dcsimg

Diagnostic Description

provided by Fishbase
This large species is distinguished by the following characters: dorsal surfaces with a dark greenish grey base coloration, variably white spotted, rarely ocellated; different NADH2 gene structure; relatively long tail with mean total length 281% DW, mean anterior cloaca to tail tip 230.2% DW; stinging spines relatively long with mean length of first spine 9.7%DW; teeth plates are in a single row, those in the lower jaw chevron-shaped; pectoral fin radials about 102-116, excluding proterygial radials anterior of eyes; 99-101 total vertebral centra, including synarcual (Ref. 84291).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Estelita Emily Capuli
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Life Cycle

provided by Fishbase
Exhibit ovoviparity (aplacental viviparity), with embryos feeding initially on yolk, then receiving additional nourishment from the mother by indirect absorption of uterine fluid enriched with mucus, fat or protein through specialised structures (Ref. 50449).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Susan M. Luna
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Trophic Strategy

provided by Fishbase
Found in coastal waters (Ref. 45255), including estuarine habitats (Ref. 89467). Feeds on gastropod, bivalve molluscs, crustraceans, worms, octopuses and fishes (Ref. 89467).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Arlene G. Sampang-Reyes
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Biology

provided by Fishbase
Found in coastal waters (Ref. 45255), including estuarine habitats (Ref. 89467). Can grow over 3 m disc width and up to 880 cm total length if the long tail is undamaged (Ref. 30573). Feeds mainly on hard-shelled bottom-dwelling invertebrates such as hermit crabs, whelks, oysters, clams and large molluscs (Ref. 9862, 114953), crustraceans, worms, octopuses and fishes (Ref. 89467). Ovoviviparous (Ref. 50449). Size at maturity for males 100-130 cm WD, females ca. 150-160 cm WD and size at birth highly variable 18 cm to at least 50 cm WD. Females produce litters up to 10 pups, usually 4 or less (Ref. 114953). Common catch of the demersal tangle net, bottom trawl, inshore gillnet and, to a lesser extent, demersal longline fisheries. Utilized for its meat and cartilage (Ref. 58048). Tail used as a decorative item (Ref. 27550). Flesh edible (Ref. 30573).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Susan M. Luna
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Importance

provided by Fishbase
gamefish: yes
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Susan M. Luna
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Aetobatus ocellatus

provided by wikipedia EN

The ocellated eagle ray (Aetobatus ocellatus) or the whitespotted eagle ray, is a species of cartilaginous fish in the eagle ray family Myliobatidae. It is found in the tropical Indo-West Pacific region.[2][3] In the past it was included in the spotted eagle ray (A. narinari), a species restricted to the Atlantic after the split.[4][5][6]

Description and behavior

Compared to the Spotted eagle ray, A. ocellatus has a longer tail (mean total length 281 vs. 263% DW) and a longer stinging spine (mean length 9.7 vs. 8.9% DW). The background coloration of the dorsal surface in A. ocellatus is dark greenish/greying to almost blackish whereas A. narinari is much paler, medium yellowish to brownish.[4] Their foraging range is based on anthropogenic noises with populations structured according to ontogenetic stage.[7]

Reproduction

The ocellated eagle ray exhibits Ovoviviparity with embryos feeding on yolk initially, then receiving additional nutrients from the mother through indirect absorption of enriched uterine fluid.[8] The gestation period lasts over 12 months and only produces a few pups.[9]

Diet

The ocellated eagle ray feeds primarily on gastropod, bivalve molluscs, crustaceans, worms, octopuses and fishes.[10]

References

  1. ^ Kyne, P.M.; Dudgeon, C.L.; Ishihara, H.; Dudley, S.F.J.; White, W.T. (2016). "Aetobatus ocellatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2016: e.T42566169A42566212. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T42566169A42566212.en. Retrieved 19 February 2022.
  2. ^ "Aetobatus ocellatus (Kuhl, 1823)". FishBase. Retrieved 2015-05-17.
  3. ^ Kuhl, H. in van Hasselt, J.C. (1823) Uittreksel uit een’ brief van Dr. J. C. van Hasselt, aan den Heer C. J. Temminck. Algemein Konst- en Letter-bode I Deel (no. 20): 315–317.
  4. ^ a b White, W.T., P.R. Last, G.J.P. Naylor, K. Jensen & J.N. Caira (2010). Clarification of Aetobatus ocellatus (Kuhl, 1823) as a valid species, and a comparison with Aetobatus narinari (Euphrasen, 1790) (Rajiformes: Myliobatidae). Pp. 141–164 in: Last, P.R., White, W.T. & Pogonoski, J.J., eds. (2010). Descriptions of new sharks and rays from Borneo. CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research Paper no. 32.
  5. ^ Richards, V. P.; Henning, M.; Witzell, W.; Shivji, M. S. (2009). "Species Delineation and Evolutionary History of the Globally Distributed Spotted Eagle Ray (Aetobatus narinari)". Journal of Heredity. 100 (3): 273–283. doi:10.1093/jhered/esp005. PMID 19304741.
  6. ^ White, William T. (2014). "A revised generic arrangement for the eagle ray family Myliobatidae, with definitions for the valid genera". Zootaxa. 3860 (2): 149–66. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3860.2.3. PMID 25283197.
  7. ^ Lecchini, David (2018). "Distribution patterns of ocellated eagle rays, Aetobatus ocellatus, along two sites in Moorea Island, French Polynesia". Cybium. 42 (4): 313–320.
  8. ^ Dulvy, Nicholas K.; Reynolds, John D. (1997). "Evolutionary transitions among egg–laying, live–bearing and maternal inputs in sharks and rays". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences. 264 (1386): 1309–1315. Bibcode:1997RSPSB.264.1309D. doi:10.1098/rspb.1997.0181. PMC 1688595.
  9. ^ Schluessel, V (2010). "Diet and reproduction in the white-spotted eagle ray Aetobatus nari- nari from Queensland, australia and the Penghu islands, Taiwan". Mar. Freshw. Res. 61 (11): 1278–1289. doi:10.1071/MF09261.
  10. ^ Randall, J.E. and Cea, A. (2011). Shore fishes of Easter Island. University of Hawai'i Press, 164 p.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Aetobatus ocellatus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The ocellated eagle ray (Aetobatus ocellatus) or the whitespotted eagle ray, is a species of cartilaginous fish in the eagle ray family Myliobatidae. It is found in the tropical Indo-West Pacific region. In the past it was included in the spotted eagle ray (A. narinari), a species restricted to the Atlantic after the split.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN