dcsimg

Behavior

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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Conservation Status

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Black-mantled Tamarins are threatened by forest destruction throughout their range. The subspecies S. nigricollis hernandezi of southern Colombia is considered vulnerable by IUCN.

(Nowak, 1991)

CITES: appendix ii

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Benefits

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There are no adverse effects of Black-mantled Tamarins.

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Benefits

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Tamarins are charismatic members of intact tropical forests, making them potentially valuable for ecotourism. Some animals continue to be taken for the pet trade.

Positive Impacts: pet trade ; ecotourism

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Associations

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Tamarins are important in their ecosystems as predators of insects and other invertebrates, and as prey animals for large predators. They may also disperse seeds from the fruits they eat.

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Trophic Strategy

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Saguinus nigricollis spends 34.8% of the day foraging for insects, particularly large orthopterans, and 17% of the day searching for plant food. They feed on a variety of vegetation like fruits, seeds, flowers, nectar, and gum that includes 41 different species of plants. Adult black-mantled tamarins catch flying insects with their mouth and larger insects with their hands. These insects are shared with the infants and juveniles. Large grasshoppers, a favorite food, are eaten headfirst in about 5 minutes.

Animal Foods: insects; terrestrial non-insect arthropods

Plant Foods: seeds, grains, and nuts; fruit; nectar; flowers; sap or other plant fluids

Primary Diet: omnivore

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Distribution

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Saguinus nigricollis is found in South America. They are located east of the Andes Mountains in Ecuador, and range west into the upper parts of Peru and Brazil, as well as the southern portion of Colombia (Emmons 1990).

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native )

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Habitat

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Black-mantled tamarins prefer mature forests, as well as dense secondary tropical rainforests. Those living on forest peripheries are found below 913 m.

(Emmons 1990, Nowak 1999, Rowe 1996)

Habitat Regions: tropical ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: forest ; rainforest

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Life Expectancy

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Saguinus nigricollis has an average lifespan of 13.9 years in the wild (Rowe 1996).

Average lifespan
Status: wild:
13.9 years.

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
11.1 years.

Average lifespan
Sex: female
Status: captivity:
15.2 years.

Average lifespan
Status: wild:
10.0 years.

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Morphology

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The head and body length of S. nigricollis is 220 to 226 mm. Tail length ranges between 356 - 361 mm, almost twice the length of its body. And females weigh about 480 g, on average 10 grams more than males. Black-mantled Tamarins have black fur reaching from the head to the middle of the back, where it transitions into a reddish color. The hands, feet, and tail are black. They have hairless ears, and grayish-white hairs surrounding their muzzle. Saguinus nigricollis living west of the Iquitos river differ from those living to the east. West of the Iquitos Black-mantled Tamarins have blackish grizzled olivaceous forequarters while the bottom half is blackish yellow-olivaceous. (Emmons 1990, Rowe 1996)

Average mass: 475 g.

Range length: 220 to 226 mm.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Average mass: 519.2 g.

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Associations

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Tamarins are preyed upon by animals such as raptors, snakes, cats, and even humans. Humans are responsible for depleting the number of surviving Tamarins due to clearing their forest habitat. Tamarins may escape some predation by living in groups where members warn each other of imminent danger. (Nowak 1999, Kinzey 1997)

Known Predators:

  • raptors (Falconiformes and Strigiformes)
  • snakes (Serpentes)
  • domestic cats (Felis silvestris)
  • humans (Homo sapiens)
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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Reproduction

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In the wild only the dominant female of the group breeds during the breeding season. The Genus Saguinus have specialized scent glands in the mid-chest region and in the area around the genitalia. It is thought that reproduction is suppressed in other females due to subordination by the dominant female and pheromones in the scent marks from her circumgenital glands. Dominant females typically have multiple male mating partners, though they may also have only one. (Macdonald 1984, Nowak 1999, Rowe 1996)

Mating System: polyandrous ; cooperative breeder

Saguinus nigricollis has a gestation period of about 140 days, at which time females give birth to twins (78% of births). Birth to one offspring occurs 21% of the time, while three offspring occur 1% of the time. Black-mantled Tamarins give birth year-round and have a birth interval of about 8.4 months. (Macdonald 1984, Nowak 1999, Rowe 1996)

Breeding season: Breeding and births occur year-round.

Range number of offspring: 1 to 3.

Average gestation period: 140 days.

Range weaning age: 4 (low) weeks.

Range age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female): 18 to 24 months.

Range age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male): 18 to 24 months.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; year-round breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; fertilization (Internal ); viviparous

Average birth mass: 43.5 g.

Average gestation period: 140 days.

Average number of offspring: 1.8.

In the genus Saguinus the father, and occasionally other adult group members, help during the birth by receiving and washing the newborn. The helpless young have short hair and cling tightly to the mother or father. The father will hand the young to the mother for feeding time, but then take them back once feeding is finished. This process happens about every 2 to 3 hours and lasts about 30 minutes. After 21 days the infants begin to explore new, nearby areas, but still ride on their parent’s back for about 3 to 4 more weeks. After only 4 weeks the young begin to eat soft food in addition to the milk from their mother. Several members of a Saguinus group will help provide food and care for the infants.

Parental Investment: altricial ; pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Male); pre-independence (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Male); post-independence association with parents; extended period of juvenile learning

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Eggert, H. 2002. "Saguinus nigricollis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Saguinus_nigricollis.html
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Hayley Eggert, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Chris Yahnke, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
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Black-mantled tamarin

provided by wikipedia EN

The black-mantled tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis, is a species of saddle-back tamarin from the northwestern Amazon in far western Brazil, southeastern Colombia, northeastern Peru and eastern Ecuador.[4][5]

There are 3 subspecies:[4][5]

  • Spix's black mantle tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis nigricollis
  • Graells's tamarin or Graells’ black-mantle tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis graellsi
  • Hernandez-Camacho's black-mantle tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis hernandezi

Graells's tamarin was previously considered to be a separate species.[6][7][8]

References

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 135–136. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494.
  2. ^ Rylands AB, Mittermeier RA (2009). "The Diversity of the New World Primates (Platyrrhini)". In Garber PA, Estrada A, Bicca-Marques JC, Heymann EW, Strier KB (eds.). South American Primates: Comparative Perspectives in the Study of Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. Springer. pp. 23–54. ISBN 978-0-387-78704-6.
  3. ^ de la Torre, S.; Heymann, E.W.; Mittermeier, R.A.; Muniz, C.C. (2020). "Leontocebus nigricollis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T39945A17932254. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-3.RLTS.T39945A17932254.en. Retrieved 19 November 2021.
  4. ^ a b Rylands, Anthony B.; Eckhard W. Heymann; Jessica Lynch Alfaro; Janet C. Buckner; Christian Roos; Christian Matauschek; Jean P. Boubli; Ricardo Sampaio; and Russell A. Mittermeier (2016). "Taxonomic Review of the New World Tamarins (Primates: Callitrichidae)" (PDF). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 177 (4): 1003–1028. doi:10.1111/zoj.12386. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 January 2017. Retrieved 19 April 2020.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b Porter, Leila M.; Dacier, Anand; Garber, Paul A. (2016). Rowe, Noel; Myers, Marc (eds.). All the World's Primates. Pogonias Press. pp. 336–337. ISBN 9781940496061.
  6. ^ Matauschek, Christian; Roos, Christian; Heymann, Eckhard W. (2011). "Mitochondrial phylogeny of tamarins (Saguinus, Hoffmannsegg 1807) with taxonomic and biogeographic implications for the S. nigricollis species group". American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 144 (4): 564–574. doi:10.1002/ajpa.21445. PMID 21404233.
  7. ^ Rylands, Mittermeier, Coimbra-Filho, Heymann, de la Torre, Silva Jr., Kierulff, Noronha and Röhe (2008). Marmosets and Tamarins: Pocket Identification Guide. Conservation International. ISBN 978-1-934151-20-4
  8. ^ Defler, T. (2004). Primates of Colombia. Conservation International. ISBN 1-881173-83-6
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Black-mantled tamarin: Brief Summary

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The black-mantled tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis, is a species of saddle-back tamarin from the northwestern Amazon in far western Brazil, southeastern Colombia, northeastern Peru and eastern Ecuador.

There are 3 subspecies:

Spix's black mantle tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis nigricollis Graells's tamarin or Graells’ black-mantle tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis graellsi Hernandez-Camacho's black-mantle tamarin, Leontocebus nigricollis hernandezi

Graells's tamarin was previously considered to be a separate species.

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