dcsimg

Biology

provided by World Register of Marine Species
zooxanthellate
license
cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> van der Land, J. (ed). (2008). UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms (URMO).
contributor
Jacob van der Land [email]
contributor
Jacob van der Land [email]

Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Coralla are generally leafy, forming large, thick plates. Columns may develop, but these are not like other columnar species of Goniopora which typically have dead basal portions and knob-like living tips, but support live polyps throughout and are tapering. These are uncommon, and they have corallites identical to the usual, plate form (see both b/w photos - second one is a column). Corallites are 2.5 - 3.5 mm diameter, and very shallow, giving a smooth appearance. Found in overhangs and in darkened areas of reef slopes, but commonest on steep slopes in clear and moderately turbid habitats. (Sheppard, 1998 <308>) Colonies are thick or thin encrusting plates with shallow calices forming a smooth surface. Calices are 2.8-4 mm in diameter. Polyps are short and cylindrical with pointed tentacles. They are usually retracted during the day. Colour: usually grey. Abundance: Uncommon, large colonies (which may be over 2 m in diameter) are conspicuous. They are usually found under overhangs. (Veron, 1986 <57>)
license
cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> van der Land, J. (ed). (2008). UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms (URMO).
contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]
contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]