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Biology

provided by Antweb
A denizen of xeric habitats, P. apache nests in sizable dead branches (1-12 cm diameter) of various trees (especially live oaks) and large woody shrubs, usually taking advantage of beetle-bored cavities. By state and country. nest-site records are as follows (Ward, 1985):Texas: Prosopis glandulosa, Quercus grisea.Arizona: Populus sp., Prosopis sp., Quercus arizonica, Q. emoryi, Q. grisea, Q. oblongifolia, Q. turbinella.California: Arctostaphylos manzanita, Fraxinus gall, Pinus attenuata cone, Quercus chrysolepis, Q. wislizenii, Umbellularia californica.Mexico: Prosopis sp., Quercus emoryi, Q. fusiformis, Q. oblongifolia, Q. santaclarensis.Ward (1985) dissected 13 nests (from Texas, Arizona and California), of which five contained no dealate females, six contained a single queen, one contained two functional (i.e. inseminated) queens, and one contained 6 dealate queens. Thus, this species is at least occasionally polygynous and, judging from the queenless nests, polydomous. For two of the five queenless nests, queenright nests were located on the same tree or shrub.Ward (1985) recorded two observations of lone foraging (presumably colony founding) dealate queens: one on the trunk of a Quercus arizonica tree in September (Arizona) and the other on an Arctostaphylos bush in February (northern California). The latter queen was dissected and found to be inseminated but possessing preoviposition ovaries (ovarioles short; corpora lutea absent). Alates of P. apache have been collected in March, April, and July to November, suggesting that mating may occur in more than one season.CaliforniaPseudomyrmex apache is found throughout most of California except the mountains and extreme north. It occurs in chaparral, oak woodland, mixed (oak-pine-douglas fir) forest, coastal sage scrub, and desert riparian sites. Nests have been collected in dead branches of Arctostaphylos, Baccharis, Quercus and Umbellularia. There are also records from a Fraxinus gall and a Pinus attenuata cone. Workers appear to be generalist scavengers. Alates are produced sporadically throughout the year.
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AntWeb. Version 8.45.1. California Academy of Science, online at https://www.antweb.org. Accessed 15 December 2022.
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Distribution Notes

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Pseudomyrmex apache ranges from California to east Texas, and south into northern Mexico (Ward, 1985).
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AntWeb. Version 8.45.1. California Academy of Science, online at https://www.antweb.org. Accessed 15 December 2022.
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Identification

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Worker:median clypeal lobe laterally roundedeyes relatively short, such that scape length subequal to eye length (SL/EL 0.90-1.00)minimum distance between frontal carinae subequal to basal width of scapemoderate size (HW 0.83-1.04)standing pilosity sparse (generally absent from mesonotum and propodeum)
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AntWeb. Version 8.45.1. California Academy of Science, online at https://www.antweb.org. Accessed 15 December 2022.
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Taxonomic History

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Pseudomyrmex apache Creighton, 1953b PDF: 134, pl. 12, figs. 1-7 (w.q.m.) U.S.A. Nearctic. AntCat AntWiki HOL

Taxonomic history

Wheeler & Wheeler, 1956 PDF: 380 (l.).See also: Creighton, 1954 PDF: 9; Ward, 1985b PDF: 229.
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AntWeb. Version 8.45.1. California Academy of Science, online at https://www.antweb.org. Accessed 15 December 2022.
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Distribution

provided by Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico
S. Tex., s. N. Mex., s. Ariz., s. Calif.; n. Mexico.
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Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. 1979. Prepared cooperatively by specialists on the various groups of Hymenoptera under the direction of Karl V. Krombein and Paul D. Hurd, Jr., Smithsonian Institution, and David R. Smith and B. D. Burks, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute. Science and Education Administration, United States Department of Agriculture.

General Ecology

provided by Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico
Most colonies have been found in sizeable limbs or trunks of species of Quercus and Prosopis.
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Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. 1979. Prepared cooperatively by specialists on the various groups of Hymenoptera under the direction of Karl V. Krombein and Paul D. Hurd, Jr., Smithsonian Institution, and David R. Smith and B. D. Burks, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute. Science and Education Administration, United States Department of Agriculture.

Pseudomyrmex apache

provided by wikipedia EN

Pseudomyrmex apache is a species of ant in the family Formicidae.[1][2][3][4]

Pseudomyrmex apache casent0005440 dorsal 1.jpg
Pseudomyrmex apache casent0005440 head 1.jpg

References

  1. ^ "Pseudomyrmex apache Report". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2019-09-23.
  2. ^ "Pseudomyrmex apache". GBIF. Retrieved 2019-09-23.
  3. ^ "Pseudomyrmex apache species Information". BugGuide.net. Retrieved 2019-09-23.
  4. ^ "AntWeb". California Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 2019-07-02.
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Pseudomyrmex apache: Brief Summary

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Pseudomyrmex apache is a species of ant in the family Formicidae.

Pseudomyrmex apache casent0005440 dorsal 1.jpg Pseudomyrmex apache casent0005440 head 1.jpg
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