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Pacific Pink Scallop

Chlamys rubida (Hinds 1845)

Look Alikes

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How to Distinguish from Similar Species: Chlamys hastata is about the same size and shape, but has prominent ruffles or spines on the ribs.
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Habitat

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On rocky or soft bottoms; most common on gravel/mud bottoms.
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Distribution

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Geographical Range: Alaska Peninsula, AK to San Diego, CA; uncommon S of Puget Sound.
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Habitat

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Depth Range: Low intertidal to 300 m; mainly subtidal
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Comprehensive Description

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This scallop has both valves convex, sometimes attaches by byssal threads but does not cement a valve to the rock, has no purple blotch inside the hinge, has 20-30 prominent ribs on each valve but these ribs do not have prominent, rough spines or ruffles. It grows up to about 6 cm long. Anterior hinge wing is usually about 2x longer than the posterior one. When at rest on the bottom, the left valve is usually upright. Left valve exterior is pink, red-purple, white, or yellow; right valve is usually paler.
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Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory
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Comprehensive Description

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Biology/Natural History: This species has a slower growth rate than does Chlamys hastata, and puts less of its energy into reproduction. In southern BC, individuals live about 6 years. These species of scallops have many eyes around the perimeter, which can perceive light and direction but cannot form an image. Predators include the seastars Crossaster papposus and Pycnopodia helianthoides. Swimming is a primary escape response. The sinuous whelk, Buccinum plectrum, may also be a predator since the presence of the whelk elicits a swimming response in the scallop. May be parasitized by Odostomia columbiana, the Clam Sucker snail. This species of scallop is often covered with the symbiotic sponge Myxilla incrustans or Mycale adhaerens. The symbiosis is likely mutualistic. If one of the major predators of the scallop, Evasterias troschelii, encounters the scallop it often turns away if it touches the sponge; likely in response to some secretion or to the spicules from the sponge. The sponge also appears to make it more difficult for the seastar's tube feet to adhere to the scallop. If the sponge is removed from the scallop and the scallop is prevented from swimming, it is readily captured by the seastar. The scallop will also swim from predators of the sponge, such as Archidoris spp, so the sponge is benefited as well. The swimming scallop may also help carry the sponge into areas with clean water and good currents, nd help prevent fouling of the sponge.
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Chlamys rubida

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Chlamys rubida[Note 1] is a species of bivalve mollusc in the family Pectinidae found on the west coast of North America from the Gulf of Alaska to San Diego, California.

Description

The pink scallop has two convex valves joined together by a hinge joint and grows to a diameter of about 6 centimetres (2.4 in). Each valve has an umbo or knoblike protuberance from which 20 to 30 shallow ridges radiate to the margin at the other side of the shell. The left valve is usually uppermost as it lies on the seabed and is some shade of red intermixed with white streaks. The annual growth rings can be seen and there is concentric sculpturing parallel to the margin, often in a different shade of pink. The lower valve is either a paler shade of pink or dull white. There is a large auricle or flap on one side of the umbo. When the animal is feeding, it holds the valves apart and the mantle becomes visible, fringed with short tentacles and with a ring of tiny eyes near the margin of each valve.

The pink scallop can be distinguished from its close relative the spiny scallop (Chlamys hastata) by the valves being rather more rounded and by the lack of spines on the ribs which gives it a smooth texture. The glossy white interior of the shell does not have the purplish markings that are sometimes present in the spiny scallop.[2]

Distribution

The pink scallop is found on the Pacific Coast of North America at depths down to about 300 metres (980 ft). Its range extends from Alaska to San Diego, California but it is more common in the northern half of this range. It is also found in Kamchatka, the Sea of Okhotsk and Japan.[3] It is found on rocks or on sandy or muddy sea beds.[2]

Ecology

The pink scallop usually has a symbiotic relationship with an encrusting sponge, usually the orange Myxilla incrustans, which grows on its left valve. The sponge provides camouflage for the scallop, and may deter predators from attacking it. The sponge also makes it harder for a starfish to pull open the scallop with its tube feet, because it makes manipulating the shell more difficult. The sponge benefits from not being submerged by sediment in turbid conditions. In the laboratory, a study showed that when the sediment in seawater tanks was frequently stirred up, sponges on empty scallop shells all died, whereas those on living shells flourished.[4] When a starfish such as the mottled star (Evasterias troscheli) approaches, the scallop "smells" its presence with chemoreceptors at the tips of its tentacles. It then takes evasive action, repeatedly clapping its valves together and swimming away, margin first. If a starfish succeeds in touching a sponge growing on the shell, it often turns away, apparently repelled by this distasteful coating.[2]

Notes

  1. ^ Also known as the Pacific pink scallop, pink scallop, scooter scallop (for its tendency to "scoot" along the sea floor, and the singing scallop (for the noise it sometimes makes while swimming

References

  1. ^ a b Dijkstra, Henk (2010). "Chlamys rubida (Hinds, 1845)". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2012-05-27.
  2. ^ a b c Cowles, Dave (2005). "Chlamys (Chlamys) rubida (Hinds, 1845)". Walla Walla University. Archived from the original on 2013-04-24. Retrieved 2012-05-27.
  3. ^ "Chlamys rubida (Hinds 1845)". Marine biodiversoty of British Columbia. Archived from the original on 2012-07-07. Retrieved 2012-05-05.
  4. ^ Burns, Duncan O.; Bingham, Brian L. (2002). "Epibiotic sponges on the scallops Chlamys hastata and Chlamys rubida: increased survival in a high sediment environment". Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK. 87 (6): 961–966. doi:10.1017/S0025315402006458. S2CID 44000105.
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Chlamys rubida: Brief Summary

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Chlamys rubida is a species of bivalve mollusc in the family Pectinidae found on the west coast of North America from the Gulf of Alaska to San Diego, California.

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Depth range

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below littoral-upper bathyal
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Dijkstra, Henk [email]
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Dijkstra, Henk [email]