve de telles créatures dans la mythologie maritime à travers les serpents de mer, mais aussi dans d'autres légendes comme celle du monstre du Loch Ness, une sorte de plésiosaure qui vivrait dans le lac du même nom en Écosse[102].

Reptiles dans l'art

En peinture, les reptiles sont surtout représentés à travers la mythologie ou la religion dans laquelle ils prennent une place importante. Ainsi, des scènes comme le serpent incitant Ève à manger le fruit défendu ou Saint Georges tuant le dragon ont été représentées par de très nombreux artistes. Les dragons, reptiles imaginaires, ont également inspiré de très nombreux sculpteurs.

On retrouve également les reptiles dans le cinéma, notamment à travers des films d'horreur comme L'Incroyable Alligator, Black Water, La femme reptile, Reptiles ou Anaconda, le prédateur[103],[104]. Ils ont également inspiré le titre du film Le reptile, même si ces animaux n'ont pas grand-chose à voir avec l'intrigue du film. Ce sont aussi les héros des différents films, dessins animés et bandes dessinées de la série des tortues ninja. Les reptiles qui ont le plus grand succès dans ce domaine sont sans conteste les dinosaures, reptiles disparus qui occupent une place majeure dans divers œuvres comme le roman de Conan Doyle de 1912 Le Monde Perdu dont de nombreux films ont repris la trame[105], celui de Michael Crichton des années 1990 Jurassic Park ainsi que la célèbre série de films de Steven Spielberg qui s'en est inspirée, ou encore les films majeurs King Kong et Godzilla et ceux qui en ont découlé[106]. Pour les plus jeunes, les dinosaures sont les personnages principaux de diverses séries animées comme Denver, le dernier dinosaure ou Le petit dinosaure. Les reptiles humanoïdes sont également des personnages récurrents de la science-fiction, et apparaissent à la télévision comme dans la série V et son remake V (2009), au cinéma ou dans divers jeux vidéo.

Les reptiles dans l'économie

Élevage des reptiles

 src=
Élevage de crocodiliens au Cambodge vu par un drone.

L'élevage des reptiles, qui reste marginal par rapport aux autres types d'élevage, se développe dans différents points du globe. Ainsi, l'élevage de l'alligator, principalement pour sa peau mais aussi pour sa viande, est en expansion en Floride, au Texas et en Louisiane. La production de ces trois états s'élève à 45 000 peaux par an. Une peau d'alligator, utilisée par la maroquinerie de luxe se négocie à environ 300 $ pièce en 2010[107]. En Asie, ce sont les crocodiliens qui sont de plus en plus présents dans les fermes. Certains devenaient tellement rares à l'état sauvage qu'ils ne pouvaient plus faire l'objet d'une exploitation commerciale. L'apparition des élevages dans les années 1960, quand on a réussi à faire reproduire cet animal en captivité, a permis de redonner espoir quant à la sauvegarde de certaines espèces dans la nature[108]. L'élevage peut produire des crocodiliens destinés à être abattus pour leur viande, qui sont consommés dans divers pays d'Asie comme la Chine, mais le débouché le plus recherché est la maroquinerie. Comme les peaux doivent être en parfait état pour s'introduire sur ce marché, les animaux sont souvent placés dans des cages individuelles pour ne pas qu'ils se battent entre eux et se blessent.

En Afrique aussi l'élevage de reptiles est en pleine expansion, exportant des animaux en Europe et aux États-Unis pour devenir animaux de compagnie ou alimenter l'industrie de la peau de reptiles. De petits élevages visent également à approvisionner le marché local de la viande de reptile, certains consommateurs des villes étant par exemple demandeurs de viande de python[109].

En France, l'article 8 de l'arrêté du 8 octobre 2018 du ministère de la Transition écologique et solidaire contraint tout détenteur d'animaux d'espèces non domestiques à tenir un registre d'entrée et de sortie de ces animaux[110].

Reptiles dans l'alimentation humaine

 src=
Soupe de tortue à Singapour.

Dans de nombreux pays la consommation de reptiles est une pratique courante pour assurer la subsistance des populations locales. C'est notamment le cas dans divers pays d'Afrique, d'Asie ou d'Amérique où la pratique est ancrée. Toutefois, la consommation de viande de reptiles prend de plus en plus d'importance. C'est le cas notamment en Asie où elle est bien implantée et représente même une activité économique non négligeable, comme en Chine par exemple[111]. La consommation de serpent y daterait de plus de 2 000 ans et environ 7 000 à 9 000 tonnes de serpents sont commercialisées chaque année dans ce pays[112]. La consommation de reptiles est en augmentation, et les Chinois sont importateurs de divers animaux comme les serpents et les crocodiliens venus d'Asie du Sud-Est. Une étude menée entre 1993 et 1996 a évalué qu'entre 2 et 30 tonnes d'animaux sauvages transitaient quotidiennement de manière illégale à travers la frontière sino-vietnamienne, à destination des marchés et restaurants des villes frontalières de la région autonome du Guangxi[113].

La chair de tortue est considérée comme un mets délicat dans de nombreuses cultures[114]. La soupe de tortue a longtemps été un plat noble dans la gastronomie anglo-américaine et l'est toujours dans certaines régions d'Extrême-Orient. Les plats à base de gophère étaient également populaires dans certaines populations de Floride[115]. La tortue est également un aliment traditionnel de l'île de Grand Cayman où des élevages de tortues marines pour la consommation se sont développés.

La consommation de viande de crocodile et d'alligator se développe beaucoup en marge de l'élevage de ses animaux pour leur peau. La viande de crocodilien est une viande claire proche de la viande de volaille, qui est peu grasse et assez bien pourvue en protéines[116]. Son marché se développe aux États-Unis mais aussi en Europe, et est également très important en Chine et en Asie du Sud-Est.

La maroquinerie de luxe

 src=
Portefeuille en peau de crocodilien.

La peau de reptiles est particulièrement recherchée par la maroquinerie de luxe. Une fois la peau retirée de l'animal, elle est tannée, puis elle est utilisée pour fabriquer des sacs à main, des bracelets de montre, des porte-monnaie, des chaussures ou des ceintures. L'origine de ces peaux n'est pas toujours claire, une partie provenant d'élevage légal mais une autre provenant du braconnage. Ce marché est particulièrement lucratif, et génère de très fortes valeurs ajoutées qui encouragent le trafic illégal[117].

Il n'est pas très facile d'évaluer l'ampleur du commerce international de peau de reptiles, qui représente certainement des millions d'euros, à cause du très vaste marché illégal. Rien que pour sa partie légale, on estime que 10 à 15 millions de peaux de reptiles sont commercialisées dans le monde chaque année[117]. Certaines espèces sont particulièrement concernées. Ainsi, en 2004, on estime que 629 000 pythons réticulés, 400 000 lézards tégus et 1 540 000 alligators ont alimenté le commerce international de peaux de reptile[118]. Les crocodiliens et les petits varans comme le varan malais paient aussi un lourd tribut.

Toutes ces peaux sont généralement importées par les pays développés d'Amérique du Nord et d'Europe. Entre les années 2000 et 2005, près de 3,4 millions de peaux de lézard, 2,9 millions de peaux de crocodilien et 3,4 millions de peaux de serpent sont entrées légalement ou illégalement aux États-Unis[119]. En Europe, c'est également près de deux millions de peaux de reptile qui sont vendues chaque année au début des années 2000[120].

Utilisation dans la médecine traditionnelle et la cosmétique

 src=
Le venin de serpent peut avoir diverses applications dans la médecine moderne et traditionnelle.

Les venins des serpents contiennent de très nombreuses molécules dont certaines peuvent être utilisées en médecine. Ils font l'objet de diverses recherches afin de découvrir de nouveaux principes actifs, et ont permis d'isoler des médicaments utilisés contre les angines de poitrine, des régulateurs de pression artérielle et des analgésiques. La toxine botulique du venin de cobra entre dans la composition du botox[121]. Le venin de serpent est largement utilisé en médecine traditionnelle, notamment dans les pays asiatiques et africains[109].

La tortue est également utilisée en médecine traditionnelle. C'est notamment le cas de l'émyde mutique au Cambodge, aujourd'hui quasiment disparue, qui était utilisée pour les soins post-nataux[122]. La carapace de la tortue d'Hermann est utilisée dans la médecine traditionnelle en Serbie[123]. La médecine chinoise traditionnelle utilise beaucoup les plastrons de tortues dans différentes préparations. L'une des plus connues est la gelée de tortue, la guilinggao. La seule île de Taïwan importe des centaines de tonnes de plastrons tous les ans[124].

Reptiles animaux de compagnie

 src=
Les pythons font partie des reptiles appréciés comme animaux de compagnie, et les variantes de coloris comme ici un albinos sont recherchées.

Les reptiles peuplent de plus en plus les terrariums de particuliers en tant qu'animaux de compagnie. Parmi les reptiles les plus fréquemment rencontrés en terrariophilie, on trouve les serpents non venimeux comme les pythons et les boas, les geckos, les iguanes, les tortues terrestres ou d'eau douce ou des caméléons, qui attirent les amateurs notamment par leurs changements de couleur[125]. On compte pas moins de 13 millions de reptiles dans 4,6 millions de foyers aux États-Unis en 2011[126] et ils sont particulièrement populaires au Royaume-Uni avec neuf millions d'animaux, soit plus que le nombre de chiens du pays[127]. En France on compte environ un million de reptiles parmi les animaux de compagnie en 2004[128]. Le marché des reptiles comme nouveaux animaux de compagnie (NAC) est en pleine expansion et se révèle très lucratif, tant pour le marché légal que pour le marché illégal qui s'approvisionne directement dans la nature sans autorisation[129].

L'élevage de reptiles comme animaux de compagnie pose également parfois des problèmes de marronnage, s'ils sont relâchés dans la nature. C'est le cas avec la tortue de Floride qui a été importée massivement en Europe par les animaleries à la fin du XXe siècle et relâchée en grand nombre dans la nature, par des propriétaires incapables de s'occuper de leur petite tortue devenue grande. Elle a réussi à s'acclimater et est devenue invasive en France où elle prend peu à peu la place de la tortue indigène, la Cistude[130].

Divertissements

 src=
Steve Irwin nourrissant un crocodile dans un zoo en Australie.

Les reptiles sont bien représentés dans les zoos à travers le monde entier, souvent dans des vivariums abritant des reptiles, plus ou moins importants. Certains parcs sont même spécialisés dans les reptiles, comme en France l'île aux Serpents dans la Vienne ou La Ferme aux crocodiles dans la Drôme qui disposent d'enclos[131]. C'est aussi le cas de l'Alice Springs Reptile Centre qui accueille des reptiles endémiques d'Australie, du St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park en Floride qui est le seul parc où toutes les espèces de crocodiliens sont représentées, ou de Reptile Gardens, à côté de Rapid City dans le Dakota du Sud qui héberge la plus vaste collection de reptiles au monde. Des démonstrations sont parfois organisées autour de ces animaux, mettant par exemple en scène des dresseurs de crocodiliens qui manipulent ces animaux réputés féroces[132]. En Australie, des croisières sont organisées pour observer les Crocodiles marins avec pour principale attraction les sauts de ces animaux pour attraper des morceaux de viande tendus au bout de cannes[133].

En Afrique du Nord et en Asie du Sud (Inde, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, etc.), des charmeurs de serpents impressionnent les passants en paraissant envoûter des serpents ondulant au rythme de la musique qu'ils jouent[134]. En Martinique, des combats entre un serpent et une mangouste sont organisés à l'image des combats de coqs, mais ne font pas l'objet de paris[135].

Menaces que représentent les reptiles pour l'homme

Danger des reptiles pour l'homme

 src=
Serpent très répandu en Inde, le Cobra indien (Naja naja) fait partie des serpents qui causent le plus de morsures.

Les reptiles qui font le plus de victimes parmi les populations humaines sont sans conteste les serpents. En effet, le venin de certains est mortel si la blessure n'est pas soignée à temps. Il est très difficile de recenser le nombre d'attaques par des serpents et le nombre de morts. Elles demeurent relativement peu élevées dans les pays de l'hémisphère nord, mais sont très fréquentes en Asie, en Afrique et en Amérique du Sud. On estime le nombre de morsures annuelles à plus de cinq millions dont la moitié par des serpents venimeux, et le nombre de morts à environ 125 000 par an, dont pas moins de 100 000 en Asie[136]. Parmi les serpents venimeux dangereux, on note notamment les cobras et d'autres élapidés comme les mambas et les taipans, les crotales, les vipéridés.

Les crocodiliens ont une réputation de mangeurs d'homme et peuvent en effet présenter un véritable danger. Ils deviennent particulièrement dangereux pendant la période de reproduction, durant laquelle ils protègent leur territoire contre tout intrus. Ils attaquent parfois des pirogues traversant leur territoire sans forcément s'en prendre aux passagers. Des cas plus sérieux de personnes se baignant ou lavant du linge dans les rivières et emportés par un crocodile se produisent aussi régulièrement[53] Aux États-Unis environ 200 attaques d'alligators ont été relevées depuis 1948, dont 14 mortelles[137]. En Australie, on comptabilise en moyenne une attaque mortelle de crocodile marin par an, généralement dans le nord du pays[138]. Mais, c'est clairement en Afrique que les crocodiles font le plus de victimes. Il est toutefois difficile d'avoir des données claires car les décès ne sont pas forcément tous recensés, et on ne peut pas toujours savoir si une disparition a été causée ou non par une attaque de crocodile. On estime cependant le nombre de morts consécutives à des attaques de Crocodile du Nil à plusieurs centaines par an en Afrique sub-saharienne[139].

Peur des reptiles

Depuis toujours les reptiles inquiètent les hommes. La peur des reptiles est une des peurs les plus courantes, et peut provoquer une panique presque incontrôlable chez certaines personnes. On l'appelle herpétophobie, et la peur des serpents, qui est particulièrement répandue, est appelée ophiophobie. Ces réactions peuvent tout d'abord s'expliquer par le danger que ceux-ci représentent ; une morsure de serpent, si elle n'est pas systématiquement mortelle, nécessite souvent des soins importants. Par ailleurs, il pourrait y avoir une part d'instinctif dans la peur des reptiles, et notamment celle des serpents, puisque chez de nombreux mammifères cette réaction semble innée, ou du moins les animaux possèdent de très fortes prédispositions pour développer cette peur[140],[141].

Protection des reptiles

Menaces autour des reptiles

 src=
Tortue prise dans un filet.

Dans certains pays, les reptiles sont victimes du braconnage. Les animaux ainsi chassés sont utilisés pour l'alimentation, la médecine traditionnelle et pour leur peau, qui une fois tannée peut être utilisée dans l'industrie du luxe pour confectionner des bracelets de montre, des sacs à main ou des portefeuilles, vendus en Europe et en Amérique du Nord[142]. Le marché des NAC s'approvisionne lui aussi largement auprès de braconniers qui prélève des animaux à l'état sauvage, le marché des NAC est une menace importante pour les espèces rares de reptiles qui voient leurs effectifs chuter dans leur milieu d'origine pour approvisionner les terrariums, avec souvent des pertes importantes durant le voyage[129]. Malgré l'émergence d'élevages, ceux-ci ne parviennent pas pour le moment à enrayer le commerce illégal, et sont eux-mêmes demandeurs d'animaux capturés dans la nature, afin de constituer leurs animaux reproducteurs[109]. Les reptiles sont parfois tués simplement du fait de leur mauvaise réputation. Ainsi les serpents sont régulièrement détruits, même les espèces inoffensives, car on redoute qu'ils soient dangereux pour l'homme. Les attaques de crocodiles sont généralement suivies d'expéditions punitives qui font de nombreuses victimes parmi eux.

Parmi les menaces qui planent sur les reptiles on compte notamment la disparition de leur habitat. En effet, l'urbanisation croissante, la pollution des eaux, la déforestation qui touche certaines grandes forêts du globe, comme en Asie tropicale, réduisent fortement les aires où les reptiles vivent. Les routes constituent également un danger important pour des animaux comme les tortues qui sont fréquemment écrasées par des voitures. Les tortues marines, qui sont particulièrement menacées, sont parfois victimes de prises accidentelles dans les filets de pêche[143]. Certaines espèces invasives peuvent mettre en danger l'herpétofaune locale. Ainsi, l'arrivée des rats amenés par les pionniers en Nouvelle-Zélande a été suivie par la disparition des sphénodons sur les îles principales, ces rongeurs s'attaquant aux pontes des reptiles. L'espèce invasive peut parfois être un autre reptile comme dans le cas des couleuvres originaires d'Europe continentale qui ont été introduites sur les îles Baléares, pour certaines depuis l'époque romaine et pour d'autres plus récemment, qui font disparaitre des lézards endémiques de l'archipel qui ne sont pas adaptés à ces prédateurs[144].

Entre 1970 et 2012, les populations de reptiles vivant dans les lacs et les rivières ont chuté de 72 %[145]

Mesures de sauvegarde

 src=
Avertissement légal posé à Boca Raton, en Floride.

En 2009 l'Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature (UICN) a dénombré 1 677 espèces de reptiles menacées et placées sur sa liste rouge, soit environ 28 % des espèces de reptiles que l'on compte dans le monde. Cette liste augmente très rapidement puisque pas moins de 293 espèces ont été rajoutées l'année suivante. 469 espèces sont considérées comme menacées d'extinction[146].

Afin de limiter l'exploitation des espèces en danger d'extinction, le commerce de reptiles sauvages est strictement réglementé, à travers la Convention sur le commerce international des espèces de faune et de flore sauvages menacées d'extinction (CITES), également parfois nommée convention de Washington. Ce document signé en 1973 comprend trois annexes qui regroupent les animaux sauvages suivant leur degré de protection. Les espèces les moins menacées peuvent ainsi toujours être commercialisées, mais seulement si le pays obtient un permis d'exportation. La vente d'espèces menacées d'extinction est en revanche interdite[147]. Malheureusement de nombreuses espèces de reptiles qui viennent d'être découvertes mais qui ne sont pas encore entièrement répertoriées par la CITES comme vulnérables ou menacées sont mises en vente sur internet sans aucune réglementation et risquent de disparaître très vite[148]. De plus, il est très difficile de contrôler le braconnage dans certains pays et beaucoup passent outre la convention. Certains pays adoptent des législations plus strictes, pouvant réglementer plus strictement ou interdire le commerce, mais aussi le transport de reptiles sauvages vivants ou morts[147].

Voir aussi

Ouvrages sur l'évolution des reptiles
  • (en) Monroe W. Strickberger, Evolution, Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2005, 722 p. (ISBN 9780763738242)
  • Henri Termier et Geneviève Termier, Histoire de la terre, Presses universitaires de France, 1979, 430 p.
  • Augé, M., & Rage, J. C. (2000). Les squamates (Reptilia) du Pliocène moyen de Sansan. Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, 143, 203-273.P

Ouvrages sur l'herpétologie et son histoire

  • André-Marie-Constant Duméril, Erpétologie générale, ou histoire naturelle complète des reptiles, Roret, 1834 (lire en ligne)
  • François Marie Daudin et Charles S. Sonnini, Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière des reptiles: ouvrage faisant suite à l'histoire naturelle générale et particulieère, composée par Leclerc de Buffon, et rédigée par C. S. Sonnini, membre de plusieurs sociétés savantes, Volume 1, Dufart, 1801, 584 p.
  • André M. Duméril et Georges Cuvier, Herpétologie ou histoire naturelle des reptiles, Baudoin, 1834, 100 p.

Ouvrages de biologie générale

  • (en) Belal E. Baaquie, Frederick H. Willeboordse, Exploring integrated science, CRC Press, 2009, 572 p. (ISBN 9781420087932)
  • Carl Gustav Carus, Traité élémentaire d'anatomie comparée: suivi de recherches d'anatomie philosophique où transcendante sur les parties primaires du système nerveux et du squelette intérieur et extérieur, et accompagné d'un atlas de 31 planches in-4o, gravées, J.-B. Baillière, 1835, 31 p.
  • Roger Eckert et David Randall (trad. François Math), Physiologie animale: mécanismes et adaptations, De Boeck Supérieur, 1999, 840 p. (ISBN 9782744500534)
  • Scott F. Gilbert (trad. Sylvie Rolin et Étienne Brachet), Biologie du développement, Biologie cellulaire et moléculaire, De Boeck Supérieur, 2004, 858 p. (ISBN 9782804145347)
  • Raymond Gilles et Michel Anctil, Physiologie animale Biologie animale, De Boeck Supérieur, 2006, 675 p. (ISBN 9782804148935)
  • (en) Dennis F. Kohn, Anesthesia and analgesia in laboratory animals, Academic Press, 1997, 426 p. (ISBN 9780124175709)
  • Thierry Lodé, La guerre des sexes chez les animaux: une histoire naturelle de la sexualité, Odile Jacob, 2007, 361 p. (ISBN 9782738119018)
  • Félix-Archimède Pouchet, Zoologie classique; ou, Histoire naturelle du règne animal, Volume 1, Roret, 1841
  • Société scientifique de Bruxelles, Union catholique des scientifiques français, Revue des questions scientifiques, vol. 123 à 124, Société scientifique de Bruxelles, 1952
  • Société scientifique de Bruxelles, Union catholique des scientifiques français et Hervé Le Guyader, Classification phylogénétique du vivant, vol. 123 à 124, Belin, 2001 (ISBN 2-7011-4273-3)

Ouvrages sur les reptiles

  • (en) Patricia Bartlett, Reptiles and Amphibians For Dummies, John Wiley and Sons, 2011, 360 p. (ISBN 9781118068816)
  • (en) Richard D. Bartlett et Patricia Pope Bartlett, Geckos, Barron's Educational Series, 2006, 95 p. (ISBN 9780764128554)
  • M. Bolton, L'élevage des crocodiles en captivité, Food & Agriculture Org., 1990, 15 p. (ISBN 9789252028758)
  • (fr) Teresa Bradley Bays et Teresa Lightfoot, Jörg Mayer (trad. Florence Almosni-Le Sueur), Comprendre le comportement des NAC: Oiseaux, reptiles et petits mammifères, Elsevier Masson, 2008, 419 p. (ISBN 9782294704611)
  • (fr) Jacques Brogard, Les maladies des reptiles, Point Vétérinaire, coll. « Médecine vétérinaire », 1992, 319 p. (ISBN 9782863261057)
  • (fr) Christophe Bulliot, Nouveaux animaux de compagnie: Aide aux soins, Éditions Point Vétérinaire, 2004, 184 p. (ISBN 9782863262030)
  • (fr) Jean-Philippe Chippaux, Venins de serpent et envenimations, IRD Editions, coll. « Didactiques », 2002, 288 p. (ISBN 9782709915076)
  • (fr) Collectif : Roland Bauchot, Cassian Bon, Patrick David et Jean-Pierre Gasc, Serpents, Éditions Artemis, 2005, 219 p. (ISBN 9782844164100)
  • (en) Carl Gans, Abbot S. Gaunt, Kraig Adler, Biology of the Reptilia: Morphology I; The skull and appendicular locomotor apparatus of Lepidosauria

Biology of the Reptilia, Morphology I Contributions to herpetology, vol. 21, Academic Press, coll. « Biology of the Reptilia », 2008, 781 p. (ISBN 9780916984779)

  • (fr) Paul Gervais, Reptiles vivants et fossiles, G. Baillière, 1869, 82 p.
  • (fr) Losange (Collectif), Amphibiens et reptiles, Artemis, coll. « Découverte nature », 2008, 127 p. (ISBN 9782844166500)
  • (fr) Mark O'Shea et Timothy R. Halliday, Reptiles et amphibiens, Larousse, coll. « L'Œil nature », 2005, 256 p. (ISBN 2035604230)
  • [PDF] (fr) Delphine Saint-Raymond Moynat, Les affections cutanées des reptiles, Maison Alfort, Thèse de médecine vétérinaire, 2008, 188 p. (lire en ligne)

Références taxinomiques

Notes et références

Notes

  1. Genèse 1:24
  2. Cette classification ne prend pas en compte les dernières[Quand ?] études moléculaires[Lesquelles ?] plaçant les tortues parmi les diapsides

Références

  1. a et b Définitions lexicographiques et étymologiques de « reptilien » dans le Trésor de la langue française informatisé, sur le site du Centre national de ressources textuelles et lexicales
  2. (fr) Paul D. Mac Lean, Les trois cerveaux de l'homme, Paris, Robert Laffont, 1970-78, 200 p. (ISBN 2-221-06873-4)
  3. Avec les cinq principaux clades représentés : Agnathes (lamproies), Chondrichthyens (requins, raies), Placodermes (fossiles), Acanthodiens (fossiles), Osteichthyens (poissons osseux).
  4. « Systématique : ordonner la diversité du vivant », Rapport sur la Science et la technologie No 11, Académie des sciences, Lavoisier, 2010, p. 65
  5. Louis Bourgey, Observation et expérience chez Aristote, Vrin, 1955, 161 p. (ISBN 9782711600847, lire en ligne), p. 133
  6. Duméril 1834, p. 229
  7. Duméril 1834, p. 237
  8. Carolus Linnaeus, Systema naturae per regna tria naturae: secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis., Holmiae (Laurentii Salvii), 1758, 10e éd.
  9. « Amphibia », Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9e édition,‎ 1878 (lire en ligne)
  10. (la) J.N. Laurenti, Specimen Medicum, Exhibens Synopsin Reptilium Emendatam cum Experimentis circa Venena, 1768 (lire en ligne)
  11. Duméril 1834, p. 239
  12. Duméril et Cuvier 1834, p. 5
  13. Daudin 1801, p. 330
  14. Duméril 1834, p. 244-245
  15. P. A. Latreille, Nouveau Dictionnaire à Histoire Naturelle, xxiv, 1804, « Familles naturelles du règne animal, exposés succinctement et dans un ordre analytique »
  16. (en) « § 6. Frankensteinosaurus: Reptile to Bird » (consulté le 24 octobre 2011)
  17. (en) T.H. Huxley, « The Structure and Classification of the Mammalia », Medical Times and Gazette, Hunterian lectures,‎ 1863 (lire en ligne)
  18. (en) E.S. Goodrich, « On the classification of the Reptilia », Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, vol. 89B,‎ 1916, p. 261–276 (DOI )
  19. (en) D.M.S. Watson, « On Millerosaurus and the early history of the sauropsid reptiles », Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B, Biological Sciences, vol. 240, no 673,‎ 1957, p. 325–400 (DOI )
  20. (en) « Myriapoda » (consulté le 7 novembre 2011)
  21. (en) Henry Fairfield Osborn, « The Reptilian subclasses Diapsida and Synapsida and Early History of Diaptosauria », Memoirs of the American Museum of Natural History, vol. 1,‎ 1903, p. 451–507
  22. (en) A.S. Romer, Vertebrate Paleontology, University of Chicago Press, 1933, 3e éd.
  23. (en) « Temporal Fenestration and the Classification of Amniotes », Tree of Life Web Project (consulté le 25 octobre 2011)
  24. « Reptiles, faunistique », biodis (consulté le 25 octobre 2011)
  25. (en) M.J. Benton, Vertebrate Paleontology, Londres, Blackwell Science Ltd, 2000, 2e éd. (ISBN 0-632-05637-1)
  26. a et b (en) M. Laurin et R. R. Reisz, « A reevaluation of early amniote phylogeny », Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, vol. 113,‎ 1995, p. 165–223 (DOI , lire en ligne)
  27. (en) O. Rieppel et M. DeBraga, « Turtles as diapsid reptiles », Nature, vol. 384, no 6608,‎ 1996, p. 453–5 (DOI )
  28. (en) R. Zardoya et A. Meyer, « Complete mitochondrial genome suggests diapsid affinities of turtles », Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 95, no 24,‎ 1998, p. 14226–14231 (ISSN , PMID , PMCID , DOI )
  29. (en) N. Iwabe, Y. Hara, Y. Kumazawa, K. Shibamoto, Y. Saito, T. Miyata et K. Katoh, « Sister group relationship of turtles to the bird-crocodilian clade revealed by nuclear DNA-coded proteins », Molecular Biology and Evolution, vol. 22, no 4,‎ 24 décembre 2004, p. 810–813 (PMID , DOI , lire en ligne, consulté le 31 décembre 2010)
  30. (en) Jonas Roos, Ramesh K. Aggarwal et Axel Janke, « Extended mitogenomic phylogenetic analyses yield new insight into crocodylian evolution and their survival of the Cretaceous–Tertiary boundary », Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, vol. 45, no 2,‎ novembre 2007, p. 663–673 (PMID , DOI )
  31. (en) Y. Katsu, E.L. Braun, L.J. Guillette Jr. et T. Iguchi, « From reptilian phylogenomics to reptilian genomes: analyses of c-Jun and DJ-1 proto-oncogenes », Cytogenetic and Genome Research, vol. 127, nos 2-4,‎ 17 mars 2010, p. 79–93 (PMID , DOI )
  32. (en) K. Brysse, « From weird wonders to stem lineages: the second reclassification of the Burgess Shale fauna », Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Biological and Biomedical Sciences, vol. 39, no 3,‎ 2008, p. 298–313 (PMID , DOI )
  33. (en) Colin Tudge, The Variety of Life, Oxford University Press, 2000 (ISBN 0198604262)
  34. a b et c (en) S.P. Modesto et J.S. Anderson, « The phylogenetic definition of Reptilia », Systematic Biology, vol. 53, no 5,‎ 2004, p. 815–821 (PMID , DOI , lire en ligne)
  35. (en) J. Gauthier, A.G. Kluge et T. Rowe, « The early evolution of the Amniota », dans M.J. Benton, The phylogeny and classification of the tetrapods, vol. 1 : amphibians, reptiles, birds, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1988, p. 103-155
  36. (en) Michael J. Benton, Vertebrate Palaeontology, Oxford, Blackwell Science Ltd., 2005, 3e éd. (ISBN 0632056371)
  37. (en) Laurin, M. et J.A. Gauthier, « Amniota. Mammals, reptiles (turtles, lizards, Sphenodon, crocodiles, birds) and their extinct relatives. », The Tree of Life Web Project, 1er janvier 1996
  38. (en) J. Muller et R.R. Reisz, « The phylogeny of early eureptiles: Comparing parsimony and Bayesian approaches in the investigation of a basal fossil clade », Systematic Biology, vol. 55,‎ 2006, p. 503-511 (DOI )
  39. « Morphologie d'une tortue » (consulté le 20 octobre 2011)
  40. Philippe Mespoulhé, « La Tortue verte de l'océan indien », Futura-sciences, 16 mars 2004 (consulté le 20 octobre 2011)
  41. « L'histoire des tortues », Terra nova (consulté le 7 novembre 2011)
  42. a et b Bulliot 2004, p. 78
  43. (fr) J. Lescure, Les tortues marines menacées actuellement par l'exploitation passée de l'écaille et de la viande, vol. 129 (Bulletin de la Société zoologique de France), Société zoologique de France, 2004
  44. « La ponte », Muséum national d'histoire naturelle (consulté le 7 novembre 2011)
  45. Encyclopædia Universalis, « CHÉLONIENS ou TORTUES : 2. Systématique, biogéographie, adaptations écologiques » (consulté le 7 novembre 2011)
  46. (en) Burnie David et Don E. Wilson, Animal: The Definitive Visual Guide to the World's Wildlife, New York, DK Publishing Inc., 2001, 624 p. (ISBN 0-7894-7764-5), p. 375
  47. (en) Matt Russell, « Tuatara, Relics of a Lost Age », Cold Blooded News, Colorado Herpetological Society, 1998 (consulté le 19 mai 2006)
  48. « Amphisbènes » (consulté le 25 octobre 2011)
  49. Gans, Gaunt et Adler 2008, p. 9
  50. Baaquie et Willeboordse 2009, p. 419
  51. « Les iguanes » (consulté le 25 octobre 2011)
  52. Bulliot 2004, p. 81
  53. a b c et d « Crocodile », Larousse (consulté le 30 septembre 2011)
  54. « Qu'est-ce qu'un reptile ? » (consulté en 25 octobre)
  55. Lecointre et Le Guyader 2001, p. 374
  56. Brogard 1992, p. 33
  57. Kohn 1997, p. 349
  58. Brogard 1992, p. 37
  59. a b c d et e Strickberger 2005, p. 417
  60. Gilles et Anctil 2006, p. 37
  61. a et b Losange 2008, p. 23
  62. O'Shea 2005, p. 21-23
  63. Chen X, Xu X, Ji X (2003) Influence of body temperature on food assimilation and locomotor performance in white-striped grass lizards, Takydromus wolteri (Lacertidae). Journal of Thermal Biology, 28, 385–391.
  64. Eckert et Randall 1999, p. 683
  65. (en) Aurélien Bernard, Christophe Lécuyer, Peggy Vincent, Romain Amiot, Nathalie Bardet, Eric Buffetaut, Gilles Cuny, François Fourel, François Martineau, Jean-Michel Mazin et Abel Prieur, « Regulation of Body Temperature by Some Mesozoic Marine Reptiles », Science,‎ 11 juin 2010
  66. a b et c (en) A.S. Romer et T.S. Parsons, The Vertebrate Body, Philadelphie, Saunders, 1977, 5e éd.
  67. (en) « Figure of relative brain size in vertebrates », Brainmuseum.org (consulté le 16 mars 2010)
  68. (en) Dennis King et Brian Green, Goannas: The Biology of Varanid Lizards, University of New South Wales Press, 1999 (ISBN 0-86840-456-X), p. 43
  69. (en) Tim Halliday et Kraig Adler, Firefly Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians, Hove, Firefly Books Ltd, 2002 (ISBN 1-55297-613-0), p. 112, 113, 144, 147, 168, 169
  70. André Beaumont, Pierre Cassier, Daniel Richard, Biologie animale. Les Cordés, Dunod, 2009, p. 208
  71. Membres: Les Grands Articles d'Universalis, Encyclopaedia Universalis, 2016 (lire en ligne), n.p..
  72. Pike, David A., Lígia Pizzatto, Brian A. Pike, and Richard Shine. 2008. Estimating survival rates of uncatchable animals : The myth of high juvenile mortality in reptiles. Ecology 89:607–611. https://dx.doi.org/10.1890/06-2162.1
  73. a et b O'Shea 2005, p. 28
  74. Dieter Zorn, « Les vipères d'Europe de l'Ouest » (consulté le 21 septembre 2011)
  75. (en) R. L. Paton, T. R. Smithson et J. A. Clack, « An amniote-like skeleton from the Early Carboniferous of Scotland », Nature, vol. 398,‎ 8 avril 1999, p. 508-513 (lire en ligne)
  76. (en) R. Monastersky, « Out of the Swamps, How early vertebrates established a foothold—with all 10 toes—on land », Science News, vol. 21,‎ 1999, p. 328 (lire en ligne)
  77. (en) H.J. Falcon-Lang, M.J. Benton et M. Stimson, « Ecology of early reptiles inferred from Lower Pennsylvanian trackways », Journal of the Geological Society, Londres, vol. 164,‎ 2007, p. 1113-1118 (lire en ligne)
  78. (en) « Earliest Evidence For Reptiles », Sflorg.com, 17 octobre 2007 (consulté le 16 mars 2010)
  79. (en) D. Palmer, The Marshall Illustrated Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals, Londres, Marshall Editions, 1999 (ISBN 1-84028-152-9), p. 62
  80. (en) M. Ruta, M.I. Coates et D.L.J. Quicke, « Early tetrapod relationships revisited », Biological Review, vol. 78,‎ 2003, p. 251-345 (lire en ligne)
  81. (en) M. Van Tuninen et E.A. Hadly, « Error in Estimation of Rate and Time Inferred from the Early Amniote Fossil Record and Avian Molecular Clocks », Journal of Mulecular Biology, vol. 59,‎ 2004, p. 267-276 (lire en ligne)
  82. (en) R. Coven, History of Life, Oxford, Blackwell science, 2000 (lire en ligne), p. 164
  83. a et b [PDF] (en) S. Sahney, M.J. Benton et H.J. Falcon-Lang, « Rainforest collapse triggered Pennsylvanian tetrapod diversification in Euramerica », Geology, vol. 38, no 12,‎ 2010, p. 1079–1082 (DOI , lire en ligne)
  84. Termier 1979, p. 200
  85. a et b (en) S. Sahney, M.J. Benton, et P.A. Ferry, « Links between global taxonomic diversity, ecological diversity and the expansion of vertebrates on land », Biology Letters, vol. 6, no 4,‎ 2010, p. 544–547 (PMID , PMCID , DOI , lire en ligne [PDF])
  86. a b et c (en) E.H. Colbert et M. Morales, Evolution of the Vertebrates: A History of the Backboned Animals Through Time, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, 4e éd. (ISBN 978-0-471-38461-8)
  87. Strickberger 2005, p. 422
  88. a et b Guillaume Lecointre, Guide critique de l'évolution, Belin, Paris, 2009 (ISBN 978-2-7011-4797-0)
  89. a et b (en) S. Sahney et M.J. Benton, « Recovery from the most profound mass extinction of all time », Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological, vol. 275, no 1636,‎ 2008, p. 759–65 (PMID , PMCID , DOI , lire en ligne [PDF])
  90. Strickberger 2005, p. 424
  91. Strickberger 2005, p. 425
  92. Strickberger 2005, p. 426
  93. Strickberger 2005, p. 427
  94. (en) J.A. Gauthier, « The diversification of the amniotes », Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution, Knoxville, Tennessee : The Paleontological Society, D. R. Prothero et R. M. Schoch,‎ 1994, p. 129-159
  95. a et b « The Reptile Database » (consulté le 19 août 2010)
  96. (en) Alfred Reginald Radcliffe-Brown, The Rainbow-Serpent Myth of Australia, vol. 56, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, 1926, p. 19-25
  97. (en) Enrique Florescano, The myth of Quetzalcoatl, JHU Press, 2002, 287 p. (ISBN 0801871018, lire en ligne)
  98. (fr) « La Guerre des Serpents n'aura pas lieu..." ou le Caducée est-il caduc ? », Annales Belges de Médecine Militaire, vol. 10,‎ 1996, p. 124-126
  99. « Le crocodile » (consulté en 1er octobre)
  100. « Sobek » (consulté le 2 octobre 2011)
  101. « Adam et Eve,le péché originel » (consulté en 2 octobre)
  102. (en) Ronald Binns et R. J. Bell, The Loch Ness Mystery Solved, Open Books, 1983, 228 p. (ISBN 0-7291-0139-8), p. 22
  103. (en) « Les 50 films ayant pour thématique : crocodile / reptile » (consulté le 19 octobre 2011)
  104. (en) « Les années 80 : animaux féroces et cadavres sanguinolents » (consulté le 21 octobre 2011)
  105. « 40 années de terreur : les mondes perdus » (consulté le 20 octobre 2011)
  106. « films et documentaires sur les dinosaures » (consulté le 21 octobre 2011)
  107. Jean-Pierre Fleury, « L'alligator n'est pas un crocodile, ni un caïman » (consulté le 22 septembre 2011)
  108. (fr) M. Bolton, L'élevage des crocodiles en captivité, Food and Agriculture Organisation, 1990, 15 p. (ISBN 9789252028758)
  109. a b et c (fr) Ivan Ineich, « Élevages de reptiles et de scorpions au Bénin, Togo et Ghana », Vingt-cinquième session du Comité pour les animaux, Genève,‎ 12 mai 2006 (lire en ligne)
  110. Arrêté du 8 octobre 2018 fixant les règles générales de détention d'animaux d'espèces non domestiques (lire en ligne).
  111. (en) B.L. Stuart, J. Smith, K. Davey, P. Din et S.G. Platt, « Homalopsine watersnakes : the harvest and trade from Tonle Sap, Cambodia », TRAFFIC Bulletin, vol. 18,‎ 2000, p. 115–124 (lire en ligne [PDF])
  112. (en) Z. Zhou et Z. Jiang, « International trade status and crisis for snake species in China », Conservation Biology, vol. 18,‎ 2004, p. 1386–1394 (lire en ligne [PDF])
  113. (en) L. Yiming et L. Dianmo, « The dynamics of trade in live wildlife across the Guangxi border between China and Vietnam during 1993-1996 and its control strategies », Biodiversity and Conservation, vol. 7,‎ 1998, p. 895-914 (lire en ligne)
  114. (en) James E. Barzyk, « Turtles in Crisis: The Asian Food Markets », Tortoise Trust (consulté le 3 octobre 2011)
  115. (en) « Recipes from Another Time », Smithsonian Magazine, octobre 2001 (consulté le 4 octobre 2011)
  116. Bolton 1990, p. 38-41
  117. a et b « Le commerce des animaux sauvages, 2ème marché illicite après la drogue » (consulté le 4 octobre 2011)
  118. « Le crocodile échappe aux fouilles des inspecteurs » (consulté le 4 octobre 2011)
  119. « Vêtements et ornements » (consulté le 4 octobre 2011)
  120. « L'application de la réglementation internationale et communautaire sur le commerce de la faune et de la flore sauvage dans les pays de l'élargissement » (consulté le 4 octobre 2011)
  121. « Utilisation des venins de serpent » (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  122. (fr) Anne-Sophie Cappio, La Conservation des tortues dans le monde : trois exemples, Lyon, Thèse de médecine vétérinaire, 2010
  123. (en) « Testudo hermanni », UICN
  124. (en) Tien-Hsi Chen, Hsien-Cheh Chang et Kuang-Yang Lue, « Unregulated Trade in Turtle Shells for Chinese Traditional Medicine in East and Southeast Asia: The Case of Taiwan », Chelonian Conservation and Biology, vol. 8,‎ 2009 (lire en ligne)
  125. « Terrariophilie » (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  126. (en) « Industry Statistics & Trends », APPA (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  127. (en) « Soaring reptile sales boost Pets at Home », The Guardian (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  128. « Éthique » (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  129. a et b « NAC exotiques : importations illégales et risques zoonotiques » [PDF] (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  130. « Espèces envahissante : La tortue de Floride » (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  131. « Vivariums » (consulté le 20 octobre 2011)
  132. (en) « Exhibits » (consulté le 20 octobre 2011)
  133. « Croisière de l'après-midi pour un saut de crocodile » (consulté le 20 octobre 2010)
  134. (en) « Charmeur de serpent » (consulté le 4 octobre 2011)
  135. Michelin, Martinique Guide vert, Michelin, 2010, 289 p. (ISBN 2067146289 et 9782067146280), p. 38
  136. Chippaux 2002, p. 199
  137. « Alligators de la Floride » (consulté le 30 septembre 2011)
  138. « Les dangers de l'Australie » (consulté le 30 septembre 2011)
  139. « Les conflits humains-faune : la problématique », FAO (consulté le 30 septembre 2011)
  140. Joël Martine, « Primatologie de la violence, de la non violence et du pouvoir », groupe de réflexion de l'association Mille Babords,‎ décembre 2005
  141. (en) Vanessa LoBue et Judy S. DeLoache, « Detecting the Snake in the Grass: Attention to Fear-Relevant Stimuli by Adults and Young Children », Psychological Science, vol. 19,‎ mars 2008, p. 284-289 (DOI )
  142. « Le taux de commerce de peaux de serpents pour les produits de luxe inquiète les spécialistes », CITES (consulté le 21 septembre 2011)
  143. « Les tortues marines restent menacées par le développement et la pêche, selon l'ONU » (consulté le 11 octobre 2011)
  144. J. Speybroeck, W. Beukema, B. Bok, J. van Voort, I. Velikov, Guide Delachaux des amphibiens et reptiles de France et d'Europe, éditions delachaux et niestlé, édition française de 2018 (édition originale de 2016), (ISBN 978-2-603-02534-5), pages 28 et 29.
  145. « En quarante ans, 88 % des grands animaux d’eau douce ont disparu », sur France 24, 14 août 2019
  146. « La crise de l'extinction gagne encore du terrain – UICN », UICN, 3 novembre 2009 (consulté le 1er octobre 2011)
  147. a et b « Législation : détention de reptiles et d'amphibiens », Inf'Faune (consulté le 1er octobre 2011)
  148. AFP / VNA / CVN, « Le commerce non-réglementé de reptiles menace la biodiversité », sur lecourrier.vn, Le courrier du Vietnam, 30 septembre 2020
La version du 7 mars 2012 de cet article a été reconnue comme « article de qualité », c'est-à-dire qu'elle répond à des critères de qualité concernant le style, la clarté, la pertinence, la citation des sources et l'illustration.
license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Reptile: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Reptilia

Les reptiles, au sens courant, regroupent des animaux à température variable (ectothermes), au corps souvent allongé et recouvert d'écailles. Ce groupement, autrefois désigné sous le taxon des Reptilia, incluait aussi des animaux comme les dinosaures non aviens, les ptérosaures, les ichthyosaures, les plésiosaures et les pliosaures, mais s'est révélé être non pertinent avec l'essor de la cladistique. Depuis l'apparition de la classification phylogénétique, un nombre croissant de chercheurs considèrent que le concept de « reptile » ne doit plus être utilisé dans la classification scientifique des espèces car il ne désigne pas un groupe monophylétique (constitué d'un ancêtre commun « reptilien » et de tous ses descendants), mais forme un regroupement paraphylétique d'espèces semblables par les caractères de l'ectothermie et des écailles, alors que les ancêtres communs de ce groupe ont aussi produit une descendance qui en est pourtant exclue car ne possédant pas de tels caractères : les oiseaux et les mammifères. Dans sa définition classique, les Reptilia sont en effet circonscrits à quatre ordres d'espèces contemporaines :

les crocodiliens : 30 espèces de crocodiles, gavials, caïmans et alligators ; les sphénodons : 1 espèce actuelle ; les squamates : environ 10 000 espèces de lézards (au sens large), serpents et amphisbènes (« lézards-vers ») ; les tortues : environ 340 espèces.

Ces lignées sont pourtant plus éloignées entre elles qu'avec d'autres lignées jugées non « reptiliennes » : par exemple, les crocodiliens sont plus proches des oiseaux — ils partagent notamment la présence d'une membrane nictitante et d'un gésier — qu'ils ne le sont des lézards ou des tortues. De plus, certains groupes fossiles autrefois considérés comme des « reptiles » possèdent des caractéristiques que n'ont pas les reptiles actuels : les ichtyosaures se sont révélés avoir été vivipares ; d'autres tels les ptérosaures étaient velus et enfin les dinosaures ont révélé parmi eux des formes à température constante (homéothermes) et parmi eux, les théropodes ont donné naissance aux oiseaux. C'est pourquoi depuis les années 1980 et l'essor d'une systématique essayant de retracer les relations de parenté entre les organismes, le regroupement des reptiles en tant que taxon a été abandonné par une majorité des scientifiques. Cet abandon a d'abord été acté dans le monde universitaire, avant d'être introduit dans le système scolaire dont l'enseignement primaire et secondaire français. En revanche, il est toujours largement utilisé dans le langage courant et comme une classe pratique dans la systématique évolutionniste, une école de taxinomie aujourd'hui minoritaire mais toujours active.

L'étude de ces animaux forme une des deux branches de l'herpétologie, l'autre étant l'étude des amphibiens, anciennement rapprochés des reptiles. Les premiers animaux à pouvoir être placés dans cette classe sont apparus sur Terre dès le Carbonifère, en même temps que les amniotes. Premiers vertébrés à pouvoir coloniser le milieu terrestre, ils se diversifient rapidement en de nombreuses espèces. Les reptiles sont aujourd'hui bien représentés avec plus de 9 000 espèces répertoriées en 2011, localisées surtout à proximité des tropiques, mais la vision traditionnelle selon laquelle le Mésozoïque aurait été un « âge des reptiles » suivi par un « âge des mammifères » est abandonnée, et l'on considère aujourd'hui qu'un « âge des dinosaures et des mammifères » a commencé au Trias et se poursuit de nos jours (puisque les oiseaux sont des dinosaures), tandis que le véritable « âge des reptiles » se place avant cela, au Permien, pour s'estomper au Trias.

Les reptiles ont, depuis toujours, intrigué ou fasciné les humains. Parce que certains sont capables de dévorer des humains (crocodiliens, grands varans) ou bien disposent de venins potentiellement mortels, parfois les reptiles inquiètent et font peur, parfois ils suscitent des phobies, mais d'autres fois ils sont sacralisés et sont l'objet d'une symbolique complexe. Omniprésents dans les mythologies du monde entier, ils ont inspiré l'imaginaire humain, servant par exemple de modèles aux dragons. D'autres suscitent de la sympathie, par exemple les tortues qui, dans certaines mythes, portent le monde sur leur dos. Depuis les dernières décennies, l'élevage de reptiles se développe dans le monde, pour fournir le marché de la viande dans certains pays consommateurs, mais surtout les marchés de la maroquinerie de luxe, qui utilise leurs peaux, et celui des nouveaux animaux de compagnie. Toutefois, le braconnage est également très répandu et met en danger de nombreuses espèces, malgré les tentatives de régulation du commerce d'animaux sauvages menées au niveau international. La pollution et la disparition des habitats des reptiles sont les autres principaux dangers auxquels ils sont exposés.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

파충류

provided by wikipedia 한국어 위키백과

파충류(爬蟲類, 라틴어: Reptila, 영어: Reptiles)는 용궁류(蜥形類, Sauropsida) 파충강(爬蟲綱)에 속하는 척추동물(脊椎動物)이다. 린네식 분류법으로 파충류로 분류 되는 동물들을 뜻하며, 공기로 호흡하고, "냉혈(冷血,Cold-Blooded)" 물질대사를 하고, 딱딱한 껍질을 갖고 양막(羊膜, amnion)을 지닌 알을 낳는다. 태생을 할 경우에도 유사한 막(membrane)이라는 시스템을 유지한다. 피부비늘껍질로 이루어져 있다. 네개의 다리를 지니거나 네발을 지닌 선조에서 유래한 네발동물(영어: Tetrapod)이며, (胚, embryo)가 양막이란 막(膜, membrae)에 의해 둘러쌓인 구조인 양막형 알(amniotic eggs)을 낳는다. 현재의 파충류들은 남극을 제외한 모든 대륙에 분포하며, 네 개의 목(目, order)으로 분류된다. 최근에는 조강과 함께 용궁류의 분기군(分岐群, Clade)으로 들어간다. 그러나 일반적인 의미의 파충류는 조강을 제외하고, 거북목을 포함한다.

대표적인 파충류에는 , 도마뱀, 카멜레온, 거북, 자라, 악어 등이 있다. 과거 번성했던 공룡은 파충류로 보고 있으며, 전설에 나오는 (dragon)은 파충류 모양을 본 뜬 것이다.

파충류는 양서류와 달리 물속에서 살아가는 유생 단계(예, 개구리의 올챙이, 도롱뇽의 올챙이 시기)를 거치지 않는다. 일반적으로 파충류는 알을 낳으며(oviparous (egg-laying)) 비늘을 가진 몇몇 종은 새끼를 낳는다. 새끼를 낳는 경우는 난태생 (ovoviviparity, 알이 만들어지지만 어미 몸 속에서 오래 머물면서 알을 깨고 나올 때 어미 몸 밖으로 배출됨)과 태생(viviparity, 석회질의 껍질을 만들지 않고 새끼를 출산함) 둘 중 하나이다. 태생(viviparous)을 하는 파충류들은 포유류의 태반과 닮은 다양한 형태의 태반을 이용하여 태아에게 영양분을 제공하며, 난태생하는 종의 경우에는 초기에 많은 영양분을 알 속에 넣어주고 알이 깨어날 때까지 돌봐준다.

현존하는 파충류들은 성체의 크기가 1.7 cm(0.6 in)인 작은 도마뱀붙이(게코 도마뱀, Sphaerodactylus ariasae)에서부터 길이가 6m, 몸무게가 1,000kg에 달하는 바다악어(Crocodylus porosus)까지 다양한 크기로 존재한다. 파충류를 연구하는 과학을 양서파충류학(兩棲爬蟲類學, Herpetology)이라 한다.

분류

분류의 역사

파충류들은 양서류들과 함께 분류되어 있던 부류에서 떨어져 나왔다. 보통의 살무사풀뱀 등이 물에서 사냥하는게 종종 보고되는 등, 종의 다양성이 적었던 스웨덴에서 연구를 했던 칼 폰 린네는 그의 저서, 자연의 체계에서 모든 파충류와 양서류를 "III-양서류"라는 하나의 강(class)으로 분류하였다.[1]

분류 체계

파충류의 계통수는 아래와 같다.

  • Mesosauridae과 (멸종)
  • Procolophonida목 (멸종)
  • 거북목(Testudines)

이 중 현존하는 종 가운데 조강을 제외하여 분류하면 다음과 같다.

계통 분류

다음은 2013년 피론(Pyron, R.A.) 등의 연구에 기초한 계통 분류이다.[2]

인룡상목    

옛도마뱀과

    뱀목

장님도마뱀과

unnamed
도마뱀붙이하목 뱀붙이도마뱀군  

돌도마뱀붙이과

     

뱀붙이도마뱀과

   

눈그늘도마뱀붙이과

      도마뱀붙이군  

표범도마뱀붙이과

도마뱀붙이상과

땅딸이도마뱀붙이과

     

잎가락도마뱀붙이과

   

도마뱀붙이과

         
unnamed
도마뱀상과    

밤도마뱀과

     

장갑도마뱀과

   

갑옷도마뱀과

       

도마뱀과

    Episquamata 장지뱀상과    

채찍꼬리도마뱀과

   

안경도마뱀과

      지렁이도마뱀류

플로리다지렁이도마뱀과

     

멕시코지렁이도마뱀과

     

지중해지렁이도마뱀과

     

쿠바지렁이도마뱀과

     

트로고노피스과

   

지렁이도마뱀과

             

장지뱀과

      Toxicofera    

무족도마뱀류

   

이구아나류

     

뱀아목

             

함께 읽기

각주

  1. 린네우스, 카를로스. 《Systema naturae per regna tria naturae :secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis.》. 지원되지 않는 변수 무시됨: |저작년도= (도움말)
  2. Pyron, R.A.; Frank T Burbrink, John J Wiens 2013. “A phylogeny and revised classification of Squamata, including 4161 species of lizards and snakes.”. 《BMC Evol Biol 13: 93》. CS1 관리 - 여러 이름 (링크)
 title=
license
ko
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

파충류: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia 한국어 위키백과

파충류(爬蟲類, 라틴어: Reptila, 영어: Reptiles)는 용궁류(蜥形類, Sauropsida) 파충강(爬蟲綱)에 속하는 척추동물(脊椎動物)이다. 린네식 분류법으로 파충류로 분류 되는 동물들을 뜻하며, 공기로 호흡하고, "냉혈(冷血,Cold-Blooded)" 물질대사를 하고, 딱딱한 껍질을 갖고 양막(羊膜, amnion)을 지닌 알을 낳는다. 태생을 할 경우에도 유사한 막(membrane)이라는 시스템을 유지한다. 피부비늘껍질로 이루어져 있다. 네개의 다리를 지니거나 네발을 지닌 선조에서 유래한 네발동물(영어: Tetrapod)이며, (胚, embryo)가 양막이란 막(膜, membrae)에 의해 둘러쌓인 구조인 양막형 알(amniotic eggs)을 낳는다. 현재의 파충류들은 남극을 제외한 모든 대륙에 분포하며, 네 개의 목(目, order)으로 분류된다. 최근에는 조강과 함께 용궁류의 분기군(分岐群, Clade)으로 들어간다. 그러나 일반적인 의미의 파충류는 조강을 제외하고, 거북목을 포함한다.

악어목(Crocodilia) - 23 종 옛도마뱀목(Sphenodontia) - 2 종. 뱀목(Squamata) - 도마뱀을 포함. 약 7,600 종 거북목(Testudines) - 약 300 종

대표적인 파충류에는 , 도마뱀, 카멜레온, 거북, 자라, 악어 등이 있다. 과거 번성했던 공룡은 파충류로 보고 있으며, 전설에 나오는 (dragon)은 파충류 모양을 본 뜬 것이다.

파충류는 양서류와 달리 물속에서 살아가는 유생 단계(예, 개구리의 올챙이, 도롱뇽의 올챙이 시기)를 거치지 않는다. 일반적으로 파충류는 알을 낳으며(oviparous (egg-laying)) 비늘을 가진 몇몇 종은 새끼를 낳는다. 새끼를 낳는 경우는 난태생 (ovoviviparity, 알이 만들어지지만 어미 몸 속에서 오래 머물면서 알을 깨고 나올 때 어미 몸 밖으로 배출됨)과 태생(viviparity, 석회질의 껍질을 만들지 않고 새끼를 출산함) 둘 중 하나이다. 태생(viviparous)을 하는 파충류들은 포유류의 태반과 닮은 다양한 형태의 태반을 이용하여 태아에게 영양분을 제공하며, 난태생하는 종의 경우에는 초기에 많은 영양분을 알 속에 넣어주고 알이 깨어날 때까지 돌봐준다.

현존하는 파충류들은 성체의 크기가 1.7 cm(0.6 in)인 작은 도마뱀붙이(게코 도마뱀, Sphaerodactylus ariasae)에서부터 길이가 6m, 몸무게가 1,000kg에 달하는 바다악어(Crocodylus porosus)까지 다양한 크기로 존재한다. 파충류를 연구하는 과학을 양서파충류학(兩棲爬蟲類學, Herpetology)이라 한다.

license
ko
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/