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Physical Description

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Annual, Herbs, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems or branches arching, spreading or decumbent, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs glabrous or sparsely glabrate, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules green, triangulate to lanceolate or foliaceous, Stipules persistent, Stipule s clasping stem at the base, Stipules adnate to petiole, Leaves compound, Leaves palmately 2-3 foliate, Leaflets dentate or denticulate, Leaflets 3, Leaves glabrous or nearly so, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescences globose heads, capitate or subcapitate, Inflorescence axillary, Inflorescence terminal, Bracteoles present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx glabrous, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals white, Petals pinkish to rose, Banner petal narrow or oblanceolate, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing petals auriculate, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Reduced cleistogamous flowers produced, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit indehiscent, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit orbicular to subglobose, Fruit or valves persistent on stem, Fruit enclosed in calyx, Fruit glabrous or glabrate, Fruit 1-seed ed, Fruit 2-seeded, Seeds cordiform, mit-shaped, notched at one end, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
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Trifolium buckwestiorum

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Trifolium buckwestiorum is a rare species of clover known by the common name Santa Cruz clover.[1]

Distribution

It is endemic to California, where it is known from nine or ten small occurrences in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and Sonoma Counties.[2] It may also occur in San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Mendocino Counties,[3] but its populations are very small and easily disturbed by threats such as vehicles, development, and feral pig activity.[2]

It grows in forest, woodland, and coastal prairie habitat.[4]

Description

It is an annual herb growing upright or decumbent in form, with hairless green or reddish herbage. The leaves are made up of finely toothed, oval shaped leaflets up to 1.5 centimeters long and bristle-tipped stipules.

The inflorescence is a head of flowers roughly a centimeter wide, the flowers held in a bowl-like involucre of wide, jagged-toothed bracts. Each flower has a calyx of sepals that narrow into fine bristles and a pink corolla under one centimeter long.

References

  1. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Trifolium buckwestiorum". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  2. ^ a b The Nature Conservancy
  3. ^ Elkhorn Slough Local Plant Profile
  4. ^ California Native Plant Society Rare Plant Profile

Further reading

  • Isley, D. (1992). Innovations in California Trifolium and Lathyrus. Madroño 39(2):90–97.

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Trifolium buckwestiorum: Brief Summary

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Trifolium buckwestiorum is a rare species of clover known by the common name Santa Cruz clover.

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