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Dent's Horseshoe Bat Dent's Horseshoe Bat

Rhinolophus denti Thomas 1904

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Rhinolophus swinnyi may be best recognized as a part of Rhinolophus denti.

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Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
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Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Behavior

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Dent's horseshoe bats have a superb sense of hearing and good eyesight similar to other species in the family. The large fleshy pad around the nose of the animal helps to amplify the ultrasonic calls it emits for echolocation. Echolocation allows them to navigate in total darkness, as well as find and capture insect prey at night. Like other mammals, it is also possible that chemical cues and tactile cues play a role in social communication.

Communication Channels: acoustic

Perception Channels: visual ; tactile ; ultrasound ; echolocation ; chemical

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Conservation Status

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Rhinolophus denti is considered least concern on the IUCN red list. Roosts may be persecuted sometimes, but populations are considered large and widespread, although patchily distributed, currently.

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

State of Michigan List: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Benefits

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There are no known adverse effects of Dent's horseshoe bats on humans.

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Benefits

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Dent's horseshoe bats are important members of native ecosystems. Their predation on flying insects can impact agricultural pest populations, providing a benefit to farmers.

Positive Impacts: controls pest population

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Associations

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Dent's horseshoe bats are important predators of insects in their native ecosystems.

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Trophic Strategy

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Dent's horseshoe bats are nocturnal insectivores, feeding on a variety of small, soft-bodied insects. Insect populations are relatively scarce in the arid habitats these bats occupy and more research is needed to understand their foraging strategies.

Animal Foods: insects

Primary Diet: carnivore (Insectivore )

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Distribution

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Rhinolophus denti is found in arid savanna regions of western and southern Africa. In West Africa they range from southeastern Senegal to northeastern Ghana. In southern Africa they are found primarily in Namibia, Botswana, and northwestern South Africa. A subspecies, R. d. knorri, is found only in Guinea and has an average forearm length of only 37.5 to 40.5 mm. Populations seem to be patchily distributed and western and southern populations seem to be disjunct, although this may reflect insufficient sampling.

Biogeographic Regions: ethiopian (Native )

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
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Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Habitat

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Dent's horseshoe bats prefer arid savanna climates and roost in caves and cave-like structures, such as abandoned mine shafts and hollow trees. In winter, when the temperature drops below 11 degrees Celsius, they conserve energy by entering hibernation deep inside of caves.

Habitat Regions: temperate ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland

Other Habitat Features: caves

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Life Expectancy

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There is no available information on longevity in Dent's horseshoe bats. Other small Rhinolophus species can live up to 20 years old.

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Morphology

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Rhinolophus denti is one of the smallest species in the Rhinolophidae family, with an average weight of 6 grams. Their average total length is 70 millimeters with a forearm length between 41 and 43 millimeters. Their fur is long and soft. The color of their fur tends to be light brown or grey on the upper part of their body, with an off white or cream color at the base. The wings are brown with white edges.

Average mass: 6 g.

Range length: 4.3 to 5.7 mm.

Average wingspan: 70 mm.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; heterothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Sexual Dimorphism: sexes alike

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bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Associations

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There are no specific reports of predation on Dent's horseshoe bats. In general, bats are preyed on by owls and other raptors in flight and by scansorial predators in their roosts. Like other bats, Dent's horseshoe bats use their cryptic coloration, nocturnal activity, and difficult to access roosts to escape much predation.

Anti-predator Adaptations: cryptic

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The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
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Reproduction

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Nothing is truly known about reproduction in Dent's horseshoe bats. However, they may be similar to other species of Rhinolophus, in which males mate with as many females as possible during hibernation.

There is little reported information on reproduction, however, Dent's horseshoe bats may be similar to closely related Rhinolophus species. In Rhinolophus females generally have a single offspring yearly and temperate species tend to reproduce seasonally. Many temperate species experience delayed implantation. They breed once a year and young are thought to be independent at about 2 months old.

Breeding interval: Rhinolophus denti breeds once yearly.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average time to independence: 2 months.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; viviparous

Little is known about parental investment in this species. However, like other Rhinolophus species, mothers give birth to live young and nurse and carry them until they are able to fly, usually after approximately two months.

Parental Investment: altricial ; pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female)

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The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Strzelec, J. 2009. "Rhinolophus denti" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Rhinolophus_denti.html
author
Jared Strzelec, University of Oregon
editor
Stephen Frost, University of Oregon
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Dent's horseshoe bat

provided by wikipedia EN

Dent's horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus denti) is a species of bat in the family Rhinolophidae. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The bat's natural habitats are dry savannah country and it roosts in caves and other subterranean habitats.

Description

Dent's horseshoe bat is a small species measuring about 7 cm (2.8 in) in length and weighing 6 g (0.2 oz). The fur is long and silky, light brown or grey on the upper parts and paler underneath. The wings are brown with white margins.[2]

Ecology

Dent's horseshoe bat is a colonial species which roosts in groups varying from a few individuals to over a hundred. The roosts are usually in cool, humid caves. The bats have the ability to enter a state of torpor under certain environmental conditions. The bats are insectivorous, feeding on a variety of soft-bodied insects caught on the wing at night. Little is known of the breeding habits of this bat, but they are likely to be similar to those of other Rhinolophus species, with a single offspring becoming independent about two months after it is born.[2]

Status

Dent's horseshoe bat has two distinct populations separated by a gap of hundreds of kilometres. One is in West Africa, in Senegal, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau and Ghana, the other in southern Africa; southern Angola, Namibia, western Botswana, western Zimbabwe and northern South Africa. It may well be more abundant than is presently apparent, but currently, fewer than a hundred colonies are known from West Africa and fewer than two hundred from Southern Africa. The population trend for this bat is unknown, but it faces no particular threats other than the possible disturbance of its roosting sites, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has rated its conservation status as being of "least concern".[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Monadjem, A.; Griffin, M.; Cotterill, F.P.D.; Jacobs, D.; Taylor, P.J. (2017). "Rhinolophus denti". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2017: e.T19538A21979433. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-2.RLTS.T19538A21979433.en. Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b Strzelec, J. (2009). "Rhinolophus denti". Animal Diversity Web. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
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Dent's horseshoe bat: Brief Summary

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Dent's horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus denti) is a species of bat in the family Rhinolophidae. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The bat's natural habitats are dry savannah country and it roosts in caves and other subterranean habitats.

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