dcsimg

Ostreoidea

provided by wikipedia EN

Ostreoidea is a taxonomic superfamily of bivalve marine mollusc, sometimes simply identified as oysters,[1] containing two families. The ostreoids are characterized in part by the presence of a well developed axial rod.[2] Anal flaps are known to exist within the family Ostreidae but not within the more-primitive Gryphaeidae.[3] The scar from the adductor muscle is simple, with a single, central scar.[4] In the majority, the right valve is less convex than the left.[5]

Anatomy

Harold Harry (1985) gives a detailed description of the morphological and anatomical features that are common in the superfamily. [6] In this section, oyster is used to mean "members of Ostreoidea".

Oysters of this group generally attach to a substrate by cementing their left valve to it. The two valves are unequal: the attached left valve is larger and more cupped than the right 'lid' (to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the species).

The lips of the mantle lobes are joined at the edge opposite the hinge (ventral or posteroventral edge, the hinge is conventionally designated as the dorsal direction). This forms two chambers, one on either side of the visceral mass. The ingress chamber is anatomically anterior and the egress chamber is posterior.[6]: 123–124  Within Ostreoidea, the degree of attachment of the left and right mantle lobes to the visceral mass varies between subgroups. The may be one (right) or two passages (left and right), or none, around the body between the adductor and hinge (termed either supramyal or promial passages).[6]: 125 

Oysters are monomyarian, having one adductor muscle. This is the posterior of the ancestral pair; the anterior muscle is not present in post-larval stages. The adductor is divided into visible halves of translucent "quick" muscle tissue and opaque "catch" tissue. Oysters also lack a foot and the associated body muscles: the foot disappears in early larval stages. This is in contrast to other bivalves with reduced or missing feet where the process occurs later in development.[6]: 123 

References

  1. ^ G. M. Barker (2004). Natural Enemies of Terrestrial Molluscs. CABI. p. 326. ISBN 978-0-85199-061-3.
  2. ^ Elizabeth Harper; John David Taylor; J. Alistair Crame (2000). The Evolutionary Biology of the Bivalvia. Geological Society of London. p. 175. ISBN 978-1-86239-076-8.
  3. ^ Norman Dennis Newell (1998). Bivalves: an eon of evolution : paleobiological studies honoring Norman D. Newell. University of Calgary. p. 28. ISBN 978-1-55238-005-5.
  4. ^ Eugene V. Coan; Paul Valentich Scott; F. R. Bernard (2000). Bivalve seashells of western North America: marine bivalve mollusks from Arctic Alaska to Baja California. Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. p. 52. ISBN 978-0-936494-30-2.
  5. ^ Ashraf M.T. Elewa (9 June 2010). Morphometrics for Nonmorphometricians. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 163. ISBN 978-3-540-95852-9.
  6. ^ a b c d Harry, Harold W. (1985). "Synopsis of the supraspecific classification of living oysters (Bivalvia: Gryphaeidae and Ostreidae)". The Veliger. 28 (2): 121–158. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Ostreoidea: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ostreoidea is a taxonomic superfamily of bivalve marine mollusc, sometimes simply identified as oysters, containing two families. The ostreoids are characterized in part by the presence of a well developed axial rod. Anal flaps are known to exist within the family Ostreidae but not within the more-primitive Gryphaeidae. The scar from the adductor muscle is simple, with a single, central scar. In the majority, the right valve is less convex than the left.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Ostreoidea

provided by wikipedia FR

Ostreoidea est le nom scientifique d'une super-famille qui regroupe des genres de coquillages évoquant l'huître, dont Ostrea edulis, l'huître indigène européenne. Certaines de ces huîtres constituaient des bancs importants qui ont donné lieu à des roches calcaires très fossilifères.

Taxonomie

Les familles de Ostreoidea étaient considérés comme faisant partie de Pterioidea, mais sont maintenant classées comme Ostreoida Raf., 1815 parce que ce sont des familles d'huîtres « vraies » (dont les espèces commerciales destinées à la consommation), tandis que les familles de Pterioidea sont des huîtres perlières tropicales.

Ce groupe au caractère polymorphe n'est pas encore consensuellement défini du point de vue de la systématique[1].

Selon World Register of Marine Species (18 avril 2016)[2] :

Intérêt pour la géologie et l'étude des paléoenvironnements

Cette super-famille, bien que d'une diversité moyenne, a connu un grand succès biologique (en termes de biomasse produite et de nombre d’individus fossilisés dans certaines coupes géologiques), ce qui a justifié une thèse[3]pour étudier son intérêt paléographique. Les formes fossiles de cette superfamille présentent une grande stabilité morphologique des espèces au cours du temps et elles pourraient en effet aider à la datation de roches anciennes, tout en présentant un intérêt comme biomarqueur ou marqueur paléoenvironnemental.

La coquille de ces huîtres pourrait être utilisées (via des analyses des isotopes stables C&O) dans leurs stries de croissance pour mieux comprendre les interactions passées entre océan et climat. Une pycnodonte contemporaine bioconstructrice (Pycnodonte biauriculata) a été étudiée de ce point de vue pour caler des modèles d'analyse rétroactive basés sur l'étude de fossiles (analyse sclérochronologique, c'est-à-dire des incréments coquilliers qui font la croissance de la coquille de l'espèce).

Voir aussi

Références taxinomiques

Notes et références

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Ostreoidea: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Ostreoidea est le nom scientifique d'une super-famille qui regroupe des genres de coquillages évoquant l'huître, dont Ostrea edulis, l'huître indigène européenne. Certaines de ces huîtres constituaient des bancs importants qui ont donné lieu à des roches calcaires très fossilifères.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR