dcsimg

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Phyciodes tharos is a small to medium sized butterfly that is 16-18 mm in length, with a wingspan of 3-4 cm. There are characteristic traits that differentiate males from females. Female wing coloration is generally darker than in males, with paler median spots. Males have black antennal knobs, which females lack altogether. The butterfly's coloration is black and vibrant orange, but the markings can vary geographically and can change from season to season. Spring butterflies tend to be darker than summer generations and have grey mottled hindwings. Typically, the upperside of the wings are brighter orange with marks on the forewings. The underside of the hindwings are an unmarked orange-brown to gray-brown, with a white cresent along the outer margin. Eggs are green. Larvae are chocolate brown, have a white mid-dorsal line, and are covered with tiny white dots. As larvae develop, caterpillars turn black and gain yellow bands on thier sides and spots along their back. The caterpillar also has eight rows of brown-yellow spines.

Range length: 16 to 18 mm.

Range wingspan: 3 to 4 cm.

Other Physical Features: ectothermic ; heterothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Sexual Dimorphism: sexes colored or patterned differently; sexes shaped differently

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Habitat

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The pearl crescent prefers open, moist, and sunny places. It is commonly found along roadsides, fields and meadows, open pine forests, and vacant lots.

Habitat Regions: temperate

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; forest

Other Habitat Features: agricultural

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Distribution

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The pearl crescent butterfly ranges from Alberta, Canada down south along the east coast of the United States into Mexico. It has also been seen in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, southeastern California, and Mexico. This species is not found in the Pacific Northwest.

Biogeographic Regions: nearctic (Native )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Trophic Strategy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The adult uses a siphoning technique to feed on nectar from an array of flowers including dogbane, swamp milkweed, shepherd's needle, asters, black-eyed susans, thistle, gloriosa daisies, white clover, and winter cress. The butterfly siphons nectar out of the flower by using its coiled tongue (proboscis). Caterpillars have chewing mouthparts used to eat leaves and other materials off of plants.

Plant Foods: leaves; nectar; flowers

Primary Diet: herbivore (Folivore , Nectarivore )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This species of butterfly has no known economic importance.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This butterfly has little economic significance, although larvae can be a nuisance, eating the leaves off of their host plants.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Cycle

provided by Animal Diversity Web

As larvae develop, caterpillars turn black and gain yellow bands on thier sides and spots along their back.

Development - Life Cycle: metamorphosis

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The pearl crescent butterfly is in no danger of extinction, although it may be rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

State of Michigan List: no special status

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Untitled

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The pearl crescent is one the most common of 700 species of butterflies in the United States and Canada. Many subspecies of Phyciodes tharos have been identified. Phyciodes tharos arctica, found in Newfoundland, has a deeper more orange and yellow underside. Phyciodes tharos tharos, a subspecies found in New York, is lighter than the subspecies found in Newfoundland. Other subspecies found in Colorado and Washington are Phyciodes tharos morpheus and << Phyciodes campestris>>. Similar species to P. tharos are the Silvery Checkerspot and Phaon Crescent.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

During courtship, the male pursues the female butterfly while he is patroling the host plant. If the female is flying, she lands, keeping her wings spread. Next, the male lands behind her, possibly displaying his wings and on occasion fluttering them. With his wings partially opened he crawls under her hindwings to mate. For highly receptive females, which are usually motionless, the male rarely displays or flutters before mating. On the other hand, an unreceptive female will close her wings, possibly causing the male to leave. If the male doesn't fly away, the female may raise her abdomen (so he cannot join), turn and crawl away, drop down into vegetation, or fly away to escape.

Females lay eggs in masses of 20-200 (average 36), sometimes two or three layers deep on the underside leaves of a host plant (usually aster leaves).

Range eggs per season: 20 to 200.

Average eggs per season: 36.

Key Reproductive Features: semelparous ; sexual ; fertilization (Internal ); oviparous

After oviposition, there is no further parental involvement.

Parental Investment: pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
King, J. 2001. "Phyciodes tharos" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyciodes_tharos.html
author
Jamie King, Southwestern University
editor
Stephanie Fabritius, Southwestern University
editor
Sara Diamond, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

provided by North American Butterfly Knowledge Network
Phyciodes tharos is resident in the eastern and southern United States, as far north as Alberta and south to southern Mexico and Bimini (Scott 1986). Habitats are moist meadows, moist fields, moist prairie and streamsides. Host plants are herbaceous and largely restricted to one genus, Aster (Compositae). Eggs are laid on the host plant in clusters with between 20-300 (average 63) eggs per clutch. Individuals overwinter as X. There is a variable number of flights each year depending on latitude with multiple flights all year in the south, and two flights in the far northern part of the range with approximate flight times late May-Aug30 (Scott 1986).
license
cc-by-3.0
copyright
Leslie Ries
author
Leslie Ries

Conservation Status

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Not of concern
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Cyclicity

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Double brooded in Alberta, flying primarily in June and again in August.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Distribution

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Occurs throughout eastern North America, north to southern Ontario and southern Alberta (Scott 1986).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

General Description

provided by University of Alberta Museums
"The crescents form a complex group of poorly understood species, partly as a result of the fact that they are often very similar in appearance. Extensive genetic research by Wahlberg et al. (2003) has not clarified the species relationships. Males of the Pearl Crescent have more extensive upperside black markings (the black forewing median line is usually continuous not broken) comapred to the Northern Crescent (P. cocyta), and the hindwing marginal pale yellow crescents are more prominent, resulting in a broken rather than a solid black margin. Compared to batesii, tharos has less black on the upperside, and the tip of the antennal club is black, white and orange, not black and white as in batesii. This character is not relaible for separating females of these species. Tharos females generally have a more distinclty marked underside than either cocyta or batesii females. Female crescents have more black markings on the upperside and paler orange spots in addition to the orange ground colour; they are best identified by association with males from the same population. Subspecies orantain, recently named by Scott (1998), describes our populations."
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Habitat

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Grasslands and dry meadows of the prairie and parkland regions.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Life Cycle

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Scott (1998, 1994) gives detailed descriptions of the immatures. The pale green eggs are laid in clusters, and the larvae are dark brown, spiny and feed on leaf undersides. Partially grown (fourth instar) larvae hibernate (Scott 1998). Young larvae feed during the day, while older ones appear to be strictly nocturnal, resting in plant litter below the host during the day (Scott 1998).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Trophic Strategy

provided by University of Alberta Museums
The larval hosts are not known in Alberta. Larvae feed on asters (Aster spp.) in the west-central US (Scott 1998) and also in Manitoba (Klassen et al. 1989).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Phyciodes tharos ( German )

provided by wikipedia DE

Phyciodes tharos ist ein Schmetterling aus der Familie der Edelfalter (Nymphalidae).

Merkmale

Falter

Die Flügelspannweite beträgt 30 bis 35 Millimeter. Die Länge der Vorderflügel beträgt 14 bis 16 Millimeter bei den Männchen, bei den Weibchen 16 bis 18 Millimeter. Die Oberseite der Flügel ist orange und dick schwarz gesäumt. Schwarze Abzeichen wie Äderungen, Flecken und Punkte ziehen sich über die Flügel. Die Unterseite der Flügel ist gelblich weiß und besitzt eine braune Äderung. Auf den Vorderflügeln befinden sich zwei deutliche braune Flecken, während auf dem Hinterflügel ein heller sichelförmiger Fleck erkennbar ist. Weibchen sind im Allgemeinen dunkler gefärbt als Männchen. Die Spitzen der Fühler sind schwarz-weiß, vor allem in ihrem südlicheren Verbreitungsgebiet weiter westlich sowie nördlich ändert sich dies in ein Orange-Schwarz wie bei Phyciodes morpheus. Im frühen Frühjahr sowie im Spätherbst tritt eine Variante der Art auf, die bräunlich gefärbt ist. Dies rührt von weniger Licht in ihrem Larvenstadium kurz vor ihrer Diapause her.

Ei

Die Eier sind grün und werden in Gruppen von 20 bis 300 auf der Unterseite der Blätter der Wirtspflanze abgelegt. Pro Weibchen können bis zu 700 Eier gelegt werden.

Raupe

Der Körper der Raupen ist dunkelbraun und mit kleinen weißen Punkten bedeckt. In der Mitte des Rückens verläuft eine schwarze Linie und an dessen Seiten jeweils eine cremefarbene mit schwarzen Strichen. Seitlich verlaufen cremefarbene Bänder, die schwarz eingefasst sind und eine geschwungene Linie aus weißen Punkten darüber aufweisen. Die stark verzweigten braunen Stacheln sind oft weißlich getüpfelt. Der Kopf ist schwarz mit einem cremefarbenen Dreieck sowie halbmondförmigen ebenso gefärbten Abzeichen um die Augen und einem Strich oder manchmal auch Punkt auf der Stirn.

 src=
Raupe

Puppe

Die Puppe ist cremefarben, manchmal gelblich-braun gefärbt und in der Regel oranger als bei Phyciodes morpheus. Über ihren Rücken verläuft ein querer bräunlicher Streifen bis zum Bauch, welcher seitlich ein cremefarbenes Band aufweist. Die Flügel sind gelb-braun. Von der Form ähnelt die Puppe eher der von Phyciodes morpheus als von Phyciodes batesii, welche mehr Kanten besitzt.

Ähnliche Arten

  • Phyciodes morpheus, weniger orange mit mehr schwarzen Bereichen auf der Flügeloberseite. Die Fühlerspitzen sind orange-schwarz gefärbt und die Art ist größer als P. tharos und tritt weiter südlich auf.
  • Phyciodes cocyta, mit größeren orangen Bereichen auf der Oberseite der Hinterflügel.[1]
  • Phyciodes batesii, wesentlich dunkler und mit einem leichten Schachbrettmuster. Männchen zeigen ein helles oranges Band auf der Oberseite der Vorderflügel.[1]

Verhalten und Lebensweise

Die Falter lassen sich auf Wiesen mit der Nahrungspflanze gerne nieder. Hier trifft man dann teilweise hunderte der Exemplare an. Sie fliegen in mehreren Generationen. Im Süden Texas und im Süden Floridas sind es drei bis vier von April bis Oktober. In Virginia und in New York bis zu den Ebenen Colorados von Mai bis September und in Saskatchewan sind es zwei Generationen von Mai bis August, wobei er weiter nördlich in den südlichen Teilen der kanadischen Bundesstaaten eher erst Anfang Juni mit der Flugzeit beginnt.[1] Adulte Falter sind sehr ortstreu. Sie nehmen Nektar von einer großen Vielzahl von Blumen auf z. B. Hundsgiftgewächsen (Apocynaceae), Seidenpflanzengewächsen (Asclepiadoideae), Venuskamm (Scandix pecten-veneris), Astern (Aster) und Winterkresse (Barbarea vulgaris).[2] Sie sind aber auch an Schlammpfützen zu sehen, wo sie Mineralien aufnehmen. Männchen patrouillieren den ganzen Tag durch ihr Territorium in der Nähe der Wirtspflanze auf der Suche nach Weibchen. Hierbei bevorzugen sie Täler. Sie hybridisieren mit Phyciodes morpheus, was auch lebensfähige Nachkommen erzeugt. P. tharos tharos und P. tharos morpheus werden in Colorado als Unterarten angesehen. In West Virginia und Virginia bis Pennsylvania gelten sie als eigene Art.

Das Männchen umwirbt das Weibchen, indem es diesem hinterherfliegt und zur Landung veranlasst. Wenn die Weibchen gelandet sind, nähert sich das Männchen von der Hinterseite, während das Weibchen die Flügel spreizt. Nun beginnt eine Art Balztanz, indem das Männchen mit den Flügeln flattert und zur Schau stellt. Mit leicht geöffneten Flügeln kriecht das Männchen zur Paarung dann unter die Hinterflügel des Weibchens. Zur Paarung bereite Weibchen sitzen währenddessen regungslos da. Sind sie nicht paarungsbereit, flattern sie mit den gespreizten Flügeln, um das Männchen zu vertreiben, oder heben ihren Bauch an, um die Paarung unmöglich zu machen. Es wurde auch schon beobachtet, wie sie sich winden oder einfach in die Vegetation fallen lassen. Manchmal fliehen sie auch anderweitig, um den Annäherungsversuchen der Männchen zu entkommen.

Die Raupen fressen verschiedene Arten von Astern (Aster). Es wird angenommen, dass sie auch vom Gelben Kronbart (Verbesina helianthoides) fressen, dies ist aber noch zweifelhaft. Bei Zuchten nahmen sie aber auch Korbblütler wie Erigeron peregrinus. In ihrem jungen Raupenstadium sind sie gesellig und befressen die Blätter ausschließlich von der Unterseite. Im dritten Stadium überwintert die Raupe.

Verbreitung und Lebensraum

Die Art bewohnt Nordamerika von der gemäßigten Zone Kanadas wie dem Südosten Albertas, dem östlichen und südöstlichen Ontario, der Insel Manitoulin, Québec und dem Riding-Mountain-Nationalpark in Manitoba[1] sowie allen Bundesstaaten im Osten der Vereinigten Staaten über den Süden Montanas, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona bis ins südöstliche Kalifornien und zu den subtropischen Bereichen des südlichen Mexikos.[2]

Bewohnt werden hier Feucht- und Trockenwiesen, Prärie, Wald- und Wegränder sowie Gärten und Flussufer. Sie ist auch häufig in Kiefernwäldern anzutreffen.[2]

Unterarten

Im ITIS-Report werden Neben der Nominatform noch zwei weitere Unterarten unterschieden:[3]

  • Phyciodes tharos tharos, (Drury, 1773) – New York. Ist allgemein heller gefärbt.[4]
  • Phyciodes tharos riocolorado, Scott, 1992
  • Phyciodes tharos orantain, Scott, 1998

Es werden noch weitere Unterarten unterschieden.

  • Phyciodes tharos arctica (dos Passos, 1935) – Neufundland. Hat eine orangere Färbung sowie gelbe Flügelunterseiten.[4][5]
  • Phyciodes tharos morpheus – Colorado, Washington.[4]

Status

Die Art ist weit verbreitet und häufig. In manchen Teilen, vor allem an den Rändern ihres Verbreitungsgebietes, kann die Art selten sein.[2]

Quellen

Literatur

  • Elizabeth Balmer: Schmetterlinge: Erkennen und Bestimmen. Parragon Books, 2007, ISBN 9781407512037, S. 123
  • James A. Scott: The Butterflies of North America: A Natural History and Field Guide. Stanford University Press, Stanford 1992, ISBN 978-0804720137, S. 311–312

Einzelnachweise

  1. a b c d Butterflies of Canada, englisch, abgerufen am 17. Februar 2015
  2. a b c d Butterflies and Moth of North America, englisch, abgerufen am 17. Februar 2015
  3. ITIS-Report, englisch, abgerufen am 29. Dezember 2014
  4. a b c BioKids, englisch, abgerufen am 17. Februar 2015
  5. ITIS-Report, Phyciodes tharos arctica, englisch, abgerufen am 17. Februar 2015

Weblinks

 src=
– Sammlung von Bildern, Videos und Audiodateien
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Autoren und Herausgeber von Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia DE

Phyciodes tharos: Brief Summary ( German )

provided by wikipedia DE

Phyciodes tharos ist ein Schmetterling aus der Familie der Edelfalter (Nymphalidae).

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Autoren und Herausgeber von Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia DE

Pearl crescent

provided by wikipedia EN

The pearl crescent (Phyciodes tharos) is a butterfly of North America. It is found in all parts of the United States except the west coast, and throughout Mexico and parts of southern Canada, in particular Ontario. Its habitat is open areas such as pastures, road edges, vacant lots, fields, open pine woods. Its pattern is quite variable. Males usually have black antenna knobs. Its upperside is orange with black borders; postmedian and submarginal areas are crossed by fine black marks. The underside of the hindwing has a dark marginal patch containing a light-colored crescent.

The wingspan is from 21 to 34 mm.[2] The species has several broods throughout the year, from April–November in the north, and throughout the year in the deep south and Mexico.

ventral view
Caterpillar
Composite showing the variation in this species

Adults find nectar from a great variety of flowers including dogbane, swamp milkweed, shepherd's needle, asters, and winter cress. Males patrol open areas for females. The eggs are laid in small batches on the underside of host plant leaves of aster species (family Asteraceae). Caterpillars eat the leaves and are gregarious when young. Hibernation is by third-stage caterpillars.

Similar species

References

  1. ^ "NatureServe Explorer 2.0 Phyciodes tharos Pearl Crescent". explorer.natureserve.org. Retrieved 3 October 2020.
  2. ^ "Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos) (Drury, 1773)". Butterflies of Canada. Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility (CBIF).
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Pearl crescent: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The pearl crescent (Phyciodes tharos) is a butterfly of North America. It is found in all parts of the United States except the west coast, and throughout Mexico and parts of southern Canada, in particular Ontario. Its habitat is open areas such as pastures, road edges, vacant lots, fields, open pine woods. Its pattern is quite variable. Males usually have black antenna knobs. Its upperside is orange with black borders; postmedian and submarginal areas are crossed by fine black marks. The underside of the hindwing has a dark marginal patch containing a light-colored crescent.

The wingspan is from 21 to 34 mm. The species has several broods throughout the year, from April–November in the north, and throughout the year in the deep south and Mexico.

ventral view Caterpillar Composite showing the variation in this species

Adults find nectar from a great variety of flowers including dogbane, swamp milkweed, shepherd's needle, asters, and winter cress. Males patrol open areas for females. The eggs are laid in small batches on the underside of host plant leaves of aster species (family Asteraceae). Caterpillars eat the leaves and are gregarious when young. Hibernation is by third-stage caterpillars.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Croissant perlé ( French )

provided by wikipedia FR

Phyciodes tharos

Le Croissant perlé (Phyciodes tharos) est une espèce d'insectes lépidoptères (papillons) de la famille des Nymphalidae, de la sous-famille des Nymphalinae et du genre Phyciodes.

Systématique

L'espèce Phyciodes tharos a été décrite par Dru Drury en 1773.

Noms vernaculaires

Le Croissant perlé se nomme Pearl Crescent en anglais.

Liste des sous-espèces

  • Phyciodes tharos tharos
  • Phyciodes tharos arcticus dos Passos, 1935 ;
  • Phyciodes tharos pascoensis Wright, 1905[1].

Description

Le Croissant perlé est un petit papillon (son envergure est comprise entre 21 et 45 mm) au dessus orange à bordure marron. Les ailes antérieures sont ornementées de taches et de lignes marron. Les ailes postérieures présentent une ligne submarginale de fins chevrons orange dans la bordure marron et une ligne submarginale de petits points marron. Les femelles, généralement, sont d'une couleur plus foncée que les mâles.

Le revers est plus clair, d'une couleur orange clair orné de quelques taches marron pour les antérieures, jaune clair pour les postérieures avec une bordure foncée contenant une marque argentée en forme de croissant[2],[3].

 src=
Revers du Croissant perlé.

Chenille

La chenille, épineuse, est marron foncée ornée d'une bande jaune sur chaque flanc[2].

 src=
Chenille du Croissant perlé.

Biologie

Période de vol et hivernation

Le croissant perlé vole de mai à septembre en deux générations au Canada mais en plusieurs plus au sud et même toute l'année dans le sud de la Californie et au Mexique [2],[3].

Il hiberne au troisième stade de la chenille[4]

Plantes hôtes

Les plantes hôtes des chenilles sont des asters, dont Aster laevis, Aster pilosus et Aster texanus[4].

Écologie et distribution

Il est présent en Amérique du Nord au Canada en Ontario, sur tout le territoire des États-Unis, sauf la côte ouest, et au Mexique. Aux États-Unis la limite ouest de sa présence passe par le Montana, le Wyoming, l'Utah et l'Arizona[4].

Biotope

Le Croissant perlé réside dans les espaces ouverts comme les pâturages, les bords de route, les terrains vagues, les champs, les bois de pins clairsemés, les prés secs[2].

Protection

Pas de statut de protection particulier [4].

 src=
Croissant perlé.

Notes et références

Annexes

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Auteurs et éditeurs de Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Croissant perlé: Brief Summary ( French )

provided by wikipedia FR

Phyciodes tharos

Le Croissant perlé (Phyciodes tharos) est une espèce d'insectes lépidoptères (papillons) de la famille des Nymphalidae, de la sous-famille des Nymphalinae et du genre Phyciodes.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Auteurs et éditeurs de Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Phyciodes cocyta ( Latin )

provided by wikipedia LA

Phyciodes cocyta est papilio familiae Nymphalidarum, qui in Oecozona Nearctica endemicus est.

Latitudo alarum est a 32 ad 38 mm. Adulti ab Iunio ad Iulium volare solent, secundum locum.

Larvae speciebus Asteracearum vescuntur.

Species simillimae

Nexus externi

  • De specie apud situm butterfliesandmoths.org (Butterflies and Moths of North America)
  • De specie apud situm cbif.gc.ca (Butterflies of Canada)
Commons-logo.svg Vicimedia Communia plura habent quae ad Phyciodem cocytam spectant.
Insecta Haec stipula ad insectum spectat. Amplifica, si potes!
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Et auctores varius id editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia LA

Phyciodes cocyta: Brief Summary ( Latin )

provided by wikipedia LA

Phyciodes cocyta est papilio familiae Nymphalidarum, qui in Oecozona Nearctica endemicus est.

Latitudo alarum est a 32 ad 38 mm. Adulti ab Iunio ad Iulium volare solent, secundum locum.

Larvae speciebus Asteracearum vescuntur.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Et auctores varius id editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia LA

Phyciodes tharos ( Dutch; Flemish )

provided by wikipedia NL

Insecten

Phyciodes tharos is een vlinder uit de familie Nymphalidae.[1] De wetenschappelijke naam van de soort is voor het eerst geldig gepubliceerd in 1773 door Dru Drury.

Bronnen, noten en/of referenties
Geplaatst op:
01-04-2013
Dit artikel is een beginnetje over biologie. U wordt uitgenodigd om op bewerken te klikken om uw kennis aan dit artikel toe te voegen. Beginnetje
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia-auteurs en -editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia NL