dcsimg

Description

provided by eFloras
Herbs perennial, woody based. Flowering stems prostrate or ascending, 4–30 cm tall, appressed pilose, or strigose throughout. Radical leaves 3–12 cm including petiole; stipules brown, membranous; petiole pilose; leaf blade 3-foliolate; leaflets shortly petiolulate or subsessile, oblong or obovate, 1–3 × 0.6–1.5 cm, abaxially appressed pilose, adaxially sparsely pilose or sometimes glabrous, base cuneate, margin 3–5-dentate, apex truncate; teeth triangular, rarely ovate and acute; cauline leaves 1 or 2, resembling radical ones but petiole shorter; stipules lanceolate or ovate, sparsely pilose, margin entire. Inflorescence terminal, compact, corymbose, 8–12-flowered. Flowers 4–6 mm in diam. Sepals ovate to triangular-ovate, apex acute; epicalyx segments much shorter than to nearly equaling sepals. Petals yellow, obovate-oblong, slightly or much shorter than sepals, apex rounded. Stamens ca. 5. Style lateral. Achenes glabrous. Fl. and fr. Jul–Aug.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Gansu, Jilin, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Xinjiang, Xizang, Yunnan [widely distributed in N temperate zone, extending N nearly to arctic circle].
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Habitat

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Forests, meadows on mountain slopes, dry mountain slopes, grasslands by lakes, rock crevices; 2400--4000 m.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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partner site
eFloras

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Sibbaldia procumbens I,. Sp. PI. 284. 1753
Poieniilla procumbens Clairv. Man. 166. 1811. Not P. procumbens Sibth. 1794.
Densely cespitose, or with numerous creeping scaly rootstocks ; flowering stems less than 1 dm. high, more or less hirsute-strigose, few-leaved ; stipules triangular-obovate to lanceolate ; basal leaves on slender petioles, ternate, sparingly appressed-pilose ; leaflets 1-2 cm. long, broadly cuneate, 3-5~toothed at the apex ; stem-leaves similar but shortpetioled ; flowers few in rather dense cymes ; hypanthium 3-4 mm. in diameter, somewhat pilose ; bractlets and sepals subequal, broadly oblong or ovate ; petals yellow, spatulate, shorter than the sepals.
Type locality : Lapland.
Distribution : Arctic and alpine regions of America from Greenland to Alaska and south in the mountains to New Hampshire, Colorado, and California ; also in arctic and alpine Europe and
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bibliographic citation
Per Axel Rydberg. 1908. ROSACEAE (pars). North American flora. vol 22(4). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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Sibbaldia procumbens

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Sibbaldia procumbens (or creeping sibbaldia) is a species of flowering plant of the genus Sibbaldia in the rose family.[1] It has an Arctic–alpine distribution; it can be found throughout the Arctic, as well as the at higher elevations in the mountains of Eurasia and North America. It grows on tundra and in alpine climates where snow remains year-round, and on subalpine mountain slopes. This is a low, mat-forming perennial herb producing clumps of herbage in rocky, gravelly substrate. A spreading stem up to 15 centimeters long grows from a caudex. Each leaf is divided into usually three leaflets borne at the end of a petiole up to 7 centimeters long. Each wedge-shaped leaflet has three teeth at the tip. The flower has usually five pointed green bractlets, five wider pointed green sepals, and five tiny yellowish petals each about a millimeter long. The fruits develop in the remnants of the sepals on erect stalks.

Distribution

Sibbaldia procumbens (5065856413).jpg

The plant has an Arctic–alpine distribution. It is found in the Pyrenees, in places in the Cantabrians and Sierra Nevada of Spain, in the Alps, the Vosges in France, on Corsica, in a few locations in the central Apennines, in the Tatras on the border of Slovakia and Poland, in Bulgaria's Rila and Pirin. In northern Europe, it grows in Scotland, on the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Jan Mayen and Svaalbard, throughout the Scandinavian Mountains, in northern Finland, in the northern Urals, and along the Arctic coastline of European Russia from the Kola peninsula in the west to the Gulf of Ob in the east.

The plant is also found in extensive areas in some of the Central Asian and South Siberian mountains, including Tian Shan, the Tarbagatay, Altai and Sayan ranges, and the Transbaikal highlands. There are occurrences in the mountains of western China (including in the provinces of Shaanxi, Sichuan and Yunnan), in the Changbai Mountains on the boundary with Korea, in the Japanese Alps, on the island of Sakhalin and in isolated areas on the nearby Russian mainland. It is widely distributed in eastern Kamchatka, in Chukotka, on the Aleut Islands, in parts of Alaska, and then across the constituent ranges of the North American Cordillera in western Canada and the United States, its continuous area reaching its southern limits in the San Bernardino Mountains in California, the San Francisco Peaks in Arizona and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico, with the species reappearing further south at high altitudes in the Transvolcanic Belt of central Mexico.

It is also found in the northeast of the continent: in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, in the Chic-Choc Mountains of the Gaspé region of Quebec, in the Long Range Mountains on Newfoundland, and then more sporadically further north in Canada: along the coasts of northern Quebec and Labrador, in some areas around Hudson Bay and in the south of Baffin Island. Finally, the plant is also known from both the western and the eastern coastal areas of Greenland.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

References

  1. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Sibbaldia procumbens". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  2. ^ Kurtto, Arto; Lampinen, Raino; Junikka, Leo (2004). Atlas florae Europaeae, distribution of vascular plants in Europe. 13: Rosaceae (Spiraea to Fragaria, excl. Rubus). Helsinki: Committee for mapping the flora of Europe and Societas Biologica Fennica. p. 271. ISBN 978-951-9108-14-8.
  3. ^ Meusel, Hermann; Jäger, E.; Weinert, E. (1965). Vergleichende Chorologie der zentraleuropäischen Flora. Vol. [Band I]. Jena: Fischer. K219.
  4. ^ "Sibbaldia procumbens". Flora of North America. eFloras.org. Retrieved 14 December 2021.
  5. ^ "Sibbaldia procumbens L." Flora of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Ottawa: NRC Research Press. 2007. Retrieved 14 December 2021.
  6. ^ "Sibbaldia procumbens". Flora of China. eFloras.org. Retrieved 14 December 2021.
  7. ^ Flora SSSR (in Russian). Vol. 10. Moscow/Leningrad: AN SSSR. 1941. pp. 224–26. [including Sibbaldia macrophylla].
  8. ^ Villaseñor, José Luis (2016). "Checklist of the native vascular plants of Mexico". Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad. 87 (3): 559–902. doi:10.1016/j.rmb.2016.06.017.

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Sibbaldia procumbens: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Sibbaldia procumbens (or creeping sibbaldia) is a species of flowering plant of the genus Sibbaldia in the rose family. It has an Arctic–alpine distribution; it can be found throughout the Arctic, as well as the at higher elevations in the mountains of Eurasia and North America. It grows on tundra and in alpine climates where snow remains year-round, and on subalpine mountain slopes. This is a low, mat-forming perennial herb producing clumps of herbage in rocky, gravelly substrate. A spreading stem up to 15 centimeters long grows from a caudex. Each leaf is divided into usually three leaflets borne at the end of a petiole up to 7 centimeters long. Each wedge-shaped leaflet has three teeth at the tip. The flower has usually five pointed green bractlets, five wider pointed green sepals, and five tiny yellowish petals each about a millimeter long. The fruits develop in the remnants of the sepals on erect stalks.

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