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Gloiocephala

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Gloiocephala is a genus of fungi in the family Physalacriaceae. The genus is widespread, though mainly known from tropical and sub-tropical areas, and contains about 30 species.[1]

The mushrooms of this group are very small and grow on stems and leaves of monocotyledonous plants, such as sedges, usually in wet places. In most species their fruiting bodies do not develop into a typical mushroom form - the gills are often reduced to vein-like structures or completely missing, and the stipe may be asymmetrical, short or absent.[2][3]

There are five species which grow in Europe: G. caricis, G. cerkesii, G. cornelii, G. menieri and G. pseudocaricis.[2]

Species

References

  1. ^ Kirk PM, Cannon PF, Minter DW, Stalpers JA (2008). Dictionary of the Fungi (10th ed.). Wallingford, UK: CAB International. p. 285. ISBN 978-0-85199-826-8.
  2. ^ a b Antonín, V.; Noordeloos, M. E. (2010). A monograph of marasmioid and collybioid fungi in Europe. Postfach 1119, 83471 Berchtesgaden, Germany: IHW Verlag. pp. 413–414. ISBN 978-3-930167-72-2.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location (link)
  3. ^ Knudsen, H.; Vesterholt, J., eds. (2018). Funga Nordica Agaricoid, boletoid, clavarioid, cyphelloid and gasteroid genera. Copenhagen: Nordsvamp. p. 329. ISBN 978-87-983961-3-0.
  4. ^ Desjardin DE, Martínez-Peck L, Rajchenberg M (1995). "An unusual psychrophilic aquatic agaric from Argentina". Mycologia. 87 (4): 547–50. doi:10.2307/3760774. JSTOR 3760774.
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Gloiocephala: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Gloiocephala is a genus of fungi in the family Physalacriaceae. The genus is widespread, though mainly known from tropical and sub-tropical areas, and contains about 30 species.

The mushrooms of this group are very small and grow on stems and leaves of monocotyledonous plants, such as sedges, usually in wet places. In most species their fruiting bodies do not develop into a typical mushroom form - the gills are often reduced to vein-like structures or completely missing, and the stipe may be asymmetrical, short or absent.

There are five species which grow in Europe: G. caricis, G. cerkesii, G. cornelii, G. menieri and G. pseudocaricis.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
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