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Ileodictyon cibarium

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Ileodictyon cibarium is a saprobic species of fungus in the family Phallaceae. It is found in Australia,[1] New Zealand and South Africa, where it commonly known as the basket fungus or the white basket fungus, alluding to the fruiting bodies, that are shaped like a round or oval ball with interlaced or latticed branches. Although the immature volvae are edible, the mature fruit body is foul-smelling and covered with a slime layer containing spores on the inner surfaces.

The Māori people had 35 different names referring to I. cibarium. These included tutae kehua ("ghost droppings"), tūtae whatitiri, and whareatua ("house of the devil"), kōkirikiriwhetū, kōpurawhetū, korokorowhetū, wheterau, popowhaitiri, tikowhatitiri, paruwhatitiri, matakupenga, and tūtae whetū. Several of the names refer to Whaitiri, the atua and personification of thunder, this is because of I. cibarium fruiting bodies' appearances following thunderstorms.[2][3]

In a 2018 poll, I. cibarium was ranked second by Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research for its pick as New Zealand's national fungus, being defeated by Entoloma hochstetteri.[4]

Description

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Basket fungus mature fruit body, showing covering of green/brown slime containing spores

Prior to the opening of the volva, the fruit body is egg-shaped, and white to grayish in color. After opening, it is a whitish ball of meshes.

Habitat

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Cross section of the unopened fruiting body of the New Zealand basket fungus (Ileodictyon cibarium), next to a ballpoint pen

I. cibarium grows alone or clustered together near woody debris, in lawns, gardens, and cultivated soil.

Edibility

The immature volvae are edible but unappealing. Consuming the gleba and the white basket portion of the fungus have been known to lead to sickness.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Ileodictyon cibarium". Atlas of Living Australia. Retrieved 2017-06-16.
  2. ^ "tūtae whetū - Māori Dictionary". maoridictionary.co.nz. Retrieved 27 July 2021.
  3. ^ Pallante, Joseph (19 July 2020). "The Alienness of White Basket Fungus". NZFungi. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  4. ^ "New Zealand's favourite fungus has been revealed". RNZ. 8 June 2018. Retrieved 27 July 2021.
  5. ^ Glynn, Angela Prain, Lizzy. "Ghost Droppings". Raglan Area School Community. Retrieved 27 July 2021.

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Ileodictyon cibarium: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ileodictyon cibarium is a saprobic species of fungus in the family Phallaceae. It is found in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, where it commonly known as the basket fungus or the white basket fungus, alluding to the fruiting bodies, that are shaped like a round or oval ball with interlaced or latticed branches. Although the immature volvae are edible, the mature fruit body is foul-smelling and covered with a slime layer containing spores on the inner surfaces.

The Māori people had 35 different names referring to I. cibarium. These included tutae kehua ("ghost droppings"), tūtae whatitiri, and whareatua ("house of the devil"), kōkirikiriwhetū, kōpurawhetū, korokorowhetū, wheterau, popowhaitiri, tikowhatitiri, paruwhatitiri, matakupenga, and tūtae whetū. Several of the names refer to Whaitiri, the atua and personification of thunder, this is because of I. cibarium fruiting bodies' appearances following thunderstorms.

In a 2018 poll, I. cibarium was ranked second by Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research for its pick as New Zealand's national fungus, being defeated by Entoloma hochstetteri.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN