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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

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Maximum longevity: 15.3 years (captivity) Observations: One captive specimen lived 15.3 years (Richard Weigl 2005).
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Behavior

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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Conservation Status

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There are no special conservation efforts for this species. They are able to coexist with human habitation to a greater extent than many other species, and in some areas they are considered a pest and their population is controlled.

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Benefits

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Bushbucks cause or are involved in a number of problems. Perhaps most seriously, their populations are controlled in areas near domestic cattle. Since bushbuck live among the trees and shrubs associated with rivers, they are frequently bitten by tsetse flies, which could then infect the cattle with nagana (sleeping sickness). Bushbuck cause damage in pine forestry areas by nibbling the tops of the young trees, resulting in excessive branching. Also, they frequently live on the outskirts of towns and cities, and in these areas they damage peoples' gardens.

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Benefits

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These antelopes have been hunted as a food source.

Positive Impacts: food

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Trophic Strategy

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Bushbucks are browsers. They eat herbs and the leaves, twigs, and flowers of a large number of plant species. Although they will eat a wide variety of plant species when hungry, they are somewhat selective when possible, prefering knobbly creeper and sausage tree. They will also occasionally eat fresh grass.

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Distribution

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Throughout central Africa, from south of the Sahara to north of the Kalahari deserts.

Biogeographic Regions: ethiopian (Native )

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Habitat

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Bushbucks can be found throughout their broad distribution wherever there is adequate cover for concealment, nearly irrespective of altitude or aridity. They live in forest edges or brushy cover associated with rivers and streams. During the night they move out of their home thicket to somewhat more open areas to feed.

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; forest ; rainforest ; scrub forest

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Life Expectancy

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Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
15.3 years.

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Morphology

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Male bushbucks are bigger than females, with weights ranging from 40 to 80 kg and shoulder heights from 70 to 100 cm. Females weigh about 25 to 60 kg and are 65 to 85 cm tall. Only males have horns, which usually spiral once and are fairly straight, parallel to one another, and up to a half meter long. Females are usually a lighter brown than males. Both sexes have white spots and stripes, the patterns of which vary geographically.

Range mass: 25 to 80 kg.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Reproduction

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Young can be born at any time of year, but in arid regions there is a peak in birth rates during the rainy season. Gestation requires only 180 days, allowing a female to produce more than one calf per year. A single calf weighing about 4 kg is born. The calf does not follow its mother out into the open to forage until it is four months old. It remains hidden in the dense underbrush in the mean time, and its mother returns periodically to let it nurse. Sexual maturity is reached at one year, but males' horns do not reach full size until three years of age.

Range number of offspring: 1 (low) .

Average number of offspring: 1.

Range gestation period: 5.93 to 6.23 months.

Average gestation period: 5.99 months.

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

Average birth mass: 3800 g.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female)
Sex: female:
496 days.

Parental Investment: altricial ; post-independence association with parents

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Ciszek, D. 1999. "Tragelaphus scriptus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tragelaphus_scriptus.html
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Deborah Ciszek, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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Harnessed bushbuck

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The bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) is the nominate taxon of the bushbuck. It is a small to medium-sized antelope widespread in Africa. The Cape bushbuck is a southern and eastern subspecies which is recognised by some authors, which found evidence to consider the northern and southern populations to belong to a different subspecies in 2007.[1][2]

Taxonomy

19 genetically-based groupings were found in a 2007 study, some do not correspond to previously described subspecies, eight of these were grouped under the nominate taxon. Former subspecies included as synonyms to the nominate taxon are phaleratus, bor and dodingae.[3]

As the first of the bushbucks to be described by Pallas in 1766 as Antilope scripta from Senegal, it retains the original species name for the bushbuck.

Description

Bushbucks in general smaller are than other tragelaphines, with a mainly red or yellow-brown ground colour. According to Moodley et al., the males of the West African population are more often striped than those in East or Southern Africa, although bushbuck with striping occur throughout the range.

Distribution

The nominate taxon occurs in Senegal, Gambia, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Ghana and in the Niger Basin in Nigeria as far east as the Cross River, south of the Bamenda Highlands through Cameroon, Chad, the Central African Republic to the Nile in South Sudan (?) and northern Uganda, Gabon, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo to northern Angola.[3]

Ecology

It is common across its broad geographic distribution and is found in wooded savannas, forest-savanna mosaics, rainforests, in montane forests and semi-arid zones. It does not occur in the deep rainforests of the central Congo Basin.

References

  1. ^ Moodley Y, Bruford MW, Bleidorn C, Wronski T, Apio A, Plath M (2008) Analysis of mitochondrial DNA data reveals non-monophyly in the bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) complex. Mammalian Biology, doi:10.1016/j.mambio.2008.05.003
  2. ^ Wronski T, Moodley Y. (2009) Bushbuck, harnessed antelope or both? Gnusletter, 28(1):18-19.
  3. ^ a b Moodley Y, Bruford MW. (2007) Molecular biogeography: Towards an integrated framework for conserving pan-African biodiversity. PLoS ONE. 2:e454.
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Harnessed bushbuck: Brief Summary

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The bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) is the nominate taxon of the bushbuck. It is a small to medium-sized antelope widespread in Africa. The Cape bushbuck is a southern and eastern subspecies which is recognised by some authors, which found evidence to consider the northern and southern populations to belong to a different subspecies in 2007.

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