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Triteleia laxa is very common at low altitudes in central California, growing under a variety of ecological conditions, with wide attendant variation, especially in flower size. It could be considered a species complex (like T. ixioides) made up of many forms, with consistent differences in chromosome number and in the size and shape of the anthers (M. P. Burbanck 1944). The flowers can be quite large or small, and usually are pale blue, but sometimes are white or deep bluish purple. These morphologies often intergrade, making it difficult to recognize formal varieties.

This species may occur in southwestern Oregon, but documentation of its presence there is lacking. Triteleia ×tubergenii L. W. Lenz is a cultivated amphidiploid hybrid between T. laxa and T. peduncularis (L. W. Lenz 1970).

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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of North America Vol. 26: 339, 340, 344, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Description

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Leaves 20–40 cm × 4–25 mm. Scape 10–70 cm, smooth or scabrous near base. Flowers: perianth usually pale blue, sometimes deep bluish purple or white, 18–47 mm, tube attenuate at base, 12–25 mm, lobes gradually spreading, 8–20 mm; stamens attached alternately at 2 levels, horizontal and curved upward at apex, nearly equal; filaments linear, 3–6 mm, apical appendages present near base of adnate portion of filaments, membranous; anthers white to bluish, 2–5 mm, apex blunt to tapered; ovary 1/3–1/2 as long as stipe, either central or along proximal side of flower; pedicel ascending or spreading, often bent at apex, 1–10 cm. 2n = 16, 18, 28 (30), 32, 42, 48.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 339, 340, 344, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Distribution

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Calif.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 339, 340, 344, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering spring (Apr--Jun).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 339, 340, 344, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Habitat

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Open forests, mixed conifer or foothill woodlands, grasslands on clay soil; 0--1500m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 339, 340, 344, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Brodiaea candida (Greene) Baker; B. laxa (Bentham) S. Watson; B. laxa var. candida (Greene) Jepson; B. laxa var. nimia Jepson; B. laxa var. tracyi Jepson; Hookera laxa (Bentham) Kuntze; Milla laxa (Bentham) Baker; Seubertia laxa (Bentham) Kunth; S. obscura Borzí; Triteleia angustiflora A. Heller; T. candida Greene
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 339, 340, 344, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors
Triteleia laxa is an attractive blue to blue-purple wildflower which occurs in southwestern Oregon to northwestern/central-west California. The species is found on forest floors and grasslands, most typically occurring on clay soils. Plant height does not generally exceed 70 centimeters. The common name of the species was taken from Ithuriel, an angel in Milton's Paradise Lost. According to Milton, this wondrous spear caused everything it touched to assume its true form.
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Triteleia laxa

provided by wikipedia EN

Triteleia laxa (previously Brodiaea laxa) is a triplet lily known by several common names, including Ithuriel's spear,[1] common triteleia and grassnut. It is native to California where it is a common wildflower, and it is occasionally found in southwestern Oregon. It bears a tall, naked stem topped with a spray of smaller stalks, each ending in a purple or blue flower. The flower is tubular, opening into a sharply six-pointed star. The plant grows from a corm which is edible and similar in taste and use as the potato.[2] The most used common name for the species, Ithuriel's spear, is a reference to the angel Ithuriel from Milton's Paradise Lost.

Cultivation

Hardiness: USDA 6-10

Etymology

The genus name Triteleia is derived from Greek and means 'triplicate', a reference to its flower parts, which are in multiples of three. The epithet laxa means 'open', 'uncrowded', 'distant', 'spreading', or 'lax'.[3] It is derived from the Latin adjective laxus, meaning 'flaccid, loose'.[4]

References

  1. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Triteleia laxa". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 16 December 2015.
  2. ^ Chesnut, V K (1900–1902), Plants used by the Indians of Mendocino County, California, vol. 7, Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, pp. 327–329
  3. ^ Gledhill, David (2008). "The Names of Plants". Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521866453 (hardback), ISBN 9780521685535 (paperback). pp 232, 388
  4. ^ Stearn, W.T. (2004). Botanical Latin (4th (p/b) ed.). Portland, Oregon: Timber Press. p. 439. ISBN 978-0-7153-1643-6.

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Triteleia laxa: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Triteleia laxa (previously Brodiaea laxa) is a triplet lily known by several common names, including Ithuriel's spear, common triteleia and grassnut. It is native to California where it is a common wildflower, and it is occasionally found in southwestern Oregon. It bears a tall, naked stem topped with a spray of smaller stalks, each ending in a purple or blue flower. The flower is tubular, opening into a sharply six-pointed star. The plant grows from a corm which is edible and similar in taste and use as the potato. The most used common name for the species, Ithuriel's spear, is a reference to the angel Ithuriel from Milton's Paradise Lost.

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