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Brief Summary

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The primate infraorder Lorisiformes is composed of two families: Lorisidae (lorises, pottos, and angwantibos) and Galagidae (galagos i.e. bushbabies). The taxonomic division between the Lorisiformes and Lemuriformes (lemurs) has been questioned in the past, though more recent morphological and molecular studies uphold the separate monophyly of these two groups (Perelman et al., 2011; Roos et al., 2004; Stanger-Hall, 1997). Lorisids are nocturnal primates found throughout Africa and Asia. Lorisiformes are one infraorder contained within the suborder Strepsirrhini.

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Abigail Nishimura
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Perelman, Polina, Warren E. Johnson, Christian Roos, Hector N. Seuánez, Julie E. Horvath, Miguel A. M. Moreira, Bailey Kessing, et al. “A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates.” PLoS Genet 7, no. 3 (March 17, 2011): e1001342. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001342. Roos, Christian, Jürgen Schmitz, and Hans Zischler. “Primate Jumping Genes Elucidate Strepsirrhine Phylogeny.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 101, no. 29 (July 20, 2004): 10650–10654. doi:10.1073/pnas.0403852101. Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F. “Phylogenetic Affinities Among the Extant Malagasy Lemurs (Lemuriformes) Based on Morphology and Behavior.” Journal of Mammalian Evolution 4, no. 3 (September 1, 1997): 163–194. doi:10.1023/A:1027345624734.
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Lorisoidea

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Lorisoidea is a superfamily of nocturnal primates found throughout Africa and Asia. Members include the galagos and the lorisids.[2]: 34–35  As strepsirrhines, lorisoids are related to the lemurs of Madagascar and are sometimes included in the infraorder Lemuriformes,[3][a] although they are also sometimes placed in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes Gregory, 1915.[2]: 38 

Classification

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Red slender loris, Loris tardigradus

Notes

  1. ^ a b c The monophyletic clade containing the lemurs and lorisoids is widely accepted, but the name to be used for the clade is not yet agreed upon. The term lemuriform is used here since it derives from one popular taxonomy that clumps the clade of toothcombed primates into one infraorder and the extinct, non-toothcombed adapiforms into another, both within the suborder Strepsirrhini.[4][5] However, a popular alternative taxonomy places the lorisoids in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes.[6]: 20–21 

References

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). "Order Primates". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 121–127. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  2. ^ a b Nekaris, N.A.I.; Bearder, S.K. (2011). "Chapter 4: The lorisiform primates of Asia and mainland Africa: Diversity shrouded in darkness". In Campbell, C.J.; Fuentes, A.; MacKinnon, K.C.; Bearder, S. K.; Stumpf, R.M. (eds.). Primates in Perspective (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-539043-8.
  3. ^ Cartmill, M.; Smith, F.H. (2011). The Human Lineage. John Wiley & Sons. p. 90. ISBN 978-1-118-21145-8.
  4. ^ Szalay, F.S.; Delson, E. (1980). Evolutionary History of the Primates. Academic Press. p. 149. ISBN 978-0126801507. OCLC 893740473.
  5. ^ Cartmill, M. (2010). "Primate Classification and Diversity". In Platt, M.; Ghazanfar, A. (eds.). Primate Neuroethology. Oxford University Press. pp. 10–30, esp. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-19-532659-8.
  6. ^ Hartwig, W. (2011). "Chapter 3: Primate evolution". In Campbell, C. J.; Fuentes, A.; MacKinnon, K. C.; Bearder, S. K.; Stumpf, R. M (eds.). Primates in Perspective (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. pp. 19–31. ISBN 978-0-19-539043-8.
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Lorisoidea: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Lorisoidea is a superfamily of nocturnal primates found throughout Africa and Asia. Members include the galagos and the lorisids.: 34–35  As strepsirrhines, lorisoids are related to the lemurs of Madagascar and are sometimes included in the infraorder Lemuriformes, although they are also sometimes placed in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes Gregory, 1915.: 38 

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