dcsimg
Image of Australian Tree Fern
Creatures » » Plants » » Polypodiopsida »

Short Trunk Tropical Tree Ferns

Dicksoniaceae

Dicksoniaceae

provided by wikipedia EN

Dicksoniaceae is a group of tropical, subtropical and warm temperate ferns, treated as a family in the Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group classification of 2016 (PPG I).[1] Alternatively, the family may be sunk into a very broadly defined family Cyatheaceae sensu lato as the subfamily Dicksonioideae.[2] Most of the genera in the family are terrestrial ferns or have very short trunks compared to tree ferns of the family Cyatheaceae sensu stricto. However, some of the larger species can reach several metres in height. A number of others are epiphytes. They are found mostly in tropical regions in the Southern Hemisphere, as far south as southern New Zealand. Larger tree ferns in the genus Cibotium were formerly included in Dicksoniaceae, but are now segregated as the family Cibotiaceae.

Description

Species in the family are generally characterized by large pinnate fronds, 1–4 m long. The family includes several species of tree ferns, which grow a single trunk, notably the species in Dicksonia. All members of the family have long, tapering hairs composed of cells arranged end to end, unlike the scales characteristic of the Cyatheaceae s.l.

Evolution

The family is thought to have arisen in the Early Cretaceous, based on molecular evidence. Lophosoria is known from fossil spores and leaf fragments from South America dating to the Aptian. The oldest fossil of Dicksonia is known from the Eocene of Antarctica.[3] The widespread Jurassic-Cretaceous herbaceous fern genus Coniopteris has historically been assigned to this family, but cladistic analysis suggests that it is more closely related to the Polypodiales.[4] Relationships of the three living genera, after.[3]

Dicksoniaceae  

Calochlaena

     

Lophosoria

   

Dicksonia

     

Genera

Only three extant genera are recognised in this monophyletic family:[5]

References

  1. ^ PPG I (2016). "A community-derived classification for extant lycophytes and ferns". Journal of Systematics and Evolution. 54 (6): 563–603. doi:10.1111/jse.12229.
  2. ^ Christenhusz, Maarten J.M. & Chase, Mark W. (2014). "Trends and concepts in fern classification". Annals of Botany. 113 (9): 571–594. doi:10.1093/aob/mct299. PMC 3936591. PMID 24532607.
  3. ^ a b Noben, Sarah; Kessler, Michael; Quandt, Dietmar; Weigand, Anna; Wicke, Susann; Krug, Michael; Lehnert, Marcus (2017-07-11). "Biogeography of the Gondwanan tree fern family Dicksoniaceae-A tale of vicariance, dispersal and extinction". Journal of Biogeography. 44 (11): 2648–2659. doi:10.1111/jbi.13056. ISSN 0305-0270.
  4. ^ Li, Chunxiang; Miao, Xinyuan; Zhang, Li-Bing; Ma, Junye; Hao, Jiasheng (January 2020). "Re-evaluation of the systematic position of the Jurassic–Early Cretaceous fern genus Coniopteris". Cretaceous Research. 105: 104136. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2019.04.007. S2CID 146355798.
  5. ^ Hassler, Michael & Schmitt, Bernd (November 2019). "Dicksoniaceae". Checklist of Ferns and Lycophytes of the World. 8.11. Retrieved 2019-11-25.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Dicksoniaceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Dicksoniaceae is a group of tropical, subtropical and warm temperate ferns, treated as a family in the Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group classification of 2016 (PPG I). Alternatively, the family may be sunk into a very broadly defined family Cyatheaceae sensu lato as the subfamily Dicksonioideae. Most of the genera in the family are terrestrial ferns or have very short trunks compared to tree ferns of the family Cyatheaceae sensu stricto. However, some of the larger species can reach several metres in height. A number of others are epiphytes. They are found mostly in tropical regions in the Southern Hemisphere, as far south as southern New Zealand. Larger tree ferns in the genus Cibotium were formerly included in Dicksoniaceae, but are now segregated as the family Cibotiaceae.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Dicksoniaceae

provided by wikipedia FR

Les Dicksoniaceae forment une famille de fougères arborescentes des régions tropicales, subtropicales et tempérées. Les espèces de cette famille sont généralement considérées comme plus primitives que celle de la famille des Cyatheaceae. Plusieurs taxons datant du début du Jurassique sont connus.

La plupart des espèces de cette famille ont un tronc plus court que celles de la famille des Cyatheaceae. Toutefois, les plus grandes espèces peuvent atteindre plusieurs mètres de hauteur. Un certain nombre d'autres sont épiphytes. On les trouve principalement dans les régions tropicales de l'hémisphère Sud, jusqu'au sud de la Nouvelle-Zélande.

Ces espèces se caractérisent par une fronde de 1 à 4 m de long. Le tronc est unique pour la plupart des espèces comme celle du genre Dicksonia. Tous les membres disposent de sorte de poils, contrairement aux Cyatheaceae qui disposent de sortes d'écailles.

Dénomination et systématique

Taxonomie

Le nom de la famille est issue du nom du genre Dicksonia, nommé en l'honneur de James Dickson, est un botaniste et pépiniériste.

Systématique

Trois genres sont reconnus dans cette famille monophylétique :

Certains auteurs y placent le genre Cibotium [1],[2]. Cependant, d'autres le rangent dans la famille des Cibotiaceae.

On y accepte également plusieurs genres fossiles :

Voir aussi

Références taxonomiques

Notes et références

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Dicksoniaceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Les Dicksoniaceae forment une famille de fougères arborescentes des régions tropicales, subtropicales et tempérées. Les espèces de cette famille sont généralement considérées comme plus primitives que celle de la famille des Cyatheaceae. Plusieurs taxons datant du début du Jurassique sont connus.

La plupart des espèces de cette famille ont un tronc plus court que celles de la famille des Cyatheaceae. Toutefois, les plus grandes espèces peuvent atteindre plusieurs mètres de hauteur. Un certain nombre d'autres sont épiphytes. On les trouve principalement dans les régions tropicales de l'hémisphère Sud, jusqu'au sud de la Nouvelle-Zélande.

Ces espèces se caractérisent par une fronde de 1 à 4 m de long. Le tronc est unique pour la plupart des espèces comme celle du genre Dicksonia. Tous les membres disposent de sorte de poils, contrairement aux Cyatheaceae qui disposent de sortes d'écailles.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

딕소니아과

provided by wikipedia 한국어 위키백과

딕소니아과(Dicksoniaceae)는 양치식물강 나무고사리목에 속하는 양치식물 과의 하나이다. 열대와 아열대 그리고 온대 기후 지역에 분포하는 양치류이다. 주로 남반구의 열대 기후 지역, 뉴질랜드와 같은 먼 남쪽에서도 발견된다.

하위 속

  • Calochlaena
  • Dicksonia
  • Lophosoria
  • Conantiopteris
  • Coniopteris
  • Erboracia
  • Lophosoriorhachis
  • Nishidicaulis
  • Onychiopsis'

계통 분류

아래의 분기도는 나무고사리목에 속하는 과들의 계통발생학적 관계를 보여주고 있다.[1][2][3]

나무고사리목    

티르솝테리스과

     

록소마과

     

쿨키타과

   

꿩고사리과

           

나무고사리과

     

키보티움과

     

딕소니아과

   

메탁시아과

           

고사리목

   

각주

  1. P. Koral et al. 2006 Petra Korall, Kathleen M. Pryer, Jordan S. Metzgar, Harald Schneider, David S. Conant: "Tree ferns: Monophyletic groups and their relationships as revealed by four protein-coding plastid loci." Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 39 (2006) 830–845
  2. S. Lehtonen 2011 Samuli Lehtonen: "Towards Resolving the Complete Fern Tree of Life" PLoS ONE 6(10): e24851. doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0024851 (13 Oct 2011)
  3. P. Koral et al. 2007 Petra Korall, David S. Conant, Jordan S. Metzgar, Harald Schneider, Kathleen M. Pryer: "A Molecular phylogeny of scaly tree ferns (Cyatheaceae)." American Journal of Botany 94(5): (2007) 873–886
 title=
license
ko
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/