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Comments

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Yucca pallida is endemic to the blackland prairies of Texas and was originally included in Y. rupicola. J. M. Webber (1953) indicated that he found plants of Y. rupicola with key features similar to those of Y. pallida. Occasionally, plants with entire margins are found; these have been called Y. pallida var. edentata, which S. D. McKelvey (1938–1947) suggested might be a hybrid between Y. pallida and Y. arkansana. K. H. Clary (1997) indicated that DNA evidence confirms the close relationship of Y. pallida and Y. rupicola.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of North America Vol. 26: 425, 431, 438 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Description

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Plants forming loose colonies of rosettes, acaulescent, with branching subterranean caudices; rosettes 10–30 per colony, each rosette with fewer than 100 leaves. Leaf blade lanceolate, straight, flat except becoming concave near apex, widest above middle, 20–50 × 1–4.5 cm, flexible, glaucous, margins denticulate or sometimes wavy, yellow. Inflorescences paniculate, often distally racemose, arising beyond rosettes, 7–12 dm, with wide-spreading branchlets 1.5–2.3 dm; bracts erect; peduncle scapelike, 0.6–1.3 m, less than 2.5 cm diam., glaucous. Flowers pendent; perianth campanulate; tepals distinct, greenish white, elliptic to ovate, 5–6.5 × 2–3.2 cm; filaments 1.8–3.2 cm; pistil 3.2–4 cm; style white, 13–20 mm; stigmas lobed. Fruits erect, capsular, dehiscent, oblong-cylindric, 4.5–5.5 × 1.3–2 cm, dehiscence septicidal. Seeds dull black, thin, 5–7 mm diam.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 425, 431, 438 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Tex.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 425, 431, 438 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering spring.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 425, 431, 438 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Habitat

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Rocky prairies and uplands, rarely limestone hills; 100--400m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 425, 431, 438 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Yucca pallida var. edentata (Trelease) Cory; Y. rupicola Scheele var. edentata Trelease
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 425, 431, 438 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Yucca pallida

provided by wikipedia EN

Yucca pallida, sometimes called pale yucca, is a species of yucca native to Northern Mexico and parts of the blackland prairies of northern and central Texas, and notable for its light-colored leaves that range from a pale blue-gray to sage-green in color.[3]

The rosettes average 20–50 cm tall and 30–80 cm in diameter, with leaves 15–40 cm long and 2–3 cm wide, being widest around the midpoint. The rosettes sit directly on the ground, with little or no trunk. The leaves have a yellow to brown terminal spine, and are generally flat, possibly with some waviness or rolling along the edges. The inflorescence is a panicle, 1–2.5 m tall, with up to 100 bell-shaped flowers, each 5–7 cm long, with color ranging from light green to cream.[3]

Yucca pallida is known to hybridize with Yucca rupicola Scheele, which has a similar appearance, but whose leaves are more twisted and curved.

Although not common in horticulture, its color, size, and moderate hardiness (down to −18 °C or 0 °F) make it a good gardening alternative to other species of yuccas.

References

  1. ^ Clary, K.; Hodgson, W.; Salywon, A.; Puente, R. (2020). "Yucca pallida". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T117428365A117470142. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-1.RLTS.T117428365A117470142.en. Retrieved 20 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Yucca pallida". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 2014-01-19.
  3. ^ a b McKelvey, Susan Delano. 1947. Yuccas of the Southwestern United States 2: 57–63, map 2, pl. 13–14.
  • Fritz Hochstätter (Hrsg.): Yucca (Agavaceae). Band 1 Dehiscent-fruited species in the Southwest and Midwest of the USA, Canada and Baja California , Selbst Verlag, 2000. ISBN 3-00-005946-6
  • Fritz Hochstätter (Hrsg.): Yucca (Agavaceae). Band 2 Indehiscent-fruited species in the Southwest, Midwest and East of the USA, Selbst Verlag. 2002. ISBN 3-00-009008-8
  • Fritz Hochstätter (Hrsg.): Yucca (Agavaceae). Band 3 Mexico , Selbst Verlag, 2004. ISBN 3-00-013124-8
  • Mary & Gary Irish, Agaves, Yuccas, and Related Plants: a Gardener's Guide (Timber Press, 2000, ISBN 0-88192-442-3) pp. 260–261

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Yucca pallida: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Yucca pallida, sometimes called pale yucca, is a species of yucca native to Northern Mexico and parts of the blackland prairies of northern and central Texas, and notable for its light-colored leaves that range from a pale blue-gray to sage-green in color.

The rosettes average 20–50 cm tall and 30–80 cm in diameter, with leaves 15–40 cm long and 2–3 cm wide, being widest around the midpoint. The rosettes sit directly on the ground, with little or no trunk. The leaves have a yellow to brown terminal spine, and are generally flat, possibly with some waviness or rolling along the edges. The inflorescence is a panicle, 1–2.5 m tall, with up to 100 bell-shaped flowers, each 5–7 cm long, with color ranging from light green to cream.

Yucca pallida is known to hybridize with Yucca rupicola Scheele, which has a similar appearance, but whose leaves are more twisted and curved.

Although not common in horticulture, its color, size, and moderate hardiness (down to −18 °C or 0 °F) make it a good gardening alternative to other species of yuccas.

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