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Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Agrimonia striata Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 287. 1803
Agrimonia Brittoniana Bickn. Bull. Torrey Club 23: 517. 1896.
Perennial, with a stout rootstock and fibrous roots; stem 3-20 dm. high, sometimes 1 cm. thick at the base, hirsute with spreading hairs and glandular-papillose; stipules lanceolate or semi-ovate, laciniate with lanceolate, acuminate teeth; petiole and rachis of the leaves hirsute; principal leaflets 7-13, directed forward, strongly veined, dark-green and more or less hispidulous or scabrous above, paler, copiously glandular-granuliferous and more or less pubescent 395
beneath, especially on the veins, lanceolate, elliptic, oblanceolate, or rhombic-obovate, acute at the base, acuminate at the apex, sharply serrate with lanceolate mucronulate teeth, 3-10 cm. long; interposed leaflets 1-3 pairs in each interval, often alternately arranged, usually toothed; peduncles finely pubescent with ascending or appressed hairs, 3-5 dm. long; pedicels ascending, 2-5 cm. long; bracts lanceolate, 3-cleft; bractlets ovate, acuminate; sepals 1.5 mm. long, triangular-ovate, strongly 3-ribbed; petals deep-yellow, obovate, 3 mm. long; fruiting hypanthium when mature strongly reflexed, about 5 mm. long, turbinate, 4 mm. thick, strongly ribbed, glandulargranuliferous and in the grooves strigose, with a low thick rim; bristles in 3-4 series, erect or connivent.
Type locality: Canada.
Distribution: Roadsides, open woods, and copses, from Nova Scotia to West Virginia, New Mexico, and British Columbia.
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bibliographic citation
Per Axel Rydberg. 1913. ROSACEAE (pars). North American flora. vol 22(5). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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North American Flora

Agrimonia striata

provided by wikipedia EN

Agrimonia striata (roadside agrimony, grooved agrimony,[1] agrimony, cocklebur, woodland agrimony,[2] woodland grooveburr[3]) is a species of perennial forb belonging to the rose family (Rosaceae). It grows to about 40 inches (1m) producing a dense cluster (raceme) of 5-parted yellow flowers on a hairy stalk above pinnately-divided leaves.[1] It is native to the United States, Canada, and Saint Pierre and Miquelon.[4] It is susceptible to downy mildew caused by the oomycete species Peronospora agrimoniae.[5]

The species name striata means "striped".[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point Archived 2011-09-28 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 2010-03-13.
  2. ^ Gustave J. Yaki@Talk About Wildlife Archived 2011-07-06 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 2010-03-13.
  3. ^ ITIS Standard Report Page: Agrimonia Striata Retrieved 2010-03-13.
  4. ^ PLANTS Profile for Agrimonia striata Retrieved 2010-03-13.
  5. ^ Constantinescu, O. (1991). "An annotated list of Peronospora names". Thunbergia. 15.
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Agrimonia striata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Agrimonia striata (roadside agrimony, grooved agrimony, agrimony, cocklebur, woodland agrimony, woodland grooveburr) is a species of perennial forb belonging to the rose family (Rosaceae). It grows to about 40 inches (1m) producing a dense cluster (raceme) of 5-parted yellow flowers on a hairy stalk above pinnately-divided leaves. It is native to the United States, Canada, and Saint Pierre and Miquelon. It is susceptible to downy mildew caused by the oomycete species Peronospora agrimoniae.

The species name striata means "striped".

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