dcsimg

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

provided by AnAge articles
Maximum longevity: 15.4 years (captivity) Observations: Three animals aged 15.4 years where still alive in captivity (Richard Weigl 2005).
license
cc-by-3.0
copyright
Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
editor
de Magalhaes, J. P.
partner site
AnAge articles

Untitled

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The duiker has lived up to 14 years in captivity (Nowak 1991). Pythons have been found dead after being punctured by the duiker's horns during digestion (Kingdon 1982).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This species is rated to be at "Lower Risk" by the IUCN.

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Duikers dig up and eat potatoes, peanuts, and other crops in agricultural fields (Estes 1991).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

In certain African cultures, the horn is used to make pendants that are thought to ward off evil spirits (Kingdon 1982).

Positive Impacts: food

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Trophic Strategy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Duikers have been known to eat a wide variety of foods. They generally eat leaves and shoots from bushes, as well as fruits and flowers that drop to the ground due to the feeding of birds, monkeys, and fruit bats in trees. Duikers dig up roots, tubers, and bulbs with their hooves. The resin and bark of trees are occasionally a part of the duiker's diet. They have been known to eat insects, such as caterpillars, cockroaches, and ants. In uncommon instances, duikers have been seen stalking and eating lizards, frogs, rodents, and birds. Water requirements are met from moisture in the vegetation they consume. (Estes 1991, Kingdon 1982)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Distribution

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The gray or common duiker is found in the Sub-Saharan region of Africa from Senegal to Ethiopia. It also ranges from Eastern Africa to the southernmost tip of Africa (Nowak 1991).

Biogeographic Regions: ethiopian (Native )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Habitat

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This speices of duiker is found in areas of central, eastern, and southern Africa which provide sufficient amounts of cover. They inhabit savannas, grasslands, and woodlands. They also live in mountainous regions and are found at higher altitudes than any other African ungulates. They are not found in deserts or densely wooded areas such as the rainforests.

Habitat Regions: tropical ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; forest ; scrub forest ; mountains

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Expectancy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
14.3 years.

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
12.0 years.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The average weights, coloration, and ear size of the gray or common duiker vary with geographic location. Females generally weigh 2-4 kg more than males in a given region. On average, they are 60 cm in height at the shoulder and are 100 cm in length. Males have horns, which are spikes 7-18 cm and are heavily grooved at the base. Females usually do not have horns, but occasionally they may have stunted horns. Ears are 9.5-14.5 cm in length. Longer ears are found on duikers in open, arid habitats. Coloration varies from pale, light colored animals in dry regions, to dark gray colored in moist habitats. Mountain dwelling duikers have longer, thicker coats than duikers living in savannas, forests, and grasslands.

Range mass: 12 to 25 kg.

Average length: 100 cm.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; homoiothermic; bilateral symmetry

Sexual Dimorphism: female larger; ornamentation

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The male and female form a monogamous breeding pair. There is no evidence of a peak breeding period (Estes 1991). Female duikers are known to give birth during all months of the year, and gestation is estimated to last 4-7 months (Kingdon 1982). Females find very secluded, thick cover to give birth. Normally only one young is born, but sometimes there are two. They are defended by both the male and female. The young reach adult size in 6 months and attain sexual maturity in 8-9 months (Nowak 1991).

Range number of offspring: 1 to 2.

Range gestation period: 4.1 to 5.67 months.

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

Average birth mass: 1612 g.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male)
Sex: male:
255 days.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female)
Sex: female:
255 days.

Parental Investment: altricial

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Cooper, A. 2000. "Sylvicapra grimmia" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sylvicapra_grimmia.html
author
Arthur Cooper, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Phil Myers, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Common duiker

provided by wikipedia EN

The common duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia), also known as the grey or bush duiker, is a small antelope found everywhere in Africa south of the Sahara, excluding the Horn of Africa and the rainforests of the central and western parts of the continent. Generally, they are found in habitats with sufficient vegetation cover to allow them to hide—savanna and hilly areas, including the fringes of human settlements.

Description

Colouration of this species varies widely over its vast geographic range. There are 14 subspecies described,[1] ranging from chestnut in forested areas of Angola to grizzled gray in northern savannas and light brown shades in arid regions. It grows to about 50 cm (20 in) in height and generally weighs 12 to 25 kg (26 to 55 lb); although females are generally larger and heavier than the males. Only the male has horns and these can grow to 11 cm (4.3 in) long.

Behavior

Breeding is year round and the female gives birth to one fawn after a gestation period of 6 to 7.5 months. The common duiker has a wide diet; beyond herbivorous browsing for leaves, flowers, fruits and tubers, they will also eat insects, frogs, small birds and mammals, and even carrion. As long as they have vegetation to eat (from which they get some water), they can go without drinking for very long periods. In the rainy season, they will frequently not drink water at all, instead obtaining fluids from fruits. They will often scavenge for these fruits below trees in which monkeys are feeding. They are active both day and night, but become more nocturnal near human settlements.

Males are territorial and smear gland secretions on rocks and branches to mark their territories; their preferred resting places are generally on elevated ground, where they can observe their territory. Females, by contrast, prefer deeper cover. The overall success of this species stems from its ability to inhabit a wide variety of habitats, as well as from its adaptable, generalist diet.

Gallery

Notes

  1. ^ a b IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group (2016). "Sylvicapra grimmia". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2016: e.T21203A50194717. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T21203A50194717.en. Retrieved 19 November 2021.

References

  • Animal. Smithsonian Institution, 2005, pg. 250
  • Alden, P. C., et al. Collins Guide to African Wildlife. Harper Collins, 2004.
  • Clutton-Brock, J., ed. Dorling Kindersley Mammal Handbook. Dorling Kindersley Limited, 2002.
  • Briggs, P. East African Wildlife. Bradt Travel Guides Limited, 2007.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Common duiker: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The common duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia), also known as the grey or bush duiker, is a small antelope found everywhere in Africa south of the Sahara, excluding the Horn of Africa and the rainforests of the central and western parts of the continent. Generally, they are found in habitats with sufficient vegetation cover to allow them to hide—savanna and hilly areas, including the fringes of human settlements.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN